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Durbanite

France And Costs

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" I can tell when a restaurant uses fresh ingredients as I'm sure most people can."


Not judging by the glowing writeups on Tripadvisor for the restaurants where I see the deliveries of prepared food,not only in the UK but in France as well!

I don't hang about to see deliveries they are so commonplace you would need to be blind to miss them.

I walked up to the village in France to get bread most days and a van was there delivering food to the restaurant every day except sunday!

Some of the disgusting food I tasted was highly recommended by a top French Chef,cows udders,veals brains sea urchins and calves pancreas to name but a few!

knarf

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svimes made some good points, but one in particular was the issue of paying for parking, which is a pet hate of mine when we return to the UK on holiday. Go to the seaside in France - especially out of season - and unless you're in the middle of a major town the chances are you can park all day for free. In the UK it can cost you an arm and a leg just so you can walk the dog for a few minutes. Same for many tourist attractions (and don't get me started on hospital parking!! :angry:).

 

 

Some of the disgusting food I tasted was highly recommended by a top French Chef,cows udders,veals brains sea urchins and calves pancreas to name but a few!
knarf

 

 

Because it is not to your taste doesn't make it disgusting!

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svimes made some good points, but one in particular was the issue of paying for parking, which is a pet hate of mine when we return to the UK on holiday. Go to the seaside in France - especially out of season - and unless you're in the middle of a major town the chances are you can park all day for free. In the UK it can cost you an arm and a leg just so you can walk the dog for a few minutes. Same for many tourist attractions (and don't get me started on hospital parking!! :angry:).

 

The free and plentiful parking and low cost of attractions makes it worthwhile visiting France. We like to park near a beach when out and about and in the UK they charge you an arm and a leg. In France no issue with parking right next to the beach on a clean and nice looking parking lot.

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A man of the world then.

I delight in eating unusual food and would have no problem trying anything that you mention. All countries have their peasant food. East London has oysters, mussels, eels, winkles and whelks. It's what people who had no money ate back in the day, some of which have now become expensive, like oysters. Just because they are not to your taste doesn't make them disgusting.

The deliveries you speak of are not something I've ever noticed going into restaurants every day. My local restaurants tend to shop for their food at local suppliers like farms so get deliveries from them direct rather than the pre prepared fare of which you speak. I can't say as I've ever seen these deliveries even to the so called bistro pub type places where the chips come in 1 CWT bags.

Each to his own though. Enjoy.

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I am gobsmacked at the amounts spent on food and also eating out. For the two of us for 4 weeks, the food and drinks (Shopping) worked out at under £200. Eating out probably well under £100. We do not eat out more when away and stick to our normal spending habits. Never buy newspapers, magazines etc. We use a PAYG phone and Mifi on Three so no real cost as use text or email.

 

Obviously we spend more than you do. Our usual weekly grocery bill in the UK is knocking on £100 so actually we spent maybe £80 more in France over the 3 weeks and that would include things we probably wouldn't buy at home eg air dried ham, Camembert etc as well as trying out new things.

 

Food and drink are things we both enjoy and fortunately are in a position to indulge to a reasonable extent.

By the way, at least "home made" in France means something:

 

https://www. economie. gouv. fr/fait-maison

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The deliveries you speak of are not something I've ever noticed going into restaurants every day. My local restaurants tend to shop for their food at local suppliers like farms so get deliveries from them direct rather than the pre prepared fare of which you speak. I can't say as I've ever seen these deliveries even to the so called bistro pub type places where the chips come in 1 CWT bags.

 

 

Perhaps you need to get out earlier as deliveries are made early in the morning? How do you think the chips arrive?

 

My son was a chef and worked in the kitchens of some of the top London restaurants, hotels and executive dining room of very large companies. Do you really believe that top class restaurants do not buy from catering supply chains? Smaller "chef run owned" restaurants are no different.

 

And France is no different. .....................

 

https://www. brake. fr/

 

https://www. metro. fr/

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Obviously we spend more than you do. Our usual weekly grocery bill in the UK is knocking on £100 so actually we spent maybe £80 more in France over the 3 weeks and that would include things we probably wouldn't buy at home eg air dried ham, Camembert etc as well as trying out new things.

 

Food and drink are things we both enjoy and fortunately are in a position to indulge to a reasonable extent.

By the way, at least "home made" in France means something:

 

https://www. economie. gouv. fr/fait-maison

 

 

The UK has guidance - see item 81 - to provide "non-binding advice"............ :rolleyes:

 

https://www. food. gov. uk/sites/default/files/multimedia/pdfs/markcritguidance. pdf

 

Legislation should be in force not guidance.

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Because it is not to your taste doesn't make it disgusting!

What defines disgusting?

knarf

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Many years ago we went with friends to Les Andelys. I investigated eating places beforehand and booked a restaurant. The blurb made it clear that the chef/owner did everything with fresh, mainly local produce and specialised in edible flowers which were picked at 5am each morning.

 

We arrived at the place which looked like the house in psycho complete with Morticia as the owners wife.

 

I loved it, particularly the flowers. My wife and friends couldn't as they were too scared to try new stuff.

 

Same in another fish restaraunt. They all looked on in disgust as I enjoyed the fish soup.

 

John

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What defines disgusting?

knarf

 

arousing revulsion or strong indignation.
"he had the most disgusting rotten teeth"
synonyms: revolting, repellent, repulsive, sickening, nauseating, nauseous, stomach-churning, stomach-turning, off-putting, unpalatable, unappetizing, uninviting, unsavoury, distasteful, foul, nasty, obnoxious, odious;

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arousing revulsion or strong indignation.
"he had the most disgusting rotten teeth"
synonyms: revolting, repellent, repulsive, sickening, nauseating, nauseous, stomach-churning, stomach-turning, off-putting, unpalatable, unappetizing, uninviting, unsavoury, distasteful, foul, nasty, obnoxious, odious;

 

Aptly describes the food items I referred to!

My use of the word disgusting to describe them was a subjective use and perfectly acceptable.

knarf

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Point is that you found them disgusting where others don't.

In your opinion the food described is disgusting and others would disagree which is why it remains food and not waste. They certainly wouldn't cook something that no one eats.

This is the same all over the world. In Thailand and other middle eastern countries they also eat food that you would regard as disgusting. Dog for instance. Some rodents. Yet here we eat squirrel and the like in some regions. What's different?

If you were starving and needed to eat you would happily eat whatever was at hand. You'd be likely to make a sauce to disguise what it was, like tripe for instance.

It's all over the place and not everyone is poor nowadays so wouldn't have the experience of poverty food. You should try it, you may like it. Maybe a blindfold would help and being told it was chicken first.

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So now it appears that I cannot use the word disgusting because it may not be so to others?

I think paedophiles are disgusting but other paedophiles may not think so.

As I pointed out I used the word subjectively not objectively.

knarf

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That's disgusting!

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"It's all over the place and not everyone is poor nowadays so wouldn't have the experience of poverty food. You should try it, you may like it. Maybe a blindfold would help and being told it was chicken first.

 

How do you know I haven't?

I have tried all of the foods I mentioned and many more without the aid of a blindfold and found most disgusting!

knarf

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Good for you then, not just saying it as assumed. Well done you.

Still your opinion though, if they sell it, someone eats it.

Market forces work everywhere it seems.

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I think any offal, liver kidneys or brains type of food is disgusting especially tripe. None of it even tastes pleasant. However if you enjoy that sort of food good luck to you. Snails, snake, frog legs, crocodile tail, ostrich meat, mopani worm, flying ants etc are great tasting foods.

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I started to read this thread in France and have enjoyed the posts and opinions on foods, restaurants and general expenses in France.

 

When we go we generally know what costs more and what costs less, but the true test is comparing like for like. French meat and fish counters are not the same as ours - different cuts and species of fish - but you can spot good value and poor value as you can in the UK. We generally feel French food is more expensive for our basic foods but fantastic for our treats: oysters (by the kilo not the unit), prawns by the kilo, mussels and mackerel for the barbecue. Wine is cheaper, of course, but our preferred cider in Normandy and Brittany can be as expensive as the wine we buy at around €3 a bottle.

 

I've just done half a dozen comparisons on basic foods we like and use, and the comparisons between online Tesco and online Carrefour back up my thoughts on basic prices. I've tried to compare like for like but this is not scientific and if you want to pull it to pieces, please do. All prices per Kilogram.

 

Bananas €3. 25 (FR) £0. 72 (UK)

Pork Chops €19. 62(FR) £4. 86 (UK)

Beef Mince 5% fat €13. 86 (FR) £8. 00 (UK)

Rocqufort €19. 13 (FR) £18. 00 (UK)

Cod €29. 95 (FR) £13. 50 (UK)

Salmon €46. 39 (FR) £14. 00 (UK)

 

Other than these we get good value bread, local cheeses, great seafood, interesting and varied sausages (but not Andouilettes :o ), really expensive tarts and cakes from the patisseries, good fresh fruit in season, and of course wine, beer and cider.

 

We don't drink in the site bars. At around €3. 50 for a 33cl glass of beer that's about £5. 40 a pint. They must think we all live in London :D . (or am I just a cheapskate Northerner). We socialise on site with supermarket drinks. (the Brits talk caravans and sites, the Dutch talk Brexit, but at least they speak excellent English).

 

If you can find an Aldi or Lidl, as we did in Carnac, then your costs will tumble as they do in the UK. Crémant de Loire €4. 95 was popular with the French. I believe the various Crémants are becoming popular in the UK too, eating into the Prosecco market.

 

Websites if you want to browse: have fun.

 

http://www. ooshop. com/courses-en-ligne/ContentNavigation. aspx?TO_NOEUD_IDMO=N000000013056&TO_NOEUD_IDFO=80993&NOEUD_NIVEAU=1&UNIVERS_INDEX=2

 

https://www. tesco. com/groceries/department/default. aspx?N=4294793659&Ne=4294793660

 

Gordon

 

 

 

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No wonder no-one uses interweb shopping here,

 

These are from the 'pub' received last week

 

post-62174-0-84379100-1499788618_thumb.jpg

 

post-62174-0-81076700-1499788633_thumb.jpg

 

post-62174-0-12135400-1499788641_thumb.jpg

 

Edited to add;

 

Bananas 89c/Kg

Edited by Lost in France

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Post deleted

Edited by Chalky9

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Excellent post Chalky9, that'll shut em all up. Lol!

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Do you really believe that top class restaurants do not buy from catering supply chains? Smaller "chef run owned" restaurants are no different.

 

And France is no different

 

I do believe that the Chef owned establishments are different and prepare their own food.

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I started to read this thread in France and have enjoyed the posts and opinions on foods, restaurants and general expenses in France.

 

When we go we generally know what costs more and what costs less, but the true test is comparing like for like. French meat and fish counters are not the same as ours - different cuts and species of fish - but you can spot good value and poor value as you can in the UK. We generally feel French food is more expensive for our basic foods but fantastic for our treats: oysters (by the kilo not the unit), prawns by the kilo, mussels and mackerel for the barbecue. Wine is cheaper, of course, but our preferred cider in Normandy and Brittany can be as expensive as the wine we buy at around €3 a bottle.

 

I've just done half a dozen comparisons on basic foods we like and use, and the comparisons between online Tesco and online Carrefour back up my thoughts on basic prices. I've tried to compare like for like but this is not scientific and if you want to pull it to pieces, please do. All prices per Kilogram.

 

Bananas €3. 25 (FR) £0. 72 (UK)

Pork Chops €19. 62(FR) £4. 86 (UK)

Beef Mince 5% fat €13. 86 (FR) £8. 00 (UK)

Rocqufort €19. 13 (FR) £18. 00 (UK)

Cod €29. 95 (FR) £13. 50 (UK)

Salmon €46. 39 (FR) £14. 00 (UK)

 

Other than these we get good value bread, local cheeses, great seafood, interesting and varied sausages (but not Andouilettes :o ), really expensive tarts and cakes from the patisseries, good fresh fruit in season, and of course wine, beer and cider.

 

We don't drink in the site bars. At around €3. 50 for a 33cl glass of beer that's about £5. 40 a pint. They must think we all live in London :D . (or am I just a cheapskate Northerner). We socialise on site with supermarket drinks. (the Brits talk caravans and sites, the Dutch talk Brexit, but at least they speak excellent English).

 

If you can find an Aldi or Lidl, as we did in Carnac, then your costs will tumble as they do in the UK. Crémant de Loire €4. 95 was popular with the French. I believe the various Crémants are becoming popular in the UK too, eating into the Prosecco market.

 

Websites if you want to browse: have fun.

 

http://www. ooshop. com/courses-en-ligne/ContentNavigation. aspx?TO_NOEUD_IDMO=N000000013056&TO_NOEUD_IDFO=80993&NOEUD_NIVEAU=1&UNIVERS_INDEX=2

 

https://www. tesco. com/groceries/department/default. aspx?N=4294793659&Ne=4294793660

 

Gordon

 

 

 

I would agree with everything you've quoted - we must have been in the same areas! We too found most things we wanted were more expensive in France, particularly the meat, but the cheese, bread and wine were good value (not taking the exchange rate into account, just the "raw" price).

 

Most of the time we cooked our own meals, but went to get a takeaway from one camp restaurant & found a burger cost €9. 50 - and that was without chips. Yes it was a nice looking burger, but €9. 50?? On the other hand, one site did a 2 course meal for €12. 00, different every day and delicious too, and we had a great menu du jour in Provence for €18 at lunch time.

 

Diesel was cheaper than at home, but we made up for that with tolls as we chose to use the autoroutes sometimes. Sites were cheaper (using ACSI or several times not) and we used a range of sites from large with pools & restaurant to municipals. The most we paid was €19. 50 per night including tax and all bar one site had free wifi. The total bill for ferries, food & drink, diesel, entrance fees, sites & tolls was just over £2500 for a month.

 

Although we did complain to ourselves sometimes about the cost of food, we ate well, drank very well, and had a great holiday; we will return.

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As per my OP, it seems that most agree that costs have risen in France over the past year however it will not stop us going again. :D

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