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Fuel To Change Price Up To Ten Times A Day?


Llew
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As the title say's, read this.

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Also referred to here - https://www. petrolprices. com/fuel-to-cost-more-at-peak-times/

 

It pays to be vigilant on fuel prices - the more people avoid higher-priced outlets the lower the average price.

2015 VW Touareg 3. 0 V6 TDI + 2013 Lunar Clubman ES

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Also referred to here - https://www. petrolprices. com/fuel-to-cost-more-at-peak-times/

 

It pays to be vigilant on fuel prices - the more people avoid higher-priced outlets the lower the average price.

Thanks BG, I can never get links to work correctly off my tablet.

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We noticed how high the motorway prices were on Friday. ..£1. 35 a litre! We paid £1. 16 when we filled up before we left for Somerset.

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We noticed how high the motorway prices were on Friday. . .£1. 35 a litre! We paid £1. 16 when we filled up before we left for Somerset.

I paid 109. 7 (£1. 10) for diesel on my return yesterday to the Midlands from the North-East.

2015 VW Touareg 3. 0 V6 TDI + 2013 Lunar Clubman ES

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I paid 109. 7 (£1. 10) for diesel on my return yesterday to the Midlands from the North-East.

That's a good price! Nothing like that down here :(

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I think there could be a lot of problems with that system. I would question whether Trading Standards wouldn't get involved. We have a very competitive supermarket fuel sector here in the UK so who would blink first? If they acted in unison there would be claims of price fixing. The changing of prices several times a day or approaching weekends is quite common in Germany. How they put up with it I don't know.

 

David

David - Milton Keynes

Bailey Alliance 66-2 Motorhome for holidays and a Kia Venga for home.

 

Caravan Travels

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Like David says, fuel prices are extremely volatile in Germany and can go up and down by up to 10 Eurocents a litre within 24 hours. Usually mid week late afternoon is cheapest and weekends after 10pm most expensive.

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Morrison's up here tonight---£107 for 100litres. is what I paid.

Edited by blondchaser
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The OP's link is to a Notepad text file containing the address of a web page. Why not a direct link? I am suspicious of a link like this.

Graham

Unless otherwise stated all posts are my personal opinion 

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The OP's link is to a Notepad text file containing the address of a web page. Why not a direct link? I am suspicious of a link like this.

I did try getting the link to work, but my tablet had other ideas. Black Grouse has posted the correct link.

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Well if my local supermarket starts this sort of game, I will definitely go elsewhere. Completely ridiculous and for no good reason. Why is it an issue if a retailer has a busy time? A solution looking for a problem that really doesn't exist.

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Well if my local supermarket starts this sort of game, I will definitely go elsewhere. Completely ridiculous and for no good reason. Why is it an issue if a retailer has a busy time? A solution looking for a problem that really doesn't exist.

 

Each to his own, my take is different. It is a sad fact of life that the number of petrol stations has reduced significantly to the point where the supermarkets are now significant providers of fuel and the number of (typically smaller) independent stations is in serious decline. The fact that petrol station numbers have reduced means that queuing for fuel is now far more common than it used to be.

 

There is a chance that dynamic pricing might cause some people to think more about the time they fill up and that they would then choose to fill up when prices are lower; time wise this would spread the demand thereby reducing queues at the busiest times.

 

Providing that the 'pole signs' (the main roadside advertising signs) accurately reflect the price being charged at any given time and that there is also a clear indication that 'dynamic pricing' is being applied then I don't have a problem with this idea. It is entirely in the gift of any customer to make their own informed choice as to whether they use a station which applies dynamic pricing and if they do at what time they decide to buy their fuel.

Edited by jetA1
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I think there could be a lot of problems with that system. I would question whether Trading Standards wouldn't get involved. We have a very competitive supermarket fuel sector here in the UK so who would blink first? If they acted in unison there would be claims of price fixing. The changing of prices several times a day or approaching weekends is quite common in Germany. How they put up with it I don't know.

 

David

 

You have to remember that in Germany (and a few other northern European countries) unlike France and the UK they don't have the huge supermarkets and hypermarkets competing against each other for fuel sales. Add that (in Germany at least) many fuel stations are owned by the fuel companies so the more they can make on the forecourt the more it affects their bottom line.

2018 Passat B8 Estate 150GT TDi150 towing a 2018 Bailey Unicorn S4 Seville

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I did try getting the link to work, but my tablet had other ideas. Black Grouse has posted the correct link.

I too thought the link suspicious but it wasn't from a new contributor so rather than complain I just Googled the headline, got the PetrolPrices website and linked it in my posting. I can't cope with modern technology if it doesn't do what I want when I want so I have sympathy for the OP.

2015 VW Touareg 3. 0 V6 TDI + 2013 Lunar Clubman ES

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. .... many fuel stations are owned by the fuel companies so the more they can make on the forecourt the more it affects their bottom line. ....

 

The so called 'coco' model ((fuel) company owned company operated) exists in the UK, I forget what the numbers are these days, but between coco and supermarkets that accounts for a fair proportion of all fuel retailing operations.

 

In truth the comment "the more they can make on their forecourt" applies to any model of ownership, they all want to make money but margins on fuel are only part of the storey. There is good income to be made from retailing just about any product other than fuel in the forecourt shop / convenience store, the price of fuel being adjusted (on a sometimes very local basis) in order to attract customers and generate footfall through the forecourt shop.

 

There is no doubt that some sites/operators can and do take advantage of aspects such as position, their site may be easier to access than another and sometimes the margin on fuel will be 'tweaked' to provide a little more income because of it. It's nothing new it's just the laws of supply and demand working as it does with pretty much everything else we purchase in our lives.

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Blondchaser, what size tank have you got !?? :o

2011 Land Rover Freelander 2, Lago grey 2013 Freelander Dynamic Black, followed by a 2013 Elddis 574 Magnum GT white

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My D4 has only got an eighty odd litre fuel tank.

 

Think that must have been two refills or he took two cars. ;)

 Living the dream, well more of a nightmare ~ Griff    :ph34r:

Wheels at the front ~ Discovery 4 Towing Machine

Wheels at the back ~ 4 of ‘em

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Don't t worry, that nice uncle Jeremy will be PM in a fortnight an the price of everything will be fixed. They'll be planting money trees everywhere to cover their manifesto commitments.

Nissan X-Trail Tekna + Coachman Festival 450

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If the fuel in a forecourt tank was all purchased at a single price, and a certain profit is acceptable at certain times, any increase in the forecourt price has to be a case of an unacceptable rip off by the fuel station owners.

 

I do not like the idea, do not support it in any way, and believe the markup should be legally limited to a maximum percentage figure above the purchase price. While protecting the customer this would still allow for outlets to take a lower profit per litre while still maintaining (or even increasing) overall profits by increased sales.

 

This is a total misuse of technology and ultimately will only favour the seller (not the customer) as we all know that in reality, unless there is legislation in place to prevent it, the choice will be between paying the standard price, or an artificially hiked price.

 

As an aside, I rarely purchase fuel at busy times as I refuse to queue unless there is insufficient fuel in the tank to safely drive further. If this is the way things are going, I can see more people will adopt the habit of carrying spare fuel again in a can, and that's not the safest option is it?

 

Finally if delivery drivers fill up at peak times with the higher prices, then ultimately we will all end up paying for it, whether we like it or not.

 

Gordon.

Fourwinds Hurricane 31D Motorhome. Also MGTF135 1. 8i Roadster (fun) & Volvo V70 3.2Ltr LPG (everyday car)
Unless otherwise stated, my posts will be my personal thoughts and have the same standing as any other member of Caravan and Motorhome Talk.

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Motorists ripped off for a change.

Fuelnprices in Australia seemed to change all the time whenbwe were there,locals confirmed it was the case!

Hyundai Santa Fe+Bailey Unicorn Cadiz

Mini Cooper convertible -fun Car!:)

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I usually fill up a 4. 30am going to work. I'm sure that will be off peak.

 

Lee

Yeti 2.0TDi EU6 150 DSG 4X4 L&K, Octavia TSi Manual, Fabia TSi DSG, Swift Challenger.

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I usually fill up a 4. 30am going to work. I'm sure that will be off peak.

 

Lee

Good value too - despite being underground, the tank will have cooled overnight so each litre gives marginally more energy - it will of course expand slightly in the car tank as the day warms up so important to leave the air-gap for safety and stop at the first automatic shut-off off the nozzle.

2015 VW Touareg 3. 0 V6 TDI + 2013 Lunar Clubman ES

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I'm in favour of it in theory as it may, hopefully, reduce the queues caused by such as the 'tank dribbler' motorist & their ilk, that thinks it's clever to put 5 or 10 L in at a fill & then return within a day or two for a repeat session LOL. I just can't see the point of not filling the tank at each visit.

 

I once witnessed a woman (yes I know it's not PC but deal with it) take 9 mins. to dribble 70p worth of petrol in the tank, which was already full. The queue was so bad the cashier came out to ask what the problem was. The price could well go up in that time!

 

It should also spread the demand over a greater period of time, yet again reducing potential queues. Having to block the pump until payment is made when the 'pay at the pump' facility is not available doesn’t help either. As, apparently, the majority seam unable to switch off their engines whilst they are waiting just think of the pollution & wasted fuel reduction in all those shorter queues!

 

One thing needs sorting though, the price must not be allowed to go up during the filling process. Can't happen? It once did, to me. As I put the filler in I saw the price change!!!

 

Help! I think I've just found a potential benefit in new technology. There's bound to be a catch. ....

3L auto Nissan Terrano, 2004 & Swift Elegance 530, 2018. As Leonardo da Vinci once said: 'If you find from your own experience that something is a fact & it contradicts what some authority has written down, then you must abandon the authority & base your reasoning on your own findings' ie: use your common sense!

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I'm in favour of it in theory as it may, hopefully, reduce the queues caused by such as the 'tank dribbler' motorist & their ilk, that thinks it's clever to put 5 or 10 L in at a fill & then return within a day or two for a repeat session LOL. I just can't see the point of not filling the tank at each visit.

 

I once witnessed a woman (yes I know it's not PC but deal with it) take 9 mins. to dribble 70p worth of petrol in the tank, which was already full. The queue was so bad the cashier came out to ask what the problem was. The price could well go up in that time!

 

It should also spread the demand over a greater period of time, yet again reducing potential queues. Having to block the pump until payment is made when the 'pay at the pump' facility is not available doesn’t help either. As, apparently, the majority seam unable to switch off their engines whilst they are waiting just think of the pollution & wasted fuel reduction in all those shorter queues!

 

One thing needs sorting though, the price must not be allowed to go up during the filling process. Can't happen? It once did, to me. As I put the filler in I saw the price change!!!

 

Help! I think I've just found a potential benefit in new technology. There's bound to be a catch. . . ..

 

Queues are much less at all-automatic card-operated pumps, especially if there's room to drive out between the two pump lanes, eg when the rear car finishes first.

 

I notice that at mixed facility stations that the pay at pump has no queues while the pay at kiosk pumps have long queues.

 

Fully card-operated stations are clearly cheaper to run but have no profitable shop making a contribution.

2015 VW Touareg 3. 0 V6 TDI + 2013 Lunar Clubman ES

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