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Stockcroft

Fridge, Ferry And Bulbs

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Off to France next week for inaugural European trip with van so preparations in hand. ....getting inundated with lists! Two very, very basic questions:

 

(i) we are travelling on the overnight Portsmouth/St Malo crossing. If we get the fridge down to operating temperature before we leave home and put some essentials in there will the car's battery continue to keep the fridge operating whilst hooked up overnight on the ship?

 

(ii) Spare bulbs. I have bought a basic Halfords kit of spare bulbs the majority of which, I am told, should fit my car as they are generic (ie indicator, brake lights etc). Will those same lights do for the caravan too? I can't find any specs for the types of bulbs required in the caravan handbook.

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regarding the fridge- i believe not. From what i remember, it was a rule that the fridge was to be turned off. in fact, i always took the electric hook up off the car just in case it did suckle from the car battery (you will see people suffering with flat batteries at the other side although this is sometimes done to them not turning off their alarms). I would recommend freezing stuff and putting it in there to keep it cold. You could always take a toolbox onto the ship. I did once and plugged it in to keep stuff cool. worked wonders.

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The battery won't keep the fridge cold your car battery should disconnect from the caravan when the ignition is turned off, freeze your milk or get those ice block things (you know the plastic things that freeze) that will keep your fringe cold.

Edited by Arnie

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As above, the fridge will not run off the car unless the engine is running so you need to get it as cold as possible before you get on the boat.

 

Make sure stuff is turned off in the van or do as suggested and disconnect the van from the car (don't forget to reconnecte it though before you move off - put a big notice on your drivers seat to remind you)

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The battery will not work the fridge! Only works when the car engine is running! Make sure it is cooled at home, and fill it with lots of cold stuff! It will be perfectly OK! Make sure you disconnect the vehicle to caravan electrics, otherwise you may suffer a flat battery!

Only one push on your key fob to lock your discovery. The alarm will then not be set!

Bon voyage!

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Hi

 

As the others have said the fridge will not work with the car engine off but we have found on the Portsmouth/St Malo ferry, and indeed the Portsmouth/ Bilbao ferry, if you get the fridge temperature down to the proper operating temperature after filling it and don't open the door again till you come off the ferry you should have no problems.

 

Have a great trip.

 

Steve

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(ii) Spare bulbs. I have bought a basic Halfords kit of spare bulbs the majority of which, I am told, should fit my car as they are generic (ie indicator, brake lights etc). Will those same lights do for the caravan too? I can't find any specs for the types of bulbs required in the caravan handbook.

 

 

To answer this part of your queries.

 

Filament bulbs in caravan road lights are similar to car bulbs of the same type. Don't worry about finding bulbs as they are as easily found in France as the UK including in supermarkets.

 

In the event of being stopped for a faulty light you will almost certainly be given the chance to change the bulb or advised to do so asap. Even police cars suffer bulb failures on the road.

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You have mentioned spare bulbs; don't forget that for France you will need a fluorescent vest for each person travelling and 2 warning triangles (1 for car and 1 for caravan). Also if the driver wears glasses, you must have a spare pair with you.

Provided your caravan has standard bulbs (not LED) then the kit should do both car and caravan.

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You have mentioned spare bulbs; don't forget that for France you will need a fluorescent vest for each person travelling and 2 warning triangles (1 for car and 1 for caravan). Also if the driver wears glasses, you must have a spare pair with you.

Provided your caravan has standard bulbs (not LED) then the kit should do both car and caravan.

By law you only need one vest and it isn't law that you must have spare glasses but it is obviously common sense to have them.

knarf

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You could freeze some milk, put this in the fridge and it will keep the fridge cool. Then when milk is melted you can use it.

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when milk is melted you can use it.

But use it quickly for it won't keep too long. I also take 1ltr cartons of orange juice and a couple pre frozen at home keeps the fridge cold even after 36 hours to Santander.

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Re the hi viz jacket, it must be accessible to the person using it without get out of the car.

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Another idea to help keep the fridge cold is a couple of pre cooked frozen meals in the fridge and saves worrying about what to have after a day's travelling. I have taken a round container of frozen soup and it has still been solid at the centre two days later with the fridge being opened several times during those days.

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By law you only need one vest and it isn't law that you must have spare glasses but it is obviously common sense to have them.

knarf

 

WRONG. You must have one vest for each (physical) occupant of the vehicle and they must be located such that they can be put on before exiting the vehicle. In practice this means only the driver's vest needs to be available as the driver can the retrieve the vests for the passengers - assuming of course (1) the vests are where they can be got at - no good if they are in the boot and the lid won't open after a rear end shunt, and (2) the vehicle is not on fire!

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We came over from Plymouth to Roscoff last night, with no frozen food at all.

 

Landed at 10 am this morning and went round to the little Casino supermarket (yes, open on Sunday mornings) for wine, beer, and essentials, then drove round to the Granit Rose coast and had Sunday lunch and a bottle of cider sitting in the sun on the terrace at the Bistrot du Port in Ploumanach with everyone else.

 

Is frozen English food essential to the survival of life as we know it? There are shops, there are restaurants. The food and drink over here is fine.

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WRONG. You must have one vest for each (physical) occupant of the vehicle and they must be located such that they can be put on before exiting the vehicle. In practice this means only the driver's vest needs to be available as the driver can the retrieve the vests for the passengers - assuming of course (1) the vests are where they can be got at - no good if they are in the boot and the lid won't open after a rear end shunt, and (2) the vehicle is not on fire!

I.'m sorry but you are wrong,The Code de la Route says:

En circulation, le conducteur doit disposer de son gilet jaune à portée de main. Lors de . .. Art R 416-19 du code de la route. Art R 416-19

It specifies the driver no reference to passengers.

knarf

Edited by KNARF

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I.'m sorry but you are wrong,

There's maybe some confusion here about Countries. I believe the law in Spain is that before each passenger leaves the car on a main road, they must be wearing a high-viz jacket. If they don't leave the car, they don't need a jacket. I understood that in France only the driver needs a jacket - although I don't mind being wrong. .. :o

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Many thanks for the very helpful guidance. Will certainly be disconnecting the power cable whilst on the ferry - a flat battery wouldn't be the ideal start to the holiday. We are driving down to the Ile de Re in one hit so probably won't get there until late afternoon so want to have some stuff for meal that evening and breakfast in the morning. After that it will be local produce all the way. Thanks for the ancillary suggestions on hi viz jackets - but have all that stuff squared away already. Separate threads on items to take when travelling abroad have been helpful in that context.

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The fridge works well as a cool box even when disconnected. You can freeze milk, water orange juice etc to help ours survived without problems, 36hrs to Spain. It is a little known fact, but I am told it is possible to buy food in France.

 

Hi viz vests no matter what the law says. Seems to me that it just makes sense to have one for every occupant of a vechicle. You can pick them up for next to nothing Aldi/ Lidl often sell them.

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I have found on the Portsmouth- Caen crossing, if you board with a full freezer compartment it is still solid after 6 hours on the boat

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