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Review: Outlander Phev

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Comfortable; tows well; brilliant mpg around town (effectively infinite!)

 

Click here to view the towcar review

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When I was camping in Spain I noticed that lots of Dutch families were running PHEV's and had them plugged into their campsite electric. I asked one Dutch guy why they were so popular in Holland and he said they were only taxed at 4% instead of 24%.

I was interested in getting one myself but unfortunately my caravan is too heavy (2000 Kg) so I went for Mitsubishi's larger offering.

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When I was camping in Spain I noticed that lots of Dutch families were running PHEV's and had them plugged into their campsite electric. I asked one Dutch guy why they were so popular in Holland and he said they were only taxed at 4% instead of 24%.

I was interested in getting one myself but unfortunately my caravan is too heavy (2000 Kg) so I went for Mitsubishi's larger offering.

 

With a kerb weight of 2000kg (as stated in the review) I would have been interested too but it unfortunately doesn't equate to an equivalently high towing limit so at 1850 kg MTPLM it's no good to us either which is a shame really, it's a nice car and an interesting concept.

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I've just spent 4and a half weeks in Spain and Portugal but never thought I had enough electric supply to recharge the car. I was under the impression I needed at least a 10 amp supply to recharge the car and, as I'm sure most know, sites in Spain and Portugal usually only supply 5 or 6 amps.

 

If I am wrong in any of my assumptions I would welcome enlightenment - over 4 weeks on only petrol was a bit steep (particularly in Portugal - £1. 40ish per litre for unleaded - ooh!)

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Our site owner has banned the recharging of electric vehicles and chatting to him he said that site owners overall are worried by their appearance.

 

As he put it, his pitch price is fixed on the basis of average electricity consumption over a year to provide a sensible profit margin. If the number of electric vehicles increases and start charging on the pitch, that margin is reduced or even eliminated. That means either a price increase for everybody, whether they use more power or not, or the installation of metering and management of individual charging for power which will increase costs and therefore pitch prices.

 

He's waiting to hear the Club's views on the issue as they should set the tone for best practice but, so far, they've been silent on the issue.

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Just following up on this, I recently stayed at one of our favourite CLs in Cambridgeshire and, simply, asked the owner how much extra I would need to pay to charge my PHEV. He asked how much a charge cost; I told him and he said "put a couple of quid in the wifi box"

I think if we are upfront and honest, there is no reason why we shouldn't be able to take advantage of the higher limits on UK campsite electricity supplies. I guess it will be the ones who simply plug in and don't ask that will give the rest of us a bad name - a bit like some dog owners :ph34r:

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Just returned home from the Lake District with our 15 plate PHEV Outlander and for the first time decided to check on the petrol side of our hybrid motor. We tow a Bailey Pageant Burgundy which tows well behind the PHEV. Just before pulling onto the M6 we filled up with petrol, I brimmed it which is not recommended but thought it would be easier to work out the mileage when filled on arrival at home, I reset the clock to zero and off we went. We did not make home and stopped off on the M1 Wakefield turn off and a couple of hundred yards after the slip road filled up at the first garage we came to. I made a note of the mileage, and the amount of fuel to brim it again. I had an idea it was a little thirsty, a 2 litre petrol pulling a heavy car and a reasonably heavy van will not return good figures. I was not prepared for the result, 17. 1 mpg. I was so surprised I re-calculated but got the same figure. 99. 9% of the mileage was motorway with the cruise control set at 60mph, verified by our sat nav.

 

We have had two 4. 2 Toyota diesel Landcruiser Amazons which blinded the PHEV on mpg. So it's a no brainer, our next towcar will not be another hybrid PHEV that's for sure.

 

The hybrid is ok round town if you do less than 25 miles and can get back home to charge it up again. For rural driving and towing I have to say it's use is very limited.

Edited by Angel1
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Angel1, I'm always very wary about basing mpg figures on just one tankful.

 

When I got my Volvo the first brim-to-brim measure gave a figure of 33. 8mpg, with no towing.

 

But now, after 37 tankfuls in nearly 3 years, it's settled to a regular figure of 44. 5mpg, and that includes towing.

 

So that one-off first measure was wildly incorrect, and always has been when I look back through the records for my previous cars.

 

John

 

PS, as discussed recently, cruise control is thought by some to be not as economical as you may expect.

Edited by Johnaldo

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Angel1, I'm always very wary about basing mpg figures on just one tankful.

 

When I got my Volvo the first brim-to-brim measure gave a figure of 33. 8mpg, with no towing.

 

But now, after 37 tankfuls in nearly 3 years, it's settled to a regular figure of 44. 5mpg, and that includes towing.

 

So that one-off first measure was wildly incorrect, and always has been when I look back through the records for my previous cars.

 

John

 

PS, as discussed recently, cruise control is thought by some to be not as economical as you may expect.

Ah but, it's relatively unusual to have a tank full to tank full measurement where the car has just been used for towing, usually there's a mix of solo and towing involved. So it's likely that the figure is right. After all the big loaded PHEV pulling a decent size van at 60mph purely on a petrol engine with no electrical assistance I'd expect a figure around what was achieved.

 

Looking back at my V70 fuel records it's been as low as 28mpg towing and up as high as 42mpg solo. In reality whilst towing it probably achieved 25mpg. That was a 2 litre diesel and with the petrol differential it isn't that hard to see 17mpg as probable.

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The only surprise about 17 mpg, is that you were surprised. A 2 litre petrol, lugging unused batteries and electric motors, plus a ton and a half of caravan. Sounds reasonable. I co drove one without a caravan to Switzerland and back last year, and my mate reckoned low to mid 20s on that trip. We certainly had to stop plenty often to fill up.

 

I don't really worry about fuel consumption, I just pour more in when it's needed. I'm in no way convinced that hybrid/electric vehicles are the way forward, but that's a whole different kettle of fish.

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Hybrid vehicles on anything other than local journeys are at a distinct disadvantage. Hybrids only gain in stop / start motoring, there's absolutely no advantage any other time. Plugin Hybrid Electric Vehicles have a limited advantage with the possibility of running as an electric only vehicle.

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Hybrid vehicles on anything other than local journeys are at a distinct disadvantage. Hybrids only gain in stop / start motoring, there's absolutely no advantage any other time. Plugin Hybrid Electric Vehicles have a limited advantage with the possibility of running as an electric only vehicle.

 

On the money with your post. Town/City driving is where the PHEV hybrid earns its corn, stop start not a problem to it on Electric. The car has NEVER attained 30 mpc (miles per charge), more like 25, so you are still very limited to be honest. Maybe in 10 years time the electric technology will be the way to go, but not now to be blunt.

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On the money with your post. Town/City driving is where the PHEV hybrid earns its corn, stop start not a problem to it on Electric. The car has NEVER attained 30 mpc (miles per charge), more like 25, so you are still very limited to be honest. Maybe in 10 years time the electric technology will be the way to go, but not now to be blunt.

It will be interesting in the cold weather, I assume then it burns fuel to provide heat? Aircon on the hot days must also kill the electric range.

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Our neighbour's son has a PHEV and every time he visits his parents the car is plugged into the socket in his Dad's garage. I bet if it was a normally fuelled car he wouldn't dream of pinching fuel from his parents.

 

The Town/City thing reminds me, how come every car advert on TV these days is about car's being great 'in the city'. For goodness sake the city is where you don't really need a car 'cos there's plenty of adequate public transport. Live in a village or small market town or out in the country and that's when you NEED a car.

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Our neighbour's son has a PHEV and every time he visits his parents the car is plugged into the socket in his Dad's garage. I bet if it was a normally fuelled car he wouldn't dream of pinching fuel from his parents.

 

The Town/City thing reminds me, how come every car advert on TV these days is about car's being great 'in the city'. For goodness sake the city is where you don't really need a car 'cos there's plenty of adequate public transport. Live in a village or small market town or out in the country and that's when you NEED a car.

Exactly - eliminating the need for cars, of any type, is the way forward for cities - rurally there's simply no issue with NOx as, unlike cities, it just degrades naturally into Nitrogen and Oxygen which we all need

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It will be interesting in the cold weather, I assume then it burns fuel to provide heat? Aircon on the hot days must also kill the electric range.

You are correct in your assumptions. When the heating is turned on, even on minimum blow, the electric range gauge drops by 5 miles immediately. So visiting one of my previous posts where I stated I only get 25 miles per charge, with the heater on in reality it is 20 mpc.

 

As an aside, the PHEV is sold on the premise of been able to achieve 156 to the gallon. How that is attained is beyond me. Maybe another PHEV owner can put me straight.

 

" The class-leading Outlander PHEV (PLUG IN HYBRID ELECTRIC VEHICLE) is unlike any other SUV 156 mpg, no road tax, low emissions. "

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As an aside, the PHEV is sold on the premise of been able to achieve 156 to the gallon. How that is attained is beyond me. Maybe another PHEV owner can put me straight.

 

" The class-leading Outlander PHEV (PLUG IN HYBRID ELECTRIC VEHICLE) is unlike any other SUV 156 mpg, no road tax, low emissions. "

 

It's the stupidity of the EU test - it starts with a fully charged battery and covers just 11 km (6. 8 miles) - a totally unsuitable test for a PHEV.

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Mitsubishi claim 160 mpg and a 500 mile range with full battery and full tank. Work it out. .......

500 miles - 33 of electric range = 467 miles

467 miles / 9. 9 gallons = 47. 17 mpg

 

Firstly the electric range wont happen, secondly theres no way on Gods earth a 2 litre petrol in this lump will manage 47. 17 mpg and absolutely nowhere can I see where Mitsubishi's claimed 160+ mpg comes from other than when it's on the back of a breakdown truck. Their figures quoted are irrelevant and completely misleading.

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But any figures quoted by a manufacturer in an ad. must be supported by relevant EU test data AND they are legally obliged not to quote anything but EU test data. By now, everybody must surely know the EU tests aren't fit for purpose but ads can't say anything else.

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But any figures quoted by a manufacturer in an ad. must be supported by relevant EU test data AND they are legally obliged not to quote anything but EU test data. By now, everybody must surely know the EU tests aren't fit for purpose but ads can't say anything else.

Sadly many people still treat them as advertising claims - can't understand why as the use of non-standard figures was banned in the UK 40 years ago in the '70s, specifically to eliminate car maker's exaggerated claims. Since then they MUST include official test figures in adverts and can't show any other figures.

 

The EU test is squarely to blame for all this - it'll change a little from September 2017 when the WLTP-RDE test replaces the EU-NEDC test but people should still beware of using the new figures.

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But any figures quoted by a manufacturer in an ad. must be supported by relevant EU test data AND they are legally obliged not to quote anything but EU test data. By now, everybody must surely know the EU tests aren't fit for purpose but ads can't say anything else.

I'm sure there wouldn't be any complaints if they gave the real figures, on what grounds could anyone complain?

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I'm sure there wouldn't be any complaints if they gave the real figures, on what grounds could anyone complain?

It's specifically illegal under Advertising regulations.

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I'm tempted to go for a test drive and ask them to show me how it achieves 166mpg and 55 mpg when running on petrol.

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Just returned home from the Lake District with our 15 plate PHEV Outlander and for the first time decided to check on the petrol side of our hybrid motor. We tow a Bailey Pageant Burgundy which tows well behind the PHEV. Just before pulling onto the M6 we filled up with petrol, I brimmed it which is not recommended but thought it would be easier to work out the mileage when filled on arrival at home, I reset the clock to zero and off we went. We did not make home and stopped off on the M1 Wakefield turn off and a couple of hundred yards after the slip road filled up at the first garage we came to. I made a note of the mileage, and the amount of fuel to brim it again. I had an idea it was a little thirsty, a 2 litre petrol pulling a heavy car and a reasonably heavy van will not return good figures. I was not prepared for the result, 17. 1 mpg. I was so surprised I re-calculated but got the same figure. 99. 9% of the mileage was motorway with the cruise control set at 60mph, verified by our sat nav.

 

We have had two 4. 2 Toyota diesel Landcruiser Amazons which blinded the PHEV on mpg. So it's a no brainer, our next towcar will not be another hybrid PHEV that's for sure.

 

The hybrid is ok round town if you do less than 25 miles and can get back home to charge it up again. For rural driving and towing I have to say it's use is very limited.

Was this running solely on petrol, or was the car also recharging the batteries?

 

Ideally such a test should be done with the batteries full and then run on petrol only.

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I'm sure there wouldn't be any complaints if they gave the real figures, on what grounds could anyone complain?

Ah! But there's the rub. What are the 'real figures'?

 

Are they the very best the manufacturer can finnese out of a controlled lab environment, are they what petrol head journalists get trying to wreck the thing on a test track, are they the results when driven by an eco-warrior using his best Mobil Economy Run techniques. Are they tootling round some urban suburb, are they blasting up the M6 at the dead of night, or roaring over an open moor at 5am Top Gear style, or stop/start on a commute to work where it would be quicker to walk.

 

Whatever anyone says is 'normal' won't be normal for lots of people.

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