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Leave Your Handbrake On Please.


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John,

 

If you have brakes not releasing again, connect your car and "Reverse" the unit. This should make the auto reverse operate and free things up. By just pulling forward with the car the seized brakes are less likely to free themselves.

 

Regards

 

Mark

 

Tried that, that's the logic I used. But does not do the trick. I don't think the problem has to do with the reversing mechanism. Don't know what it is.

 

John

Volvo V70 D3 SE (was Peugeot 4007, SsangYong Korando), Pulling a Lunar Clubman SI 2015. If you are depressed, you are living in the past. If you are anxious, you are living in the future. If you are at peace, you are living in the present.

 

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Leave the handbrake on and come back to find it seized on.   Ian

15 years? You should get out more often.

I'll be out of step then. I always apply the handbrake, when it's parked up, on site, or stored at home.   I've not had a handbrake seize on - ever. It has never occurred to me that it could, o

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Tried that, that's the logic I used. But does not do the trick. I don't think the problem has to do with the reversing mechanism. Don't know what it is.

 

John

 

John,

 

I should have mentioned that when reversing stuck brakes, sometimes you need to reverse the car attached to the caravan abruptly to get the shoes released. When were the brakes last adjusted, serviced or replaced? If you are technically minded you can check the system out yourself by reading here.

 

http://www. al-ko. co. uk/edit/files/handbooks/overrun-braking-system-handbook. pdf

 

The thing is if the brakes have been incorrectly set up, the symptoms you describe can happen. I was called to a caravan that had been towed from UK to its pitch in France for a week and brakes left on by owner. Campsite owner comes to put caravan back into storage could not release brakes. He called me, and the brakes had been over adjusted and virtually no slack in the system and would not release. Had to release tension in the system and percussion adjustment before drums would release. The owner had had it serviced before bringing it over to France to store it here.

 

Regards

 

Mark

Edited by MDM

Gite and 6 pitch CL type Campsite https://labucaille.com/ Normandie France

 

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John,

 

I should have mentioned that when reversing stuck brakes, sometimes you need to reverse the car attached to the caravan abruptly to get the shoes released. When were the brakes last adjusted, serviced or replaced? If you are technically minded you can check the system out yourself by reading here.

 

http://www. al-ko. co. uk/edit/files/handbooks/overrun-braking-system-handbook. pdf

 

The thing is if the brakes have been incorrectly set up, the symptoms you describe can happen. I was called to a caravan that had been towed from UK to its pitch in France for a week and brakes left on by owner. Campsite owner comes to put caravan back into storage could not release brakes. He called me, and the brakes had been over adjusted and virtually no slack in the system and would not release. Had to release tension in the system and percussion adjustment before drums would release. The owner had had it serviced before bringing it over to France to store it here.

 

Regards

 

Mark

 

Thanks for the info Mark.

 

Van is only tow years old, 2nd service next month. Problems only started after 1st service. So I agree, something happened at that service. They have had it back 2 or 3 times to correct and tell me each time that they have been checked and adjusted. However, as I said earlier, I am not sure they have believed me. But since I took a video they are more convinced.

 

Next month is the crunch point. I pick it up from storage (handbrake has deliberately been left on for 6 weeks). And take it for the 2nd service. Just have to see how we go from there.

 

I used to do all my own servicing but guarantee and age is now against me. Strangely I never had a problem when I did it all myself, Now I have new serviced vans I have this problem and a couple of years ago a wheel come of my Unicorn.

 

All good fun!

 

 

John

Volvo V70 D3 SE (was Peugeot 4007, SsangYong Korando), Pulling a Lunar Clubman SI 2015. If you are depressed, you are living in the past. If you are anxious, you are living in the future. If you are at peace, you are living in the present.

 

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Thanks for the info Mark.

 

Van is only tow years old, 2nd service next month. Problems only started after 1st service. So I agree, something happened at that service. They have had it back 2 or 3 times to correct and tell me each time that they have been checked and adjusted. However, as I said earlier, I am not sure they have believed me. But since I took a video they are more convinced.

 

Next month is the crunch point. I pick it up from storage (handbrake has deliberately been left on for 6 weeks). And take it for the 2nd service. Just have to see how we go from there.

 

I used to do all my own servicing but guarantee and age is now against me. Strangely I never had a problem when I did it all myself, Now I have new serviced vans I have this problem and a couple of years ago a wheel come of my Unicorn.

 

All good fun!

 

 

John

 

 

Hi John,

 

I do know what you mean! Always did my own work on all my vehicles, but I suppose being in engineering myself it was easier for me than to pay others to do it. I used to be in the RAF maintaining Hercules C130 aircraft. I am now living in France and servicing caravans as part of my living. I understand that some of the larger companies may take shortcuts/not do the work correctly (I have unfortunately had this experienced myself on one of my vehicles) so doing it yourself (if done correctly) if warranty issues is not a problem. Gas safety checks etc unless qualified do not attempt yourself.

 

I hope you get a satisfactory result when you next visit your dealer.

 

Regards

 

Mark

Gite and 6 pitch CL type Campsite https://labucaille.com/ Normandie France

 

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I've noticed that some people leave their movers engaged. I've only done it accidentally. With a wheel lock and the mover on, the van isn't going to roll much! Just wonder if there's a downside for tyres and movers.

 

Regarding using the legs to stop the van moving I've had mine move in a gale enough to break a couple of the steady pads I had fitted. I can't remember if the handbrake was on but there was a wheel lock on one side.

 

At home I usually have the handbrake off. But all the vans at sales outlets have them on and often the steadies are up.

 

I must say though that I always use the handbrake when we are on site. I certainly don't want to be getting out of bed to put it on in a storm. I've never considered doing otherwise.

Edited by rovinmad
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I've noticed that some people leave their movers engaged. I've only done it accidentally. With a wheel lock and the mover on, the van isn't going to roll much! Just wonder if there's a downside for tyres and movers.

 

Regarding using the legs to stop the van moving I've had mine move in a gale enough to break a couple of the steady pads I had fitted. I can't remember if the handbrake was on but there was a wheel lock on one side.

 

At home I usually have the handbrake off. But all the vans at sales outlets have them on and often the steadies are up.

 

I must say though that I always use the handbrake when we are on site. I certainly don't want to be getting out of bed to put it on in a storm. I've never considered doing otherwise.

Leaving the mover engaged to the tyre will eventually distort the tyre cords and could weaken the mover springs (manual type)

2013(13) Sorento KX2 2. 2 Diesel Manual, (With smelling clutch) Glittering Metal (Metallic Grey) dragging a 2020 Coachman VIP 520 with a Powrtouch Evolution Motor Mover (Towing @ 80. 0%) :)

 

1288275170_2019VIP.jpg.775f2d8ce7b26db242e04a2e77903cd0.jpg

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  • 4 weeks later...

FIrst trip since November last year hitch up handbrake released slowly pull forwards no sticking manoved out of storage position with a little reversing thrown in, then hitch up properly with ATC set off after a 5 min drive check drums a little warm, arrived at site checked drums quite cool.

 

Thanks all.

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  • 3 months later...

while on my drive and not in use i have the van on axle stands to give wheels etc a rest also all legs down and hadbrake off and jockey hidden inside for extra security

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Hi John,

 

I do know what you mean! Always did my own work on all my vehicles, but I suppose being in engineering myself it was easier for me than to pay others to do it. I used to be in the RAF maintaining Hercules C130 aircraft. I am now living in France and servicing caravans as part of my living. I understand that some of the larger companies may take shortcuts/not do the work correctly (I have unfortunately had this experienced myself on one of my vehicles) so doing it yourself (if done correctly) if warranty issues is not a problem. Gas safety checks etc unless qualified do not attempt yourself.

 

I hope you get a satisfactory result when you next visit your dealer.

 

Regards

 

Mark

I have got the van back and they have put new springs in, fixed the toilet and done an excellent job of repairing the internal wall that they damaged.

 

Not had the opportunity to test anything yet.

 

John

Volvo V70 D3 SE (was Peugeot 4007, SsangYong Korando), Pulling a Lunar Clubman SI 2015. If you are depressed, you are living in the past. If you are anxious, you are living in the future. If you are at peace, you are living in the present.

 

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My task today is to try and release the seized up brakes on the car trailer. Foolishly I did not leave them off when it was parked up two months ago so I now have to jack the thing up to remove the wheel, back off the adjuster, then try to pull off the drum and clean out any residual rust, before lubrication, reassembly and readjustment. All of that is a real faff that would have been avoided had I done what I normally do and left the brakes off while it was stored.

I completely agree with the OP regarding a caravan in storage in close proximity to others should be prevented from moving but there are effective ways to achieve this other than using the brakes - which in my opinion should not be left applied for long periods.

Gordon

Fourwinds Hurricane 31D Motorhome. Also MGTF135 1. 8i Roadster (fun) & Volvo V70 3.2Ltr LPG (everyday car)
Unless otherwise stated, my posts will be my personal thoughts and have the same standing as any other member of Caravan Talk.

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  • 1 month later...

You take your caravan that far? ;)

 

The Alko wheel lock must help those of us who leave the handbrake off.

I agree - an unexpected bonus!

"its not the space in your Caravan, it's the space your Caravan is in, that counts"

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My twin axle is in storage and close proximity, as with most caravans if the corner steadies are firmly down, not just resting on the ground, and the jockey wheel was down I doubt it moving in the wind would be a problem. Leaving the handbrake on is not a good idea for all of the reasons mentioned.

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Cheaper and cheaper components being used in cars and other vehicles is becoming the norm.

 

Brake discs being an example, they rust overnight it seems.

 

Why not use stainless steel for discs as most motorbikes do?, because it saves the manufactures a couple of quid.

 

I asked my neighbour today why was there squealing screeching sound coming from his new BMW 5 Series (beautiful looking car it is too), he said that sometimes overnight the discs rust and he has to run the car to scrub the rust of the discs by using the brakes.

 

He accepts it for what it is, poor show as far as I am concerned, and pretty much all cars are going the same way, I only use a handbrake when I really have to (having an automatic transmission means that only rarely do I need the handbrake).

Edited by Sea&Sand
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Cheaper and cheaper components being used in cars and other vehicles is becoming the norm.

 

Brake discs being an example, they rust overnight it seems.

 

Why not use stainless steel for discs as most motorbikes do?, because it saves the manufactures a couple of quid.

 

I asked my neighbour today why was there squealing screeching sound coming from his new BMW 5 Series (beautiful looking car it is too), he said that sometimes overnight the discs rust and he has to run the car to scrub the rust of the discs by using the brakes.

 

He accepts it for what it is, poor show as far as I am concerned, and pretty much all cars are going the same way, I only use a handbrake when I really have to (having an automatic transmission means that only rarely do I need the handbrake).

I'm not sure that stainless would have the right properties, a lot of difference between a 2. 5 tonne car and a motorcycle. Good quality discs such as Brembo don't seem to suffer too badly.

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Perhaps interesting to note that Bailey recommend removing the van wheels if storing for more than a month, to avoid the tyres becoming distorted. Possibly, therefore, why there is no mention one way or another about leaving the handbrake on for long periods.

 

As has been said I know my car brakes will stick on after just one night in the garage if I have washed the car the night before. I've had a drum brake seize on and know what a problem it can be.



He accepts it for what it is, poor show as far as I am concerned, and pretty much all cars are going the same way, I only use a handbrake when I really have to (having an automatic transmission means that only rarely do I need the handbrake).

 

Hmmm. Even with an auto one should apply the handbrake on any sort of hill when stopped.

Mitsubishi ASX4

Interests, none worth mentioning. Just plain boring most of the time, and very boring the rest.

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Perhaps interesting to note that Bailey recommend removing the van wheels if storing for more than a month, to avoid the tyres becoming distorted. Possibly, therefore, why there is no mention one way or another about leaving the handbrake on for long periods.

 

As has been said I know my car brakes will stick on after just one night in the garage if I have washed the car the night before. I've had a drum brake seize on and know what a problem it can be.

 

Hmmm. Even with an auto one should apply the handbrake on any sort of hill when stopped.

 

 

There is on the Alko website under brake's, it's not a bailey chassis is it.

 

When parking, the handbrake lever MUST ALWAYS be engaged into the fully upright position (90°).

 

 

 

 

Update caravan moved the other day after 4 weeks with handbrake on, no problems what so ever, also to note while my van was in for service and repair at dealers for 6 weeks the hand brake was on, again no problems.

 

At storage the single axle next to me is left with hand brake off and 2 of the legs not down I've taken pictures and told the storage owner about it. I'm not happy but what can I do.

Edited by J1966
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That quote from Alko is simply about engaging the handbrake, not about leaving the handbrake on in storage.

Mitsubishi ASX4

Interests, none worth mentioning. Just plain boring most of the time, and very boring the rest.

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That quote from Alko is simply about engaging the handbrake, not about leaving the handbrake on in storage.

Yes, parking and storing are completely different.

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  • 2 weeks later...

That quote from Alko is simply about engaging the handbrake, not about leaving the handbrake on in storage.

 

 

 

Yes, parking and storing are completely different.

 

 

Well, I park my caravan in a storage compound, which ever way you cut it, it's still parked.

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Just read through this thread and interested to see the number of people who don't put their handbrake on because they use an Alko wheel lock. I always put my handbrake on because I use an Alko wheel lock as I feel any movement of the caravan could damage the lock or at least make it difficult to take off. I've had five caravans in the thirty-one years and never had the brakes stick on any of them, however reading this thread has got me worried as there is always a first time!

VW Tiguan R Line Tech and Eccles Topaz SE

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Just read through this thread and interested to see the number of people who don't put their handbrake on because they use an Alko wheel lock. I always put my handbrake on because I use an Alko wheel lock as I feel any movement of the caravan could damage the lock or at least make it difficult to take off. I've had five caravans in the thirty-one years and never had the brakes stick on any of them, however reading this thread has got me worried as there is always a first time!

Why not use four chocks?two on each wheel,no damage to wheel lock,easy to move,handbrake off,low cost,light to carry.

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Just read through this thread and interested to see the number of people who don't put their handbrake on because they use an Alko wheel lock. I always put my handbrake on because I use an Alko wheel lock as I feel any movement of the caravan could damage the lock or at least make it difficult to take off. I've had five caravans in the thirty-one years and never had the brakes stick on any of them, however reading this thread has got me worried as there is always a first time!

I'm with you Kayak. I have been caravanning for over 30 years and have had 4 vans and always leave the handbrake on - even when the van was in storage. Interestingly after following this thread I thought I would change and leave the handbrake off. A few days later I found the caravan burried in the drive gates. It had been very windy but the drive, at least where the caravan is parked is flat. Back to leaving the handbrake on.

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