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Rnclayton101

Honest Advice On Replacement Tow Car

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Was planning to change the tow car from a Chrysler Grand Voyager 3. 3 auto with LPG conversion during the next 2 yrs. I get an average 40mpg equivalent, and up to 50 on a run. Put the caravan on the back, and it really drops down to about 25. Gearbox is main issue. Drives everywhere in 3rd or even 2nd.

 

Just been made redundant, so I've got about 5k to spend. Want an SUV. Towing 1500kg fully laden.

 

Happy to switch to diesel. Fancied a Tiguan, but few and far between in my price range, especially with a tow bar already fitted. Really like the Touareg or Disco3, but probably couldn't afford to run them as my daily commute as well.

 

Seen a Freelander2 Td4e with stop/start. 2009 with 150k on the clock. Reviews on here only have autos. Any one got one of these in a manual?

 

What is real life solo and towing mpg.

 

Thanks in advance.

Edited by Rnclayton101

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Please be aware that many vehicles /components only have a design life of 150,000mls

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You'd get a really good Ssangyong Rexton for that money.

Friends had a freelander and had something go bad with the rear axle common issue I think but I don't know anymore.

I wouldn't be tempted to buy something with 150k on the clock experience tells me that is a ticking

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Previously had a manual FL2 - they are good tow cars. To answer your question we generally got 38 - 40 mpg solo and about 28 towing a 1,500kg van.

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Honest advice, your budget is too low to get a reliable suv type that will return 40mpg. A car with 150k is nearing the end of its life a expensive things will start to go wrong on a regular basis. I am sure loads of people will now tell me I am wrong as their 20 year old volvo with 250k on the clock is good as new, however there is good reason you don't see that many cars available with such high mileage.

 

If you don't need the 4x4 facility I would go with something like a mondeo or insignia. For 5k you should get a decent motor with lowish miles. Also inside both these cars are bigger than a freelander or any similar mid size suv. If you want suv because it sits taller then a S-max would also fit the bill nicely.

 

Alternatively something like a kia sorento would do you well however mpg is around 30mpg.

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You may get lucky, but you're expecting a lot for a high mileage SUV to be reliable, low cost to maintain and have decent MPG. There's a reason why those cars retain their value!

 

What about a Mondeo? If you must have 4x4 then perhaps a volvo xc70?

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Thanks for the advice. I prefer the higher car, having had an 807, Espace, and the Grand Voyager as my last cars. As we don't take a tent everywhere now, I don't need the extra space.

 

Understand the comments about the higher mileages. Always tried to buy a car around the 70-80k, but given the better requirements on cars, thought the higher mileages would have been ok, especially as most seem to be motorway mileage.

 

Some of these cars are less than 9yo. I know you take you chance with these things.

 

For instance, does a full Land Rover service history for a freelancer, bode better than a service history from an independent?

 

Thanks again for any advice.

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You can pick up a Kia Sorento 2009 for around £5k - we just traded ours in for a new (to us) Jeep Cherokee.

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We're on our 2nd Freelander2 manual. Both have been excellent, 100% fault free. We kept the first for 3 years and 40k, only changing because the deal we were offered was too good to be true. the current one is 4 years old and has done about 50k. About 37mpg on the computer overall, probably about 27 towing 1400kg. They make an excellent, stable towcar. As with most modern diesels they have a dual mass flywheel, which doesn't like being overheated by heavy clutch slipping, something to be aware of if you do a lot of low speed manoeuvring.

 

There are plenty of very good LR specialists outside the main dealer network, I trust mine more than any main dealer.

 

Would I buy one with 150k? It'd be taking too much of a chance for my liking, but I'd feel the same about any high mileage car, regardless of type.

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It is worth remembering that not all Freelanders are four wheel drive.

 

I was surprised to discover this when we were looking for a tow car in 2015.

 

Being a Land Rover I had made the assumption they all are but that was a mistaken assumption. Something to be aware of if looking at one at the cheaper end of the market.

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Please be aware that many vehicles /components only have a design life of 150,000mls

 

 

Honest advice, your budget is too low to get a reliable suv type that will return 40mpg. A car with 150k is nearing the end of its life a expensive things will start to go wrong on a regular basis. I am sure loads of people will now tell me I am wrong as their 20 year old volvo with 250k on the clock is good as new, however there is good reason you don't see that many cars available with such high mileage.

 

If you don't need the 4x4 facility I would go with something like a mondeo or insignia. For 5k you should get a decent motor with lowish miles. Also inside both these cars are bigger than a freelander or any similar mid size suv. If you want suv because it sits taller then a S-max would also fit the bill nicely.

 

Alternatively something like a kia sorento would do you well however mpg is around 30mpg.

 

The above comments are, I think, really not true. Go to a country where cars do not rust away and you will see many many cars with mega miles on them. 150k miles on a diesel is nothing, look at the mileage on HGV's some of them do that mileage a year not a lifetime.

 

As with any second hand purchase, the vehicle needs to be checked thoroughly for signs of rust, and always buy a car with a full service history. DO NOT rely on the stamps in a service book, buy a car with all previous bills, then you will see the full history of the car.

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The above comments are, I think, really not true. Go to a country where cars do not rust away and you will see many many cars with mega miles on them. 150k miles on a diesel is nothing, look at the mileage on HGV's some of them do that mileage a year not a lifetime.

 

As with any second hand purchase, the vehicle needs to be checked thoroughly for signs of rust, and always buy a car with a full service history. DO NOT rely on the stamps in a service book, buy a car with all previous bills, then you will see the full history of the car.

 

 

What have HGVs got to do with anything we are talking about cars?

 

Rust is not the big killer of cars and hasn't been for the last 20 odd years. A well maintained engine should last many years but its not just the engine its everything bolted to it that doesn't last, alternator, DMF, clutch, starter motor, power steering pump, idler pulley, fuel pump. .....all things i have had to replace on cars with over 100,000 miles.

 

AS for other countries what ones are you talking about? The countries which cant afford to import new cars so just keep the old ones running or places such as S. Africa or america where towns are 100s- 1000s miles apart on long open roads which put considerably less stress and wear on cars than driving round england.

Edited by tom_1989

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Having had a number of cars over the years, I would recommend a Honda CRV MK111 Diesel 2. 2.

We have only just let ours go, ( with regret ) to the daughter as we have a larger caravan now.

We now have a newer Santa Fe which is great. It was all we could find that was Honda like, heavier with bigger engine, for a 1600 kg caravan

 

The Honda CRV 2008 we had was an ES, 4x4, manual, reversing camera Sat Nav. Kerb weight 1647 kg. Towed MTPLM of 1500kgs without issue. 91% match.

France and back 1500 miles and averaged 30. 7 towing. Largest boot in its class. Drives like a car.

 

If I ever end up with a lighter van it will be back to the CRV.

 

Price will be the tough point, but not impossible privately.

 

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As someone who mainly buys cars with 100k +, my advice would be find one that has been looked after and you can still have may years trouble free as long as regular servicing is maintained. Personally I believe cars can fail at anytime after 4-5 years even at low mileages just depends how they have been treated/serviced, unless its under three years its always going to be a risk.

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Can always consider a hyundai Terracan, very reliable and some low mileage examples around. 2006 on manuals still in lower tax bracket. May not have all the bells and whistles but very reliable, great for towing and pretty sensible mpg. Ours averaged 24mpg with 1800kgs on the back on a drive from Kent to Brighton at 55mph.

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Again, thanks for the comments. Definitely food for thought.

 

I know there are sites to check specific models against caravans, does anyone know of where I could input the caravan weight, and get a list of make and specific models that could deal with it?

 

Was thinking of writing an app to do just that, but don't know if there is one already around.

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For most of my million plus miles driving life I have run vehicles sub £500!!!

In 1992 I made a massive hike in our car buying budget to an astronomical £4000 as I wanted to drive to the southern med.

Of course high mileage older vehicles need regular maintenance but they can be reliable eg

our straight six diesel series 5 clocked Beemer did 100000 miles with us probably had done 150000 when I got it.

Our Audi 80 2 litre petrol did 200000 miles and was still only needing new brake pipes.

 

On a budget I would avoid 4x4s like the plague!!

Why?

4 drive shafts

2 diffs

2 clutches

8 CV joints

 

plus absolutely no slip on the road leads to a constant strain on the drive train!

 

Deep pockets required on high mileage 4x4s

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For most of my million plus miles driving life I have run vehicles sub £500!!!

In 1992 I made a massive hike in our car buying budget to an astronomical £4000 as I wanted to drive to the southern med.

Of course high mileage older vehicles need regular maintenance but they can be reliable eg

our straight six diesel series 5 clocked Beemer did 100000 miles with us probably had done 150000 when I got it.

Our Audi 80 2 litre petrol did 200000 miles and was still only needing new brake pipes.

 

On a budget I would avoid 4x4s like the plague!!

Why?

4 drive shafts

2 diffs

2 clutches

8 CV joints

 

plus absolutely no slip on the road leads to a constant strain on the drive train!

 

Deep pockets required on high mileage 4x4s

Sorry but alot of this is just not true the FL2 drives in 2 wheel drive 99% of the time, only when front wheel slip is detected does the haldex send drive to the rear wheels.

 

I, like most people on here, have no idea if a 150k FL2 would be a cost effective drive. If I were the OP I would have a chat with a friendly LR inde specialist who actaully knows what they are taking about.

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I had an 2011 FL manual from new, towed our 1500kg fine I did get about 38/39 mpg normal driving but It was disappointing in reliability. Also after I bought it I was advised the clutch can be a problem when doing a lot of towing, but I did not have a problem with my clutch but I was very careful.

 

If you are looking for a cheap but reliable strong tow car look at the Mitsubishi Shogun Sport. I had one built live a tank only got about 30/31mpg but an unstoppable large car. Just had a quick look on auto-trader 5 cars on with less than 60k on them.

 

I hope you find something nice.

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I think with those requirements and budget,I'd be looking closely at a CRV. If you wanted to go as new as possible and could stretch the budget a bit,what about a Korando?Might get one with a bit of the warranty left.

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What have HGVs got to do with anything we are talking about cars?

 

Rust is not the big killer of cars and hasn't been for the last 20 odd years. A well maintained engine should last many years but its not just the engine its everything bolted to it that doesn't last, alternator, DMF, clutch, starter motor, power steering pump, idler pulley, fuel pump. .....all things i have had to replace on cars with over 100,000 miles.

 

AS for other countries what ones are you talking about? The countries which cant afford to import new cars so just keep the old ones running or places such as S. Africa or america where towns are 100s- 1000s miles apart on long open roads which put considerably less stress and wear on cars than driving round england.

My point is that HGV's are not any more mechanically tougher than a car engine, and from your comment in the second paragraph, you would write a car off fr the cost of a new alternator, starter motor, clutch or starter motor? You must get rid of some really good cars for a cost of the above components.

 

Other countries, try a holiday in Madeira and have a taxi. Many of the older Mercedes taxis have well over 3-400000km on them and bearing in mind that is on an island which does get snow and cold weather.

 

Maybe not all of us are as well off and need to look at cars with high mileage, but it is not a firghtener, the car just needs to be looked at more thoroughly.

Edited by Ovccruiser

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My point is that HGV's are not any more mechanically tougher than a car engine, and from your comment in the second paragraph, you would write a car off fr the cost of a new alternator, starter motor, clutch or starter motor? You must get rid of some really good cars for a cost of the above components.

 

Other countries, try a holiday in Madeira and have a taxi. Many of the older Mercedes taxis have well over 3-400000km on them and bearing in mind that is on an island which does get snow and cold weather.

 

Maybe not all of us are as well off and need to look at cars with high mileage, but it is not a firghtener, the car just needs to be looked at more thoroughly.

 

Without trying to go too off topic, lorrys are a lot lot tougher than a car engine everything is made bigger and heavier and they only rev to around 2500rpm which is why they have so many gears. A lorry can easily clock up 500,000 miles without too much trouble.

 

I have only recently been in a position to buy newer cars before that pretty much all my cars had over 100,000 miles and they cost me money in repairs, fortunately i was able to to do most repairs myself to keep costs down but the fact is things start to go wrong as they get older and worn out regardless how well looked after its been. All those things i have mentioned in my previous post are all fair wear and tear items but still amount to a breakdown at the side of the road.

 

Personally it doesn't bother me sitting on the side of the road for a few hours once or twice a year because its something that comes with running older higher mileage cars. However if i am away with work and its my wife and kids stranded on the side of the motorway that is a whole different issue.

 

For the OP it comes down to what they want out of the car and what compromises they are willing to make but IMO for 5k there are 3 broad options. 1) high mileage SUV that does 40mpg. 2) Lowish mileage SUV but low 30s MPG . 3) Lowish mileage people carrier or large car which returns good MPG.

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A lorry has so many gears because of the torque it has to create and is nothing to do with the revs. Most lorries I have driven easily got to 4000rpm, but because of the weight they have to pull use a lot more gears, like the difference when you have your caravan on the back of the car.

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Personally it doesn't bother me sitting on the side of the road for a few hours once or twice a year because its something that comes with running older higher mileage cars. However if i am away with work and its my wife and kids stranded on the side of the motorway that is a whole different issue.

 

Must be unlucky, I've only broken down twice in twenty years of high milers!

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Without trying to go too off topic, [/quote

 

Not off topic, just a different opinion.

 

 

For the OP it comes down to what they want out of the car and what compromises they are willing to make but IMO for 5k there are 3 broad options. 1) high mileage SUV that does 40mpg. 2) Lowish mileage SUV but low 30s MPG . 3) Lowish mileage people carrier or large car which returns good MPG.

 

These were my thoughts as well.

 

Having had 3 people carriers, fancy a change, but still worth looking at.

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