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David P

New To D S L R

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Hi all new here to this thread. After some 40 years with celluloid photography, and video work, I have made the transition to the world of digital. As my 60th was in December, and also with Christmas, I put the money towards a new camera and lenses!

With the telephoto lens, I thought I would try some distance shots. As a first I am happy with the results. A long way to go but a huge learning curve ahead.

post-78960-0-92227600-1483732556_thumb.jpg

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Wow that's fabulous picture of the moon. What camera and lens combination and settings were used for this picture.

Andrew

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Hi David. I was also a late starter with digital cameras having used 35mm B&W,Colour Reversal and straight colour from the late 50's and Ilford 125.

The image that you have posted looks as though it was taken through a powerful telescope or a massive mirror lens mounted on a bolted-down tripod.

My first digital camera was a Fuji FinePix S5700 - I have since added a further two - both Fuji FinePix in the form of an S8000 and an S4200.

I still have my 35mm SLR's and in particular my Yashica 230AF's with a range of lenses.

 

The thing that I find a pain is the digital lag that occurs when attempting to capture moving subjects unless of course shutter priority is selected with an extremely fast shutter speed and then there is a big risk of blurring of the items that are static.

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Wow that's fabulous picture of the moon. What camera and lens combination and settings were used for this picture.

Andrew

 

Hi David. I was also a late starter with digital cameras having used 35mm B&W,Colour Reversal and straight colour from the late 50's and Ilford 125.

The image that you have posted looks as though it was taken through a powerful telescope or a massive mirror lens mounted on a bolted-down tripod.

My first digital camera was a Fuji FinePix S5700 - I have since added a further two - both Fuji FinePix in the form of an S8000 and an S4200.

I still have my 35mm SLR's and in particular my Yashica 230AF's with a range of lenses.

 

The thing that I find a pain is the digital lag that occurs when attempting to capture moving subjects unless of course shutter priority is selected with an extremely fast shutter speed and then there is a big risk of blurring of the items that are static.

Hi both.

My DSLR setup consists of a Canon EOS 760D. Lenses are 18-135, 75-300, & 100-400 L.

The 760 is sold as body only in the UK. I was given the 75-300.

To take the moon shot I used this setting, using the 100-400 L, camera set at Auto ISO, at 1/250th. This was hand held!

I also have 2 Fuji cameras, one bridge and a compact. I wont ditch them?

In the sales I purchased 2 Go Pro action cameras, one for my son and I.

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Hi both.

My DSLR setup consists of a Canon EOS 760D. Lenses are 18-135, 75-300, & 100-400 L.

The 760 is sold as body only in the UK. I was given the 75-300.

To take the moon shot I used this setting, using the 100-400 L, camera set at Auto ISO, at 1/250th. This was hand held!

I also have 2 Fuji cameras, one bridge and a compact. I wont ditch them?

In the sales I purchased 2 Go Pro action cameras, one for my son and I.

 

I sold all my L lenses including 100-400 and got very good money for them but regretted it ever since.

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I sold all my L lenses including 100-400 and got very good money for them but regretted it ever since.

I bet you wish you had not. My son who is a pro has nothing but. 300mm prime lens, and more. He is getting his work published after a long time, but it is getting the reward, for the investment and patients. Me as a new be, I am only playing at it?

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That is a great picture David :)

 

I had the 50d and dust pump (100-400L) and used them for wildlife, then we got the dog and that was the end of any decent shots lol

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That is a great picture David :)

 

I had the 50d and dust pump (100-400L) and used them for wildlife, then we got the dog and that was the end of any decent shots lol

My brother in Law has the same pump, it was his suggestion, get the second generation with rotary zoom so that’s what I have, and hopefully no, or minimal dust problems??

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Great picture David. It shows the line of demarcation between day and night - this enables us to see the craters at this edge and feel the depth shown. Don't take a full moon picture as these partial moon shots are the best.

 

Congrats!

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Excellent moon shots, I found my DSLR kit too heavy

nowadays so use a Fuji X20 and a Lumix FZ1000.

Good luck in your future endeavours :)

Edited by gumdrop

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I bet you wish you had not. My son who is a pro has nothing but. 300mm prime lens, and more. He is getting his work published after a long time, but it is getting the reward, for the investment and patients. Me as a new be, I am only playing at it?

 

I had a couple of L primes also but my downfall really was doing a few weddings! Did them for close friends and then their friends and once you get past close friends it became a nightmare even though I only charged costs plus a bit. Couples, understandably, want 'the earth' on their special day(s). Anyway I now use a Sony RX10 which is an unusual camera really but a smashing lens and a lot less to carry!

Best to your son - not an easy path to take.

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Hi both.

My DSLR setup consists of a Canon EOS 760D. Lenses are 18-135, 75-300, & 100-400 L.

The 760 is sold as body only in the UK. I was given the 75-300.

To take the moon shot I used this setting, using the 100-400 L, camera set at Auto ISO, at 1/250th. This was hand held!

I also have 2 Fuji cameras, one bridge and a compact. I wont ditch them?

In the sales I purchased 2 Go Pro action cameras, one for my son and I.

Shutter speed should have read 1/1250th, my mistake, the ISO although, set to auto was actually 4000, f 5. 6. As I said new to this :-)

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Took this on my Canon 7D with the old Canon 100-400mm on my daughters farm in South Africa earlier this year. Tend to use my gopro 5 more just now. post-2641-0-43018500-1492806164_thumb.jpgpost-2641-0-43018500-1492806164_thumb.jpg

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Great picture David. It shows the line of demarcation between day and night - this enables us to see the craters at this edge and feel the depth shown. Don't take a full moon picture as these partial moon shots are the best.

 

Congrats!

 

 

Easy to get the Astrophotography bug once you start ?

 

Next is a 80 mm with a camera mount ?

 

Dave

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Hi Dave.

I have not got a scope :rolleyes: Some day. I have a very old Tasco, in the loft. I have some very good personal video I shot In the States of two shuttle launches, when on base. Taken with a canon video camera, with lens adapters. State of the art stuff some 15 years ago. (I need to get this stuff digitalised, for longevity)

Dave P

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As said there is a lot of detail that is defined in a partial moon as it shows the shadows and the more magnification the more detail you see .

 

 

 

Dave

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Excellent moon shots, I found my DSLR kit too heavy

nowadays so use a Fuji X20 and a Lumix FZ1000.

Good luck in your future endeavours :)

After years of building up a sizeable Nikon collection, I came to the same conclusion and bought a Fujifilm XT-1 last year. Great camera and top quality lenses but not the best kit for macro photography, sadly. So I've kept the Nikon D300 and some lenses for that. The DSLR still feels so reactive and positive compared with EVF mirrorless models like the XT-1 but the size and weight benefits are worth having.

 

Great moon pic, OP. Hand-held. .. well done.

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Wow that's fabulous picture of the moon.

Agreed but where's the other half????? :blush:

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Agreed but where's the other half????? :blush:

Mice eat it ?

 

When you see the half moon and you get the shadows you start to see the moon is not flat and has mountains upto 10,000 meters .

 

Dave

Edited by CommanderDave

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Agreed but where's the other half????? :blush:

 

She was in the kitchen, of course. :blush:

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Anyone who wants a bit of fun and information on their night sky download stellarium and you can see what will be in your sky at any given time .

 

 

Dave

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After years of building up a sizeable Nikon collection, I came to the same conclusion and bought a Fujifilm XT-1 last year. Great camera and top quality lenses but not the best kit for macro photography, sadly. So I've kept the Nikon D300 and some lenses for that. The DSLR still feels so reactive and positive compared with EVF mirrorless models like the XT-1 but the size and weight benefits are worth having.

 

Great moon pic, OP. Hand-held. . . well done.

 

The XT2 has significantly reduced the EVF black out time, making it much better for fast moving subjects than the XT1.

 

I don't find a problem with this momentary black out when shooting wideangle or static subjects. It's when I'm 'filling the frame' with a moving subject ( e. g. horse jumping, birds in flight) that the momentary black out can cause me to lose the subject framing, necessitating reframing and refocusing. I missed a lot of shots with the XT1. ..hoping for better with the XT2.

 

Like you, I ran Nikon and Fuji in parallel, mainly because of the limitations of the Fuji. But I decided recently to ditch my D750 and lenses to force me to make up my mind if 'lightweight trumped everything'. Too often, I found myself grabbing the Nikon, due to familiarity, rather than knuckling down and making the Fuji work.

 

Time will tell if I do fall in love with mirrorless or whether the many years using Nikon DSLRs will be too hard a habit to break. I am prepared to sell all my Fuji gear next year and go back to Nikon if I don't!

 

 

Apologies for thread drift.

 

Excellent moon shot . ..the partial light accentuates the craters beautifully.

 

I've only a few times tackled nightsky photography, the most recent lunar eclipse being one. (I struggle with the poor light scatter where I live. ...and the greater desire to be in bed!!)

 

So in contrast the full moon isn't as interesting.

 

I have a friend who photographs galaxies and nebulae and he's threatened to get me enthused when we visit him in the wilds later this year.

 

My lunar combo and one of his nebulae shots.

post-33147-0-40843400-1492940359_thumb.jpg

post-33147-0-28987500-1492940434_thumb.jpg

Edited by ericfield
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Astrophotography is very interesting as the night sky is something we take for granted and don't even stand for few minutes .

 

 

Your friend is a enthusiast with a reasonable scope usually using a tracking system . They show what is out there if you look . I have a computer controlled 127mm Maksutov-cassegrain myself which is a compressed reflector and the wife is a hobby photographer and she keeps asking for a camera mount .

 

 

I have good light conditions being on the edge of the New Forest but agree with Eric about bed calling especially in the winter months . I find it is not uncommon to see enthusiast setting up their telescope on sites because of the dark conditions being more rural .

 

 

A pair of binoculars and Stellarium is good starting point and can spark an interest in children even just looking and picking out constellations .

 

Dave

Edited by CommanderDave

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post-78960-0-41554800-1493147114_thumb.jpg

I took this about 45 mins ago in the back garden. Welsh valleys training ground for the US Marines!

Shutter speed 1/800, ISO 320, Aperture 5. 6, focal Length 400mm.

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attachicon.gifosprey. JPG

I took this about 45 mins ago in the back garden. Welsh valleys training ground for the US Marines!

Shutter speed 1/800, ISO 320, Aperture 5. 6, focal Length 400mm.

Are you near to the famed "Mach Loop" Dinas Mawddwy area then David? I remember the first time I was walking in that area enjoying the total tranquility when suddenly and without any prior warning the peace was ripped apart by a low flying jet fighter. I nearly hit the ground in fright!

Beautiful moon shot especially as it's hand held. You did say in your OP that you were new to your DSLR. I was wondering if you are aware of the recommendation that you turn off image stabilisation if mounting your camera on a tripod.

I only learned this after many slightly blurred shots of the Moon with my camera on a tripod. I still forget to do it sometimes though.

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