Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
gravon42

I've Had The Estimate (gulp!)

Recommended Posts

£13,770,76!! I think I can safely assume it will be written off. :( I intend to buy it

back and repair it. ............... I've got the paint! :rolleyes:

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Let us see what you are letting yourself in for!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yeh, it's the 76 pence that would have tipped it over the limit.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wow, have to say that's ridiculous. Why does everything relating to a caravan cost so blinking much? No wonder the insurance premiums are relatively high.

 

Let us know how you get on.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

£13,770,76!! I think I can safely assume it will be written off. :( I intend to buy it

back and repair it. ............... I've got the paint! :rolleyes:

What happened I must have missed your post?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

What happened I must have missed your post?

 

Poor Graham on 27th September

 

I quote:

Pulling into Newlands Caravan Park today, turned too sharply to the left, and hit a metal

gatepost. I have ripped the side of the van out. It has ripped and dented the door, and

a 2 ft. gash, that deep,it has dislodged the back of the wardrobe. Also damaged the wheel.

I have been in touch with the insurance company. It will need a complete new side. How

quickly are these accidents dealt with? I have never claimed on any insurance before.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

£13,770,76!! I think I can safely assume it will be written off. :( I intend to buy it

back and repair it. ............... I've got the paint! :rolleyes:

Surely with a 2013 caravan it would have been new for old insurance? If you repair it you may have an issue trying to insure the caravan unless you get an engineer's report stating that it is as original.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I thought it looked expensive from your pictures . They write caravans off just for hail damage because the cost of repair . Caravan and motorhome repairs are very costly and labour intensive .

 

I know when I needed a new side on a motorhome the repair company said it is going to need the outside removed any frame damage replaced that will need inside wall boards removed that will need internal bathroom walls removed and wardrobe and bunks. That's when he estimated £5k - £10k but he said it will be nearer £10 k and that was 10 years ago .

 

 

Dave

Edited by CommanderDave

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My recent damp repairs cost £2,000 and that was just removing and replacing relatively small amounts of wall and ceiling boarding in the washroom area so I suppose in the scheme of things. .....but still painful.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

£13,770,76!! I think I can safely assume it will be written off. :( I intend to buy it

back and repair it. ............... I've got the paint! :rolleyes:

That is a very expensive pot of paint. :rolleyes:

 

Best of luck.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Not my week! :( Put the car in for an MOT yesterday, and it failed on both number plate lights not working.

(Always check them regularly) "soon sort those, its only a fuse" said I "see you in an hour" :) Cut a long story

short, I now have the boot lid in bits, wires everywhere! In the meantime, the nearside rear light stopped

working, although the bulb was ok. O dear me! :angry: Ever heard of a field effect transistor??? :blink: Nor me!

Look it up. Been awake most of the night wondering how to solve it. I was going to wire it to the trailer socket

somehow. Switched the sidelights on this morning, and hey presto they all work! :D So now I am in the process

of putting it all back together. ;)

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

HELP! I don't understand how that works. The caravan is a write off so they pay him out. So what's this buying it back? How is that a good idea?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Toots, this is what happens, in theory, (hopefully!) The insurance company pay you the current market

value, which you can buy another caravan with. You can approach them and offer to buy it back at a much

lower price. You then use it as it, assuming it is road legal, and you are prepared to use it in that condition, or

get it repaired. In my circumstances I reckon I could repair it for X amount, thus saving a lot of money. I

hope it works like that! :)


Surely with a 2013 caravan it would have been new for old insurance? If you repair it you may have an issue trying to insure the caravan unless you get an engineer's report stating that it is as original.

 

Ian, went for market value,should have had NFO. I have mentioned re-insuring and with an engineers report, it

is possible.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Toots, this is what happens, in theory, (hopefully!) The insurance company pay you the current market

value, which you can buy another caravan with. You can approach them and offer to buy it back at a much

lower price. You then use it as it, assuming it is road legal, and you are prepared to use it in that condition, or

get it repaired. In my circumstances I reckon I could repair it for X amount, thus saving a lot of money. I

hope it works like that! :)

 

Right I hadn't appreciated that you could buy it for less than the pay out. Now it makes perfect sense. Good luck!

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Right I hadn't appreciated that you could buy it for less than the pay out. Now it makes perfect sense. Good luck!

T00ts

 

Without going into specific figures and cases, if the cost of repairs exceed say 50% of market value the insurers will probably write off the caravan. The caravan is then an asset with a residual value which, to mitigate their loss, the insurers will hope to sell for as much as possible which may be up to or even more than 60% of the market value. The insurers nett payout becomes 40% of market value. If the insured buys back the caravan from their payout they have the 40% left to repair their caravan. The chances of the insured buying a caravan in the same pre incident condition for the payout are very low.

Other guesstimates and generalisations are available. :rolleyes:

 

DeeTee

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Not my week! :( Put the car in for an MOT yesterday, and it failed on both number plate lights not working.

(Always check them regularly) "soon sort those, its only a fuse" said I "see you in an hour" :) Cut a long story

short, I now have the boot lid in bits, wires everywhere! In the meantime, the nearside rear light stopped

working, although the bulb was ok. O dear me! :angry: Ever heard of a field effect transistor??? :blink: Nor me!

Look it up. Been awake most of the night wondering how to solve it. I was going to wire it to the trailer socket

somehow. Switched the sidelights on this morning, and hey presto they all work! :D So now I am in the process

of putting it all back together. ;)

Oh the joys of modern car electrics! Most new cars are fitted with a body control interface (goes by many names) which control the functions of most things that have a switch on the dash/column. Citroen Peugeot were the first mainstream to adopt this bastorial system. The system needs to reset itself after changing a failed bulb, so new bulb in,light switch off, ignition off. Key out, lock door, go for a brew, come back and as if by magic it all works again.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Oh the joys of modern car electrics! Most new cars are fitted with a body control interface (goes by many names) which control the functions of most things that have a switch on the dash/column. Citroen Peugeot were the first mainstream to adopt this bastorial system. The system needs to reset itself after changing a failed bulb, so new bulb in,light switch off, ignition off. Key out, lock door, go for a brew, come back and as if by magic it all works again.

I can vouch for the Citroen "bastorial system" thing. I had a 2002 C5. Every so often the electrics went crazy. I found out that it could be reset but it required a weird process of switching things on and off in a definite order, including the drivers door window. Did not happen too often, otherwise a good car.

 

 

John

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Not my week! :( Put the car in for an MOT yesterday, and it failed on both number plate lights not working.

(Always check them regularly) "soon sort those, its only a fuse" said I "see you in an hour" :) Cut a long story

short, I now have the boot lid in bits, wires everywhere! In the meantime, the nearside rear light stopped

working, although the bulb was ok. O dear me! :angry: Ever heard of a field effect transistor??? :blink: Nor me!

Look it up. Been awake most of the night wondering how to solve it. I was going to wire it to the trailer socket

somehow. Switched the sidelights on this morning, and hey presto they all work! :D So now I am in the process

of putting it all back together. ;)

Thank heaven my mate has a garage. I haven't even changed a car bulb for donkey's years.

 

I'm just told "go make a brew", come back and it's all fixed. Still asked to do little plumbing jobs as quid pro quo.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

HELP! I don't understand how that works. The caravan is a write off so they pay him out. So what's this buying it back? How is that a good idea?

 

It used to happen a lot when I was in the motor trade, the car was wrote off (beyond economical repair) and they would buy it back, we would then repair it with parts from a dismantlers.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'd love to see the mess my OH would make trying to rebuild a caravan, bless him. His skills are many but on a practical level not a great deal. Even pegging the awning down I have to follow round to put the pegs at an angle because the ladders are slipping off.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'd love to see the mess my OH would make trying to rebuild a caravan, bless him. His skills are many but on a practical level not a great deal. Even pegging the awning down I have to follow round to put the pegs at an angle because the ladders are slipping off.

As long as he doesn't peg out whilst pegging down you will be OK. ;)

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

It used to happen a lot when I was in the motor trade, the car was wrote off (beyond economical repair) and they would buy it back, we would then repair it with parts from a dismantlers.

I think that still happens but it now goes on record as a category D.

 

examples here.

 

 

 

John

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Putting ours into storage the first time, the entrance is halfway round a blind bend and I managed to glance the hedge (didn't swing out far enough before turning in).

 

Luckily that was dealt with Tcut but would have been a lot worse if there was a post or bollard on the corner. .

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Had the written estimate today. :( Apparently they also have to remove the back panel £1034, the roof,

£1150, and everything associated with it! . Labour £50 an hour!.,,,,,,,,,soon mounts up!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  



×
×
  • Create New...