Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
tonykaren

Survived First Night

Recommended Posts

On site yesterday set up including awning with no dramas had a meal cooked in our new oven, had a good nights sleep, had a couple of artics pass on the way here that shook the caravan gets the heart rate going. See what the rest of the week has in store, not many people on site yet but everyone we have met has been really friendly and when they realise we are first timers are willing to pass on tips and advice. Of now for a walk along the beach

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well done.

Still remember our first night even though it was in the early 80's.

Woke up frozen, no heat, no gas, door frozen solid and wouldn't open.

Learn't the hard way that propane gas is needed for freezing conditions!

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well done, exciting isn't it. That was SWMBO and me just a few weeks ago, now having had our second few days away last weekend in some of the wetest conditions this year and coped we feel like 'old hands' now, as will you next time! :)

 

BH

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

the first time we went out our son and his partner came with us to show us what to do, they were a big help but we learned so much more when we did it on our own, at our own pace. That's the thing with caravanning, for us, there's no rush. There's always things to learn, hints and tips that other folk, whether they are on site or on a forum like this, are willing to share. I don't know what my life would be like now without the 'van and the dogs . ..and the OH .

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well done.

Still remember our first night even though it was in the early 80's.

Woke up frozen, no heat, no gas, door frozen solid and wouldn't open.

Learn't the hard way that propane gas is needed for freezing conditions!

 

Ours was so similar, I didn't know that I needed wooden chocks to wind on to. ....and my jockey wheel collapsed and a new one was needed before we could set off. ...

 

geoff

Edited by shipbroker
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well done, enjoy the rest of your weekend. Re Artics upsetting the outfit as they pass, a tip given to me was when you observe an LGV coming to overtake move closer to the offside white lines, this tends to make the LGV move across to his offside, then, as it passes allow your outfit to drift back closer to the nearside lines thus increasing the gap.

When it's you doing the overtaking keep well over to your offside as you pass and get ready for the air wave coming off the front of the truck which can make the outfit feel unsteady. If you're ready for it it's not such a drama.

So pleased it's going well for you.

TD

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Not so sure of "moving to the offside" is the best and safest advice, if you are concerned f Arctics you should move to the nearside to create extra space, moving to the offside making the Arctic do the same could cause an accident if on a three laned motorway

  • Like 6

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I keep beating the tyre pressure drum because tyre pressures make such a difference to stability. I also wouldn't advise moving out to get HGV drivers to do the same. Just stick with a steady speed and understand the physics involved.

An HGV is effectively a wall moving at speed which causes the air to compress and move to each side at high pressure. It will have an effect on the whole rig as it passes you or you pass it. The sideways blast of air will be felt almost level with the front of the HGV and will push you away slightly. You will feel this much less on the tow car than the van due to the sail area exposed to the blast. Initially you will feel it on the front side of the van which will try to push the van away, this will make the tow car feel like it's being pulled towards the HGV. As you move past the blast hits the rear side which will have the effect of pulling the car away from the HGV lane. The opposite effect is felt if the HGV is passing you. The effect should be minimal and moving away from the HGV to allow a bigger gap will reduce the effect. Don't worry, it is a normal effect.

Edited by Vanmaster Man
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well done. It gets easier!

We are off today, no doubt forget something as we usually do!!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I prefer to keep up with the lorries and wouldn't want them to move over towards me if I was passing them so if one wanted to pass me, usually when going down hill, I would keep to the nearside of my lane, I have a great deal of respect for lorries.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Got to say not sure what we were expecting, only been a couple of days and we have the bug, so much so just been and booked an extra 4 days. thanks to CT for all the tips and advice Our granddaughter so excited she was up at 6_30 wanting to go on the beach, convinced her we could at least wake up first, brings back so many memories of our boys, looking forward to making many more.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm off to Bruges tomorrow for a week and just can't wait. The thing is caravanning never ever loses it's appeal. It's your own home wherever you go.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I keep beating the tyre pressure drum because tyre pressures make such a difference to stability. I also wouldn't advise moving out to get HGV drivers to do the same. Just stick with a steady speed and understand the physics involved.

An HGV is effectively a wall moving at speed which causes the air to compress and move to each side at high pressure. It will have an effect on the whole rig as it passes you or you pass it. The sideways blast of air will be felt almost level with the front of the HGV and will push you away slightly. You will feel this much less on the tow car than the van due to the sail area exposed to the blast. Initially you will feel it on the front side of the van which will try to push the van away, this will make the tow car feel like it's being pulled towards the HGV. As you move past the blast hits the rear side which will have the effect of pulling the car away from the HGV lane. The opposite effect is felt if the HGV is passing you. The effect should be minimal and moving away from the HGV to allow a bigger gap will reduce the effect. Don't worry, it is a normal effect.

last time out we were overtaking a HGV and a high top white van man came speeding up the outside lane, thank goodness we have all those gadgets that stabilise the caravan, but I thought that the 'van was going to go, OH said I was over reacting and that everything was in control, which to be fair, it was all okay and we have been caravanning for years. The point that I am making is that no matter how long you've been caravanning there is always something new around the corner. happy days.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Not so sure of "moving to the offside" is the best and safest advice, if you are concerned f Arctics you should move to the nearside to create extra space, moving to the offside making the Arctic do the same could cause an accident if on a three laned

Take your point.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Haven't caravans changed over the years? Our first one had just 2 gas lamps for light. And only cold water which you drew out of the jerry can by means of a foot pump on the floor of the van, There was a hob (no oven) and water was boiled on the hob when you wanted it hot. Windows were glass - no double glazing - and the only privacy at night was fabric curtains.

 

When we changed to a more modern van with electric lighting, the first thing we noticed was the silence - no hissing from gas mantles.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Haven't caravans changed over the years? Our first one had just 2 gas lamps for light. And only cold water which you drew out of the jerry can by means of a foot pump on the floor of the van, There was a hob (no oven) and water was boiled on the hob when you wanted it hot. Windows were glass - no double glazing - and the only privacy at night was fabric curtains.

 

When we changed to a more modern van with electric lighting, the first thing we noticed was the silence - no hissing from gas mantles.

the people on the pitch next to us remarked about his first caravan exactly what you have stated change can be good lol

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Looking forward to my first night in our 2 berth, plus our first official winter night in the caravan. Had many a seasonal pitch but never on an open all year site, hard to come by.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...