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Cycle Lane Dilemma

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Rule 268

Do not overtake on the left or move to a lane on your left to overtake. In congested conditions, where adjacent lanes of traffic are moving at similar speeds, traffic in left-hand lanes may sometimes be moving faster than traffic to the right. In these conditions you may keep up with the traffic in your lane even if this means passing traffic in the lane to your right. Do not weave in and out of lanes to overtake.

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Rule 268

Do not overtake on the left or move to a lane on your left to overtake. In congested conditions, where adjacent lanes of traffic are moving at similar speeds, traffic in left-hand lanes may sometimes be moving faster than traffic to the right. In these conditions you may keep up with the traffic in your lane even if this means passing traffic in the lane to your right. Do not weave in and out of lanes to overtake.

 

 

 

Whoops, wrong thread

 

Well I am in Cyprus and on my iPad, that's my lame excuse

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I used to have a Cycling Nazi on my work journey. He had cameras all over his bike and his helmet. Im sure he was looking for what he considered to be issues and getting knocked off would probably make his day.

 

Id often see him stood rowing with a motorist at the side of the road.

 

It worked for me. I used to give him a wide berth and purposely keep a big distance between us if I was unfortunate to get stuck behind him on a long uphill winding section where overtaking was difficult. Often a procession of horn honking motorists would form behind me.

 

Ive retired now

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Here in London on the back roads with buildings right up to the corners, cyclists have this habit of cutting corners and entering the road on the wrong side!

I have lost count of the times, as I approach the junction, I am confronted with a cyclist heading for my bonnet.

So far they have seen me and gone into panic mode, making a huge correction!

One day I expect I'll be picking one off my bonnet, but I wonder who will get the blame and more to the point who will pay for the damage.

Similar thing happens at a local roundabout. Cyclists who are turning left don't slow down or stop and treat it as a kink in the road and then just swing out onto the roundabout in front of the traffic. Seen a few near misses and one of the reasons I fitted a dash camera.

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yes - I meant your response

 

Thanks for the clarification - I considered it an appropriate response based on the feedback received from the cyclist ;)

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Steve, don't be silly. If you're a motorist, you're in the wrong. If You're a cyclist you're ALWAYS right. (Even if you ride through red traffic signals or ride the wrong way up a one-way street or cycle on the pavement.)

Unless you can actually apprehend them, they are invisible, invulnerable and, of course, ALWAYS RIGHT.

 

 

Thanks for the clarification - I considered it an appropriate response based on the feedback received from the cyclist ;)

 

That's the first, last and only law of the road for (some) cyclists.

 

Mike

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Thanks for the clarification - I considered it an appropriate response based on the feedback received from the cyclist ;)

please don't thank me. I don't think it was appropriate. Where did you leave your car?

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Sadly this has degenerated into the usual Cyclist versus Motorist debate in which attempts are made to produce an overall winner.

The truth is nearer to the fact that there are idiots in both camps and you could include lorry drivers, van man and any other group of road user.

In fact the most courteous group I come across are horse riders but some one will undoubtably say neigh.

:)

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please don't thank me. I don't think it was appropriate. Where did you leave your car?

 

I don't really care if you do or don't think it was appropriate, but just to humour you, I left the car after the point I asked him very politely to move, I got a load of totally uncalled for verbal abuse, at which point a got out of the car.

 

 

. and before you ask, yes I would have moved him and his bike had he not scarpered. :(

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I don't really care if you do or don't think it was appropriate, but just to humour you, I left the car after the point i asked him very politely to move, I got a load of totally uncalled for verbal abuse, at which point a got out of the car.

 

 

. and befor you ask, yes I would have moved him and his bike had he not scarpered. :(

ah. I thought as you had posted about it on a forum that you were inviting comment. Apologies for misinterpreting you. I was actually wondering where you left your car; presumably where it wasn't adding to the problem

 

I'm glad you didn't 'move' him as that could have ended badly in so many ways.

 

It's easy to get wound up by people without good manners though so I do understand. And it' much easier to say "just ignore it" than it is to do!

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Coutesy and common sense are stressed in the Highway Code. Obstruction is an offence and the cyclist was deliberatley obstructing the flow fo traffic.

The relative post indicated to me that the cyclist was hesitating in the box until he was confident that it was safe for him to proceed.

Edited by DeeTee
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I think it was a rhetorical question-like "what if pigs could fly?"

 

 

 

 

I can and have done since I was 16

 

kot

pigs

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The relative post indicated to me that the cyclist was hesitating in the box until he was confident that it was safe for him to proceed.

Of course it did!

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I used to have a Cycling Nazi on my work journey. He had cameras all over his bike and his helmet. Im sure he was looking for what he considered to be issues and getting knocked off would probably make his day.

 

Id often see him stood rowing with a motorist at the side of the road.

 

It worked for me. I used to give him a wide berth and purposely keep a big distance between us if I was unfortunate to get stuck behind him on a long uphill winding section where overtaking was difficult. Often a procession of horn honking motorists would form behind me.

 

Ive retired now

10/10 for giving him a wide berth, it's a good idea doing that for all cyclists too.

 

As a driver and cyclist, I've had good advice from many friends of both persuasions over the years.

 

As a driver, the best advice I've had on dealing with cyclists, is to imagine they are your mother. How closely would you want to speed past your mother, knowing she may hit a bump and wobble?

 

As a cyclist, one piece of advice I had was to train up in self defence, to deal with the drivers who will one day get out of their car and remonstrate with you. Not all of them, obviously - some could be merely encouraging you in one way or another - only the aggressive ones.

 

I took both pieces of advice, and I'm proud to say, I've never hit a cyclist. ..

 

[PS: I've never actually "hit" a driver, either, despite a couple getting physical with me]

Edited by Rolling Stone
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10/10 for giving him a wide berth, it's a good idea doing that for all cyclists too.

 

As a driver and cyclist, I've had good advice from many friends of both persuasions over the years.

 

As a driver, the best advice I've had on dealing with cyclists, is to imagine they are your mother. How closely would you want to speed past your mother, knowing she may hit a bump and wobble?

 

As a cyclist, one piece of advice I had was to train up in self defence, to deal with the drivers who will one day get out of their car and remonstrate with you. Not all of them, obviously - some could be merely encouraging you in one way or another - only the aggressive ones.

 

I took both pieces of advice, and I'm proud to say, I've never hit a cyclist. ..

 

[PS: I've never actually "hit" a driver, either, despite a couple getting physical with me]

 

I give them all a wide berth to be honest. Im no cyclist but I have a bike and use it occasionally

Some of them would test the patience of a saint especially those that ride 2 or 3 abreast. ...they might be within their rights bit theres no need for it and all they do is slow down other road users. It doesnt particlarly bother me, Im retired and rarely late for anything but even I could be making an emergency trip to a hospital.

 

PS My mother died many years ago so that wouldnt work

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I give them all a wide berth to be honest. Im no cyclist but I have a bike and use it occasionally

Some of them would test the patience of a saint especially those that ride 2 or 3 abreast. ...they might be within their rights bit theres no need for it and all they do is slow down other road users. It doesnt particlarly bother me, Im retired and rarely late for anything but even I could be making an emergency trip to a hospital.

 

PS My mother died many years ago so that wouldnt work

The view generally held by many "serious" cyclists (not me) is that it's better and safer if you occupy the lane, rather than keeping left. The former means you are treated like a vehicle, albeit slower than cars - and is likely to cause anger and irritation; the latter sadly can be an invitation for drivers to squeeze past the cyclist, not giving them enough safe clearance, and can result in injury.

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The view generally held by many "serious" cyclists (not me) is that it's better and safer if you occupy the lane, rather than keeping left. The former means you are treated like a vehicle, albeit slower than cars - and is likely to cause anger and irritation; the latter sadly can be an invitation for drivers to squeeze past the cyclist, not giving them enough safe clearance, and can result in injury.

I find that on the few occasions that I have to use the main carriageway (ie when there is no dedicated cycle lane, or alternative quieter road) I tend to ride just outside of the potholes and drains! That usually puts me just under a metre from the edge. When turning right I always indicate and pull across to occupy the centre of the right turn lane but always pull to the left again once the manoeuvre is completed. Similarly when turning left I will ease very slightly further out into the road so that my left arm indicating my intention to turn is not above the footpath or grass verge; I generally do not occupy the centre of the lane. At traffic lights, where there is a designated cycle area across the entire lane width, if the lights are red I will always use this zone but when the lights change pull back to the nearside as soon as practical.

 

It's all about making myself as visible as possible and clearly indicating my intentions to other road users, while showing respect for others and allowing them to pass me safely. I would only ever ride two abreast on a wide cycle track or quiet country lane; it's just too dangerous for all concerned on busier roads. I do not condone riding "in a pack" to occupy the entire lane as I see that as pure selfishness on the part of cyclists, and encourages motorists to take chances in overtaking.

 

Gordon.

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I do not condone riding "in a pack" to occupy the entire lane as I see that as pure selfishness on the part of cyclists, and encourages motorists to take chances in overtaking.

I think the same applies to caravans - we would never travel as a "pack", would we? I can imagine the comments from car drivers wanting to "get on" if there were a group of 20 caravans moving as one body along a normal road (or perhaps forming a solid block of 3 lanes on a 4-lane motorway) while keeping up a steady 50 mph. But it would be legal, would it not, just like our cycling fiends (sorry, fingr slipped,- "friends") in their groups.

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The view generally held by many "serious" cyclists (not me) is that it's better and safer if you occupy the lane, rather than keeping left. The former means you are treated like a vehicle, albeit slower than cars - and is likely to cause anger and irritation; the latter sadly can be an invitation for drivers to squeeze past the cyclist, not giving them enough safe clearance, and can result in injury.

 

That is what we teach our young cyclists to do on the National Cycle Training Standard's 'Bikeability' course, the replacement for Cycling Proficiency. It's all spelled out in John Franklin's book, 'Cyclecraft'. Unfortunately, the Government, in its wisdom, only seems to be educating cyclists, not other road users. Don't be surprised to find a 10-year-old cyclist taking a position in front of you as they turn right or left, or pass a parked vehicle with enough room to avoid an opening door. :o

 

Before you get agitated about being held up, remember the roads are to share safely, remember your duty of care to vulnerable road users, however old and grumpy you are, however late you are and however many kilowatts you have available under your right toe. :ph34r:

 

Cycle Instructors; the Lone Rangers of road users. B)

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Before you get agitated about being held up, remember the roads are to share safely, remember your duty of care to vulnerable road users, however old and grumpy you are, however late you are and however many kilowatts you have available under your right toe. :ph34r:

 

Cycle Instructors; the Lone Rangers of road users. B)

 

You are right it is about sharing the road safely, it is also about consideration for other road users and that is not a one way thing, but unfortunately there are cyclists out there that think it is.

 

I will always give cyclists wobble room and room to manouvre, but what i don't understand are those cyclist that think they are invincible, they don't ride like someone that has nothing around them tor protection, except the law, yet they tangle with cars, lorries, HGV, and buses with inpunity.

 

The other thing that amazes me is the "Switch", you know, the one that is thrown the second the car driver gets on a bike.

They go from steady Joe who drives around minding their own business just getting on with their journey, to become the incensed lycra loony that sees every vehicle as the enemy and every other road user as someone to challenge.

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You are right it is about sharing the road safely, it is also about consideration for other road users and that is not a one way thing, but unfortunately there are cyclists out there that think it is.

 

I will always give cyclists wobble room and room to manouvre, but what i don't understand are those cyclist that think they are invincible, they don't ride like someone that has nothing around them tor protection, except the law, yet they tangle with cars, lorries, HGV, and buses with inpunity.

 

The other thing that amazes me is the "Switch", you know, the one that is thrown the second the car driver gets on a bike.

They go from steady Joe who drives around minding their own business just getting on with their journey, to become the incensed lycra loony that sees every vehicle as the enemy and every other road user as someone to challenge.

it was my working assumption that they were like thay in the car too!

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The view generally held by many "serious" cyclists (not me) is that it's better and safer if you occupy the lane, rather than keeping left. The former means you are treated like a vehicle, albeit slower than cars - and is likely to cause anger and irritation; the latter sadly can be an invitation for drivers to squeeze past the cyclist, not giving them enough safe clearance, and can result in injury.

 

Personally I have no problem with cyclists taking up a position to "occupy" the lane and be treated like any other 'vehicle'. The trouble is, when it comes to traffic lights, they want to be treated as "cyclists" so they can go to the head of the queue (if they bother to stop) at red lights thereby allowing them to set off first slowing everyone down again until it's safe to pass them again. This results in driving for miles across London at the speed of a cyclist even when it's not too busy. Very frustrating when you are in an HGV.

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Totally ignored the dedicated cycle path.

what an idiot!

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what an idiot!

 

Who, the bus driver, the cyclist or me ;)

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