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BillySmart

Vehicle Rescue Organisation - What Is A Fair Call Out?

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Oh and I use copper grease too, if it was good enough for my late father who was a Rolls Royce cars trained engineer its good enough for me.

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I'd call mayday if I was somewhere that wasn't safe to change a wheel otherwise I'd do it myself, I carry a snap-on knuckle bar for the studs and the mover and a dead blow hammer for knocking wheels off as well as knocking the windbreak poles in.

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Entered a fast learning curve last night when I experienced a shunt in my vehicle. Called the rescue service to be told accidents are not a breakdowm so as Winston Wolf says " on your bike buster" Will rembrr that in the future when renewing my service provider.

Mayday (Green Flag) will cover recovery if the car is undriveable folowing an accident - but Green Flag Direct doesn't - your fully comp car insurance should cover car recovery following an immobilising accident but they won't take the caravan if you're towing!

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Using Copperslip with a stainless bolt and alloy frame caused the alloy to do a disappearing trick when salt water is concerned, seeing as I live by a salt water loch and the council enjoy spreading salt like it's gone out of fashion only for it to rain I'll let the copper grease have a bye, though I use it on the brakes. :)

Now coating the stainless bolt in iodine before screwing into alloy that is worth it, copper and aluminium do make a battery but not one of the best with salt water.

For the last 40 years at the garage I run we have always copper slipped the hub/ wheel and never had problems with cars we see year in year out, one of the biggest problems with car wheel/ brakes seizing is the use of high pressure washers used by the "car wash" places that have sprung up everywhere, this forces water were it should not be able to get

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I repair motorcycles for a living, steel into aluminium corrosion and the problems it causes are a big part of that

 

Steel pad retaining pins into aluminium brake calipers and steel bolts into aluminium engine cases in the UK climate are always prone to siezing together.

 

The answer is coppa-slip as everyone has already said.

 

Taking all the wheels off yourself and cleaning/ smearing the mounting collars with 'slip is a very good idea imho.

 

I've had to get a mallet on the back side of car (and some bike) wheels to free them off.

 

A "cracking bar", 1/2 inch from Halfords (£25) and suitable socket will remove all wheel nuts no matter how tight. Tyre fitters like to windy gun them on which make removal difficult due to the torque on the nuts.

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Not had the pleasure of a puncture for quite a while but would definitely call out a recovery service to chamge a wheel on the car.

Whoever designed the chocolate teapot of a scissor jack supplied by Land Rover was having a larf ! :blink:

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Entered a fast learning curve last night when I experienced a shunt in my vehicle. Called the rescue service to be told accidents are not a breakdowm so as Winston Wolf says " on your bike buster" Will rembrr that in the future when renewing my service provider

Three weeks ago I had to mount a kerb to avoid a collision, puncturing and writing off two tyres in doing so. So I called out Green Flag and the telephone operator summarised the call as my car having two flat tyres following an accident, She then told me that they would attend and recover my vehicle. Maybe different companies have different rules?

Regards,

Ian.

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. ....Do others feel changing a wheel is justification for calling out your breakdown service?

Asbsolutely.

 

Years back in my university days I couldn't afford the extra cost of

breakdown cover so did it myself along with my own repairs.

 

Now I can afford it, I can sit back, relax and leave it to a professional. :)

 

Besides which, being a Green Oval owner, wheel changing is probably the only reason I will be calling them out so may as well get my money's worth. :P

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Did I hear somewhere that it is compulsory to call for breakdown service in France if a wheel needs changing. Perhaps some of our ex-pat colleagues can clarify this.

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Did I hear somewhere that it is compulsory to call for breakdown service in France if a wheel needs changing. Perhaps some of our ex-pat colleagues can clarify this.

 

On French Autoroutes you can't just deal with stuff yourself nor can your own breakdown company.

 

http://www. autoroutes. fr/en/breakdown-service. htm

 

ed to add a better link.

Edited by Tin_Snail

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Something to consider is the sheer size and weight of the wheel. Last one I changed was I'm the spring on our Korando which has quite small wheels compared to those on many SUVs favoured by caravanists. I consider myself to be fit and able bodied but thought this is about as big as I would want to change.

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Something to consider is the sheer size and weight of the wheel. Last one I changed was I'm the spring on our Korando which has quite small wheels compared to those on many SUVs favoured by caravanists. I consider myself to be fit and able bodied but thought this is about as big as I would want to change.

I've reached a point of not being able to lift a SUV wheel/tyre in/out of the car and have come to an arrangement with my local indy workshop where they store my spare set of wheels/tyres and change them over twice/year.

 

To increase caravan payload, I've recently removed the spare and carrier and even lifting the caravan spare is getting troublesome.

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Do others feel changing a wheel is justification for calling out your breakdown service?

My philosophy regarding breakdown services is simple:-

If I can do it safely, then I will. If I am unable or it is unsafe, I will seek help.

 

I do have breakdown cover but generally would not call for assistance for a simple puncture, as I prefer to be on my way in a few minutes, rather than wait at the back of a queue. I am part of the overlooked class in today's society (ie - a healthy British male with no disabilities or young kids) so can guarantee that I will be bottom of the priority list when help is needed.

 

Gordon.

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I've called out for punctures. Usually when on the offside when on the motorway, or one time when the chocolate wheel brace snapped.

 

My wife's also called me out (or attempted to) a couple of times. Each time I have been away with work, but managed to get either the local garage or even better the breakdown cover that we pay for out to her. ...

 

Happy to change it myself if it's safe and I have the time. .. My work car of course does not give me that opportunity. ...

 

A tip for stuck wheels. Make sure the bolts are on hand tight, and drive a foot forward and back. Obviously do not continue any longer. Should unstick them.

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With ref. to my previous post, my breakdown cover was with RAC via a deal with my bank and now it appears its not what it says on the tin. ..so be careful out there . I shall be looking at my cover closer and am thinking about CC or similar deal.

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Something to consider is the sheer size and weight of the wheel. Last one I changed was I'm the spring on our Korando which has quite small wheels compared to those on many SUVs favoured by caravanists. I consider myself to be fit and able bodied but thought this is about as big as I would want to change.

 

Yes, I have changed wheels on my Discovery but it can be a bit of a struggle.

 

Going back to original question, I would always use breakdown services for any problem on a motorway / busy road but would tackle many things myself if appropriate and safe.

 

Many years ago I was an AA patrol and was regularly called out to start a chap with an elderly Jag and failing charging system. He was eventually warned. ....

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generally flat tyre I'd do myself. A consideration is location and safety and it may well be worth while calling for a breakdown van just to give you some protection from traffic. They can hit the breakdown truck instead of you. id be gutted if the driver then went on to change my wheel and got hit.

 

macafee2

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As a breakdown patrol myself I would say call us out for anything you can't do yourself. There is no shame on modern cars, they don't make it easy. That's what you pay us for :)

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We find that alloy wheels on cars that have been dealer serviced never come off easily, it's an ongoing joke in the trade. Sometimes it will take a 14lb hammer to move them, trying to get them off on the ground at the side of a motorway must be virtually impossible for a car owner. All the nonsense about not putting copaslip on the spigots is just well nonsense! In God knows how many years we have never had a problem as stated by others in the trade here. Listen to those who have the scars not those who have spent ten minutes googling to back up their theory.

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As a breakdown patrol myself I would say call us out for anything you can't do yourself. There is no shame on modern cars, they don't make it easy. That's what you pay us for :)

but what about what we can do ourselves? for most, changing a wheel is not a hard job.

 

macafee2

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As a breakdown patrol myself I would say call us out for anything you can't do yourself. There is no shame on modern cars, they don't make it easy. That's what you pay us for :)

I am a member of Green Flag, but I don't see this as being automatically 'on call' for assistance, simply because I've 'paid for it'.

I still carry out my routine checks and have my car serviced in accordance with the manufacturer's schedule. For example, when we and some friends were staying on the same site, he asked me why I was checking oil, water and tyre pressures. To my comment that it is routine, he said that he never lifts the bonnet - the car has its annual maintenance, and he has always got his breakdown service. To use this as a back up for not doing the routine checks is, to me, wrong.

 

I am fully equipped to do a wheel change, and would only call for help if the situation was hazardous to life - changing a wheel on a M-way hard shoulder for instance. A rescue vehicle behind it with its un-missable array of flashing beacons is an obvious asset.

My rescue service is there if I need it - but I do my level best not to need it.

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but what about what we can do ourselves? for most, changing a wheel is not a hard job.

 

macafee2

But what about what we can do ourselves SAFELY. I think that should be the deciding factor as breakdown mechanics are trained in the art of fend off and they also have the vehicle to do it whereas a solo outfit doesn't. I always consider stopping in a fend off position if I see somebody changing a tyre alone. It is only a few minutes lost and hopefully I have a lifetime of those spare,

regards,

Ian.

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I'm fit and capable of changing a spare wheel but would deffinitely think twice if it was the offside front or back on hard shoulder of the motorway. .

 

A bright Van with flashing lights is hard not to spot!.

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. .......A bright Van with flashing lights is hard not to spot!.

Very true - and yet there have been occasions when a driver has ploughed into such a vehicle on the hard shoulder with all its beacons flashing. A sobering thought if ever caught stranded on the hard shoulder. That's why the advice given is to vacate the vehicle from the near side and get as far back from the M-way as possible whilst waiting for assistance.

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I'm fit and capable of changing a spare wheel but would deffinitely think twice if it was the offside front or back on hard shoulder of the motorway. .

 

A bright Van with flashing lights is hard not to spot!.

It is when you are asleep, which the driver is in most of these hard shoulder accidents :(

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