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Gordon

Older Vehicles Banned From Paris

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Just a reminder that since Friday 1 July 2016 the following vehicles have been banned from central Paris between 8AM and 8PM week days.

 

Cars registered before 1 January 1997

Commercial vehicles registered before 1 October 1997

Motorbikes registered before 1 June 1999

 

This won't affect most but it does mean that I can no longer visit central Paris during the daytime in my 1995 registered MGF as the ban also applies to foreign vehicles.

 

The area covered is inside the peripherique ring road – except the Bois de Boulogne and Bois de Vincennes woods – from 08:00-20:00 Monday to Friday.

 

Outside these times and areas there are no restrictions except for vehicles over 3. 5t registered before 30 September 2001 - which have been banned permanently since 1 September 2015.

 

Fines will be applied from 1 October 2016, at €35 for a car or bike (rising to €450 for a second offence). From 1 July 2017 the fine increases to €68 for a car or bike and €135 for a commercial vehicle.

 

From 1 January 2017 the zone will be policed using windscreen ‘vignette’ stickers but until then, police may ask to see the registration document.

 

Nice to feel welcome.

Gordon.

Paris ban older vehicles.jpg

 

Information from https://driveeuropenews. com/author/driveeuropenews

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Having witnessed street parking in Paris where the car parking just pushed another car further along the road to get into a space, I for one would never want to drive into Paris whatever age my car! Many of the cars I did see parked had dents possibly from similar parking etiquete.

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So there will be no vintage or steam rallies in Paris then???

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Why any body would want to take any car into the centre of any major city is beyond me TBH.

 

That is why we have park and ride, trams and other public transport.

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What's the reason for the ban? is it suggesting older cars are more of a pollutant or a gentle nudge to buy a newer car?

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Like Reluctant above, I have driven in Paris once when on business driving senior Directors of a major supermarket chain here in the UK, I was driving a Renault Espace in the centre, the worst bit was negotiating the Place de Concorde, a nightmare, so I would never ever enter Paris by car again

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No problem to me I would never go to France in the first place, quite happy to stay in good old Blighty.

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What's the reason for the ban? is it suggesting older cars are more of a pollutant or a gentle nudge to buy a newer car?

 

Paris has some of the worst pollution of all the major European Cities. On a sunny summers day if you are in the correct position and look towards the city you can see the whole place shrouded in in a brownish haze so this is an attempt to deal with that I would say.

 

Its still a very nice city to visit though - just travel on their Metro!

No problem to me I would never go to France in the first place, quite happy to stay in good old Blighty.

 

Excellent!, that's one less in the queue for Dover! :)

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Haven't been to Paris for more than 25 years because the pollution was so bad we could hardly breath. Heaven knows what it is like now!

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Haven't been to Paris for more than 25 years because the pollution was so bad we could hardly breath. Heaven knows what it is like now!

 

Real time pollution levels.

 

http://aqicn. org/map/paris/

 

Five locations in central Paris all labelled 'Unhealthy for sensitive groups' as at 9. 00 (French time) this morning.

Edited by Tin_Snail

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What's the reasoning ?

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Strange. I have been to Paris a number of times, including haven driven there. Never really noticed the pollution before.

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Strange. I have been to Paris a number of times, including haven driven there. Never really noticed the pollution before.

 

Depends on the weather conditions.

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How were they going to monitor it ?

 

A old vehicle with private plates fitted .

 

Do we have cross border fines agreement with France ?

At the moment you can't get a ticket for speeding if caught on camera.

 

 

 

 

 

Dave

Edited by CommanderDave

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Strange. I have been to Paris a number of times, including haven driven there. Never really noticed the pollution before.

 

You likely wont if you are actually in amongst it, don't have a condition that compromises your respiratory function and the weather conditions are OK.

 

But most of the evidence, rather than anecdote would suggest there is a problem.

 

paris-air-pollution-m.jpg

Edited by Tin_Snail

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Slightly off topic.

I am pleased we addressed the situation in this country, when you see old pics of London IN THE 1950S-1960S, non the wonder there were health problems then.

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Central Paris is easy to get about by walking or using the metro. Last time we went we used the hop on-off tourist bus, 24 hour ticket was reasonable.

I would not want to drive there anyway!

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Slightly off topic. I am pleased we addressed the situation in this country, when you see old pics of London IN THE 1950S-1960S, non the wonder there were health problems then.

 

We still have high emissions in London and still get pictures of smog and will have why we have lorries and buses and taxis pumping out smoke . We cured the chimney smoke but now have a increasing problem from the diesel engines .

9500 die in London each year it is reported.

 

Dave

Edited by CommanderDave

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I know I've posted these images before but for those who have not seen them, the chaotic view is taken from the top of the Arc de Triomphe at L'Etoile looking down onto the circulating traffic below.

Parisien traffic - 1.jpg Parisien traffic - 2.jpg

Personally I've never had a problem driving solo in central Paris and have done so many times over the years. It looks like madness, but in it's own strange way it actually works providing drivers indicate their intention, a gap will appear for them to move into. Drivers do have to be assertive, while also being prepared to give way to other vehicles on a 'one for one' basis, so if following a friend don't ever expect to change lanes immediately behind their car for the gap will never be big enough for two vehicles!

As for the reason for banning older vehicles; I suspect it is the same rational as the low emissions zones we have here in the UK, and they are working on the assumption that older cars will pollute more. Where this logic falls down is that an older registered car may for example actually be running on LPG and therefore have a much lower emission level than some brand new cars running on petrol, thus while simple in principle a blanket ban also catches some that are not the main problem.

Gordon.

 

Admin Note:

This topic has been started in two other threads today, so responses in those have been moved into this thread to keep all discussion on this subject in one place. The duplicate threads have now been removed.

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The main problem with France is the continuity of 'Priorité à droite' on large islands in most cities - the Place de L'Etoile (Arc do Triomphe) being a classic example. There are lines of metal studs radiating from the centre that are effectively stop lines to let traffic join from the side roads. The problem is that said joining traffic usually does not wait for a space, it just charges out. On one occasion whilst driving round it I saw no less than three collisions caused by that practice - and I was only going five stops (of eight) to my exit!

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Central Paris is easy to get about by walking or using the metro. ..............

 

Yes - if you are able-bodied. But my wife is a wheelchair-user. Public transport is not really an option as we need the car close-by with a spare (charged) wheelchair battery ready to go.

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Paris, Lyons and Grenoble are three cities that require cars to display a sticker showing their Emission Levels. This is similar to the scheme operating in Germany.

 

Cost only a few Euros and, if like the German scheme, once bought will last the life of the car.

 

No point in going over the details here but basically if you are touring abroad later this year you would be advised to get a sticker - more cities will join the scheme and for what it costs it's simply not worth worrying about.

 

Here is a link explaining it. Applications for non French vehicles start Feb 1st:

 

http://www. rac. co. uk/drive/news/motoring-news/law-change-for-uk-drivers-in-french-cities/

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Erm, 25 towns and cities to be exact.

 

And as for 'a few Euros' - the cost to a French driver is €19. 35. It will be interesting to see what they charge the rest of Europe and in particular applicants from the UK. There seems to be variation in Germany - may places want to charge €12 + €6 P&P, so why do Berlin only charge €6 - and it arrives in three days! I wonder how France will respond?

 

From what I see you need to send a scan of your V5C, your driving licence (why?) and your passport, and you can only pay by credit card.

 

It becomes effective 1st April - and it is not an April Fool!

Edited by Woodentop

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Erm, 25 towns and cities to be exact.

 

And as for 'a few Euros' - the cost to a French driver is €19. 35. It will be interesting to see what they charge the rest of Europe and in particular applicants from the UK. There seems to be variation in Germany - may places want to charge €12 + €6 P&P, so why do Berlin only charge €6 - and it arrives in three days! I wonder how France will respond?

 

From what I see you need to send a scan of your V5C, your driving licence (why?) and your passport, and you can only pay by credit card.

 

It becomes effective 1st April - and it is not an April Fool!

 

Ce service vous permet en quelques clics de procéder à la demande de certificat qualité de l'air pour votre véhicule.
Vous devez vous munir de votre certificat d'immatriculation (anciennement carte grise) pour remplir les informations qui vont vous être demandées.
Le certificat qualité de l’air sera produit en se fondant uniquement sur les informations figurant dans le Système d’immatriculation des Véhicules, notamment la norme EURO pris en compte lors de la définition de la catégorie du certificat. .
Le prix est fixé à 3,70 € auxquels s’ajoute le montant de l’acheminement par voie postale. Pour un envoi en France, cela revient à 4,18 €.
Le certificat qualité de l'air sera expédié à l'adresse du propriétaire, ou du locataire longue durée le cas échéant, figurant sur le certificat d'immatriculation (anciennement carte grise).
Votre certificat d'immatriculation doit obligatoirement être à jour, en particulier votre adresse de domicile.
Si ce n'est pas le cas, veuillez procéder au changement d'adresse avant de poursuivre la démarche en cliquant ici. Cette procédure est rapide.
Which says that the fixed price is 3. 70 Euros plus postage costs which, in France, will be 4. 18Euros. I have described that as "a few Euros"
Last summer in Germany we paid a little more for a German certificate - Simply from a German Garage selling cars. (Such garages have a book of the slickers that are used for cars they sell. Takes a few minutes to sort)
As for scanning the V5C the French merely send in the details taken from their "Certificat d'immatriculation (anciennement carte grise)" You can see the form they use here: https://www. certificat-air. gouv. fr/demande/procedure
I have not seen the details for UK motorists nor how payment is made. As for being asked to provide a driving licence scan and a passport scan that too eludes me. I would imagine that the french Authorities could confirm such documents, if indeed required, from their serial numbers etc and will not require scans to be posted.
Where have you found all this information?

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Prices for foreign-registered vehicles have not been set, however, to give you an idea they currently cost French residents 4 Euros (around £3. 50).

UK motorists will be able to apply online for a sticker via the official Crit’Air website from 1 February 2017.

From 31 March 2017, all foreign registered vehicles must display an appropriate sticker or face a fine.

The RAC is aware of non-official, third party websites selling Crit’Air vignettes for substantially more than the rate set by the French government – motorists should ensure they only buy a sticker through the official Crit’Air website.

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