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Which Best Buy Bridge Cameras

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Does anyone have access to the Which? Best Buy Bridge Cameras article?

I cannot carry my Nikon kit around any longer, so I need a really good

Bridge camera.

I am using a Fuji X20 at the moment but am missing some really good

photo opportunities which need a longer focal length (around 300mm)

I was looking at the Lumix FZ330

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I do not have access to Which but you may find this website useful http://www. grahamhoughton. com/

 

He also has many videos on youtube. I found his articles very useful when I purchased an FZ200 which I have been very pleased with. For my camera he produced a manual to improve on the manufacturer's version which can still be downloaded in his download section. This may be useful as the cameras are fairly similar.

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I have access pm me with your email address and I'll send you the pdf copy of the page

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I had a serious look at bridge cameras when I got fed up with carrying various lenses around with me, and having the wrong lens on for a particular photo.

 

I looked at everything that was available and the biggest thing I couldn't get along with was the LCD screen in the viewfinder.

 

Even on the £1000 cameras the image was very artificial compared to my DSLR.

 

Eventually I gave up on a bridge camera, kept my trusty Canon DSLR and spend £300 on an 18 - 300 Sigma lens.

 

It covers the wide angle out to a decent telephoto and does a great job.

 

I did look at a similar Canon and a Tamron lens but the Sigma was way out in front in all the reviews.

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I had a serious look at bridge cameras when I got fed up with carrying various lenses around with me, and having the wrong lens on for a particular photo.

 

I looked at everything that was available and the biggest thing I couldn't get along with was the LCD screen in the viewfinder.

 

Even on the £1000 cameras the image was very artificial compared to my DSLR.

 

Eventually I gave up on a bridge camera, kept my trusty Canon DSLR and spend £300 on an 18 - 300 Sigma lens.

 

It covers the wide angle out to a decent telephoto and does a great job.

 

I did look at a similar Canon and a Tamron lens but the Sigma was way out in front in all the reviews.

 

Its certainly one way to do it but I found that Sigma lens (on a Nikon D40) was quite a heavy piece of kit.

 

I sold mine in the end and went to a Lumix bridge camera which I fell out of love with and I'm back using my D40 with a kit lens and a 55-200 mm telephoto.

 

I do often find though that sods law dictates that I have the wrong lens on for a particular photo opportunity :rolleyes: so I am thinking about going back to a bridge.

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Les sold his Canon DSLR 30d and associated lenses and purchased the Canon SX700HS with 30x optical zoom and he's very pleased with the results. Yes there are times he misses the heavy stuff, but he's more than satisfied with the replacement. He does use the manual functions from time to time, so not just using it on Auto. The camera has a 4. 5-135mm lens and with the zoom it picks up some pretty good stuff from a distance.

 

Edit - sorry, just realised the SC700HS wouldn't be classed as a bridge camera, but I'll leave the post on in case it helps anyone else.

Edited by Glen and Les

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Thank you all, as I said I use a Fuji X20, which is brilliant but

112mm longest focal length is no use for some of the wildlife

that I can no longer sneak up on :D

The Nikon D80 I have had for a long time, but not used much

as carrying even a few lenses kills my back. I have tried a waist

bag but I can only carry one lens when to cover a range you will

need at least two.

I remembered the Lumix as it has a 1" sensor and a Leica lens

that has a 2. 8 aperture over the whole zoom range and the max

that can be hand held is around 200mm to 400mm so it would

cover most of my requirements

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I was in the same position recently and wanted a decent camera to go to New York. In the end I plumped for a Panasonic TZ100 camera. One word, Brilliant. Has a decent zoom and importantly a 1" sensor as per SLR's. Results were breathtaking. I know these are uploaded via photobucket, but it will give you an idea as to what it can do:

 

 

FF46CF8A-88FE-4B61-9BF4-25A422FF5857_zps

 

9920EB9A-1C17-4A92-B30D-58C219C1614E_zps

 

660DCDD8-B711-4014-A270-82458C9A280C_zps

 

83B33D06-3737-4476-9B45-D4F2F6D75719_zps

 

4CF999AC-D297-4391-A108-F095AB8A427B_zps

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Mine is only "officially" a compact (Lumix TZ70) but it takes some cracking photos and you can fiddle around with almost all the settings you need unlike most compacts. While the 30X optical (up to 60x with digital) isn't "proper" enthusiasts stuff, it's handy having such a good zoom in a camera that'll just about fit in your pocket.

 

Around £300.

 

The TZ100 above is definitely more of a "proper" camera but has far less zoom.

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Hi all, I'm what you might call a "still learning" in the Photography stakes but have owned several Bridge type cameras over recent years from Nikon, Sony, Panasonic, Olympus brands. My wife thinks I have a new camera every 5 minutes!

I do enjoy taking landscapes, flowers, wildlife etc. Mostly enjoy using a camera when we visit NT properties and the like. Wife does the insides and I do the outsides.

Anyway, the point of my post is that for a pocketable camera with great results I would recommend a Sony HX50, which takes great photo's and is a decent size, although this has been superseded by the following camera Olympus Stylus 1s.

I chose the Oly for its ability to zoom to 600mm at the press of a button, it's f2. 8 constant lens, and the brilliant viewfinder. I struggled when taking shots in bright sunlight with the HX50 and this fitted the bill.

 

These are now getting quite rare in the UK, but can be found with a bit of searching.

 

Hope it's of some use.

Edited by Barum

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FWIW I bought a FZ1000 since I too tired of carrying a 7D and lenses. It gives good results, 25-400mm zoom, F2. 8 max aperture although only at widest angle, takes good video, 4K if you want and has a good selection of control. However I remain slightly disappointed with the clarity and sharpness, only slightly though. There's a review here if you're interested.

 

SWMBO has recently bought a slightly older Canon G16 compact, not a bridge, but gives very good results and has a good range of adjustment. Much easier to hold and use than most smaller compacts we've tried.

Funnily enough I've finally changed my old steam driven phone for a modern smartphone, an S7, and that takes excellent photos in a snap type environment in decent light. So much so that I use it more often than either of the above simply because it's always there. Of course there's always a time when using it I wish I had the FZ1000 or 7D with me, but you can't beat it for convenience.

Camera preferences are such a personal thing it's hard to make general recommendations, but we're happy with the choices the above range give us.

TS

Edited by TinShack

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I have a Canon DSLR camera with a lovely 15-85 zoom lens. Trouble is I find it increasingly heavy to carry around with my knee problems. I went down the route of a Canon Powershot G16 which I can put in my pocket and it produces pretty good pictures. I now use it for most of the recent photos in my Blogs.

 

David

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FWIW I bought a FZ1000 since I too tired of carrying a 7D and lenses. It gives good results, 25-400mm zoom, F2. 8 max aperture although only at widest angle, takes good video, 4K if you want and has a good selection of control. However I remain slightly disappointed with the clarity and sharpness, only slightly though. There's a review here if you're interested.

 

SWMBO has recently bought a slightly older Canon G16 compact, not a bridge, but gives very good results and has a good range of adjustment. Much easier to hold and use than most smaller compacts we've tried.

 

Funnily enough I've finally changed my old steam driven phone for a modern smartphone, an S7, and that takes excellent photos in a snap type environment in decent light. So much so that I use it more often than either of the above simply because it's always there. Of course there's always a time when using it I wish I had the FZ1000 or 7D with me, but you can't beat it for convenience.

 

Camera preferences are such a personal thing it's hard to make general recommendations, but we're happy with the choices the above range give us.

 

TS

I would also give a strong (but not 100%) endorsement for the Lumix FZ1000. I have been a photographer for 30+ years and eventually found my Nikon DSLR and all the lenses and accessories far too cumbersome. After research over several months I decided on a mirrorless interchangeable lens camera, the Fujifilm X-T1. It's considerably lighter than my Nikon D300 and gives noticeably better results, especially in low light and other difficult focussing conditions. It's autofocus system is beyond anything I have seen before in a non-professional camera - simply superb.

However, back to the FZ1000. My partner bought one recently, again after months of research. It has an amazing feature set and takes excellent images. It's light, about the size of a DSLR but half the weight. Long zoom and no swapping lenses. What's not to like? Well, about the only two things I don't admire are the menu system and the lack of a really good macro facility. The fact that so much is menu driven rather than dedicated buttons/dials makes selections slower which sometimes means you miss the best shot. The menu is also not very intuitive (at least to me it isn't). There is a macro feature but focussing is harder than it should be and images cannot compare to a dedicated macro lens on a good DSLR. If macro photography is not needed, this is of course not an issue.

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I have a Panasonic TZ60, not a bridge camera but a very capable compact, it was leader of the pack when I bought it 18 months ago, as with all technology it is out of date within months of purchase. It has a very competent 30X zoom and automatic features to make the best of most situations, it also has manual control for anyone who believes they can better the onboard programming.

 

I have the TZ60 as a pocketable alternative to a full size DSLR (D40 with additional lenses) to be honest the pocketability of the TZ60 wins out all the time over the DSLR . .. Great pictures are far more about content than the n'th degree of technical accuracy. ..

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I have a Panasonic TZ60, not a bridge camera but a very capable compact, it was leader of the pack when I bought it 18 months ago, as with all technology it is out of date within months of purchase. It has a very competent 30X zoom and automatic features to make the best of most situations, it also has manual control for anyone who believes they can better the onboard programming.

 

I have the TZ60 as a pocketable alternative to a full size DSLR (D40 with additional lenses) to be honest the pocketability of the TZ60 wins out all the time over the DSLR . .. Great pictures are far more about content than the n'th degree of technical accuracy. ..

I got the TZ70 the day it was released. I swear it was less than a year ago (could be longer. ..) but already I see that TZ80 has been out for some time; hard to keep up!

 

They are all incredibly versatile and the way they handle poor lighting conditions is amazing; I've taken decent night shots, photos almost directly into sunlight, sunset pics, action photos, etc and rarely get a bad shot.

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However, back to the FZ1000. ... Well, about the only two things I don't admire are the menu system and the lack of a really good macro facility. The fact that so much is menu driven rather than dedicated buttons/dials makes selections slower which sometimes means you miss the best shot. The menu is also not very intuitive (at least to me it isn't).

I'd agree about the menus. If you have time to set up before the shot I suppose it's OK, but when wanting to change the focussing point or what the focussing ring adjusts, zoom or focus and many others, it just takes too long and I'm never sure where in the menu pages the setting lives. I find it best to have a few entire custom menu sets that I can more easily switch between.

 

The BIL has a Canon SX410 bridge and it's more compact than the FZ1000. He seems very happy with it and gets some good results. All in auto.

 

TS

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I got the TZ70 the day it was released. I swear it was less than a year ago (could be longer. ..) but already I see that TZ80 has been out for some time; hard to keep up!

 

They are all incredibly versatile and the way they handle poor lighting conditions is amazing; I've taken decent night shots, photos almost directly into sunlight, sunset pics, action photos, etc and rarely get a bad shot.

The only issue I had with my tz60 and possible 80, was that my club like hands got in the way of the flash, so most people went either red, orange or in the dark! My old tz3 was great, but I killed that. So hence why I went to the tz100, and the rest is history. In the whole of our 4 days in NYC, I took over 800 pictures and a fair few at night where I didn't even need to use the flash the whole time we were there as the light sensor and shutter speed were fantastic

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The only issue I had with my tz60 and possible 80, was that my club like hands got in the way of the flash, so most people went either red, orange or in the dark! My old tz3 was great, but I killed that. So hence why I went to the tz100, and the rest is history. In the whole of our 4 days in NYC, I took over 800 pictures and a fair few at night where I didn't even need to use the flash the whole time we were there as the light sensor and shutter speed were fantastic

I slightly wish I hadn't seen the TZ100 - it does look very good as do your photos. .. Uh oh. ..

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I'm another one with the Lumix FZ 1000. I have previously owned Canon bridge cameras - my most recent being the SX 30 which I was very pleased with. Although the zoom lens, on the Canon, is excellent, I found the camera very slow especially in low light conditions. The more recent Canon bridge cameras, from the reviews I've read, don't seem to have corrected this so having read every review possible I chose the FZ 1000. I have been very, very pleased with the results. The one inch sensor makes such a difference to the quality of the photograph and although the zoom is not as powerful the detail in the photo means you can crop to almost the equivalent of the Canon zoom without loss of quality. I agree the menu takes time to wade through and the camera is slightly bigger and heavier than most bridge cameras but these to me are minor points. Definitely a camera to consider.

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