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Information about SoLiD construction used by Elddis

 

 



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They certainly talk a good game!

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"Crashing through potholes" during testing hmm. .................................

 

Ian

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The bonding adhesive is still applied by humans - if it were done by robots, i would be more confident

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The factory tour the year that SoLiD was introduced was certainly an eye-opener and indeed based upon the technology and my own personal knowledge of the principals of bonding components/parts together - it is theoretically bullet proof,but so then was Alu-Tech.

The bonding technique needs to be sharper and a more rigid inspections carried out by one individual team member - he/she would then be ultimately accountable for returns/rejects that get reported under warranty work by the dealerships.

 

It is just a pity that the otherwise advances/advantages in bonding have been overshadowed by other issues.

 

I still maintain that Elddis/The Explorer Group have created some of the most usable and versatile layouts in the caravan industry.

I am still quite favourable of their mid 2010 twin axle Avante,SuperSirocco and Buccaneer Caravel ranges.

Edited by AWanderingLancastrian

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An interesting sales pitch which will no doubt steal a march on their competitors whose body warranties do not appear to be as generous. Not much of gamble on the manufacturer's part as the indications are that very few caravans remain with the original buyers for ten years.

 

Low budget videos showing 21st century technology being applied by hand as it would have been during the 18th century industrial revolution do not inspire me with much confidence.

 

Elddis may have reduced the number of screws but it seems to be at the expense of using far too much bonding material.

 

I would like to see a video of how damaged body panels are repaired?

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Am I missing something?

 

Has something changed or are these just the original videos that were released back in 2012?

 

Davros

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Has something changed or are these just the original videos that were released back in 2012?

You are correct. They are not new videos. All we have done is to take links from all over the forum, and put them in one place.

Admin

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An interesting sales pitch which will no doubt steal a march on their competitors whose body warranties do not appear to be as generous. Not much of gamble on the manufacturer's part as the indications are that very few caravans remain with the original buyers for ten years.

 

Low budget videos showing 21st century technology being applied by hand as it would have been during the 18th century industrial revolution do not inspire me with much confidence.

 

Elddis may have reduced the number of screws but it seems to be at the expense of using far too much bonding material.

 

I would like to see a video of how damaged body panels are repaired?

 

They are probably repaired by bonding all of the recoverable bits/splintered material and carefully tailored infill pieces with 'Loads of bonding agent'.

I asked at the factory visit in 2012 whether there was a solvent agent for removing dried adhesive - I don't recall an answer.

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You are correct. They are not new videos. All we have done is to take links from all over the forum, and put them in one place.

Admin

 

Alan Bateman used to head their design team - a thoroughly nice chap - he is no-longer with them and has not been with them for some time as is the case allegedly with David Whitehouse - their Homologation Manager.

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I hope for the owners that it proves as good as the adverts. It will not get my money. I stand to be corrected but going on what I was told by a man with 'Solid' on his badge at the N. E. C. and claimed to be an engineer when I asked a few pointed questions. This was two years ago.

 

1. How about the windows ? They appeared to be the same mastic filled rubber profile as every manufacturer uses. He confirmed they were. I have spent many a happy hour repairing rotting vans when the window rubbers leaked. Ditto every other door - water inlet etc.

 

2. Why are you still using ABS for panels it cracks. No it doesn't sir. Oh yea read this forum.

 

3. Your banner proclaims a 10 year warranty. Yet this brochure says 12 months on plastic components and that includes the front and rear panels. Never was answered he found someone else to talk to.

 

On their own site

 

' But what happens if the wood gets wet?

It won't – SoLiD Construction prevents water ingress. Our philosophy is simple: Water can not get past a SoLiD Construction joint. '

It's soft wood with no special treatments as far as I can see. It can and will rot. Even if it can not get passed the glue line water getting into the walls will rot the wood of the joint or framing. Better than the old screw and nail very much so. As good as they claim, as this forum and other show unfortunately not.

Only the Swift HT is 'rot proof' because it's made of materials that do not rot. I fear Explorer Group have backed the steam engine for their cars, so to speak.

Edited by Alan Stanley
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Alan Bateman used to head their design team - a thoroughly nice chap - he is no-longer with them and has not been with them for some time as is the case allegedly with David Whitehouse - their Homologation Manager.

 

David Whitehead has also left, he was also a Homologation manager ;)

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Only the Swift HT is 'rot proof' because it's made of materials that do not rot. I fear Explorer Group have backed the steam engine for their cars, so to speak.

 

I don't think the Swift is totally (rot) water proof as the water could still penetrate the walls like any other caravan. The difference is of course that the material will not rot and the water will probably be more difficult to remove.

If the water is left, you will probably have condensation issues which in turn could lead to mould and as we all know mould spores are dangerous to your health as they attack your respiratory system.

BTW Explorer use GRP panels on some of their caravans whereas I believe Swift and others still use ABS front and rear panels. If an ABS panel on any caravan does crack you still have the warranty against water ingress plus you have the Consumer Rights Act for 6 years.

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I think you will find the new ht from Swift is all GRP.

 

Phil.

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We are all aware of the C. P. A. and other consumer protection legislation as has been discussed at length. But that is of no use if the dealership has gone bust or most private purchases. I never said the Swift HT was water proof that's why I used the word Rot. Water penetration to any extent will cause problems even for that structure in condensation / mold / long term damage to any structure. It will not rot in well under 12 months as will soft woods of the type used in the caravan industry. I'm sure that Swift this year have advertised that all there vans now use GRP Not ABS. I'll try and find it. Bailey don't use it all since the Alu-Tech introduction. Getting rid of it being one of the drives behind the design. There trim and bumper panels are made of Barex not ABS.

 

Yes Explorer still use ABS that's the whole point. Other better plastics are available and have been for years.

 

You may well have cover under the body rot but that does not cover things like cracked shower trays, A frame covers etc and there are enough disgruntled people on here with knocked back warranty claims for such things on vans over a year old and disinterested dealers. Not a fight I need to be involved in even if I win.

 

I have seen and repaired cracks in ABS where it did not actually result in any measurable water ingress over about 12 months but selling the van would have been a nightmare, as was owning it and worrying about it. (turned out the crack was directly over a ply reinforcing pad. Eventually that would have let the water through to the rear structure. ) It was rotting away nicely.

 

When or if they change there warranty to something that shows confidence in there product I will look at it again. Will be interesting to see at the NEC what this years documentation says as the SWIFT may be ready for replacement. No decision yet on that from the kids.

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I don't think the Swift is totally (rot) water proof as the water could still penetrate the walls like any other caravan. The difference is of course that the material will not rot and the water will probably be more difficult to remove.

If the water is left, you will probably have condensation issues which in turn could lead to mould and as we all know mould spores are dangerous to your health as they attack your respiratory system.

BTW Explorer use GRP panels on some of their caravans whereas I believe Swift and others still use ABS front and rear panels. If an ABS panel on any caravan does crack you still have the warranty against water ingress plus you have the Consumer Rights Act for 6 years.

You seem to be confusing water ingress and rot. Water ingress, of itself is trivial, and always happens. It comes in in many forms, even in our breath and wet clothes. Even a major leak is a minor problem, the entry point can be fixed, any significant puddles can be dried out and good ventilation with a little warmth dries out the rest. There may be some mould damage if the drying out is delayed, but nothing that cannot be easily fixed.

 

The real problems are that absorbent materials soak up and hold the water, what we refer to as "damp" and organic materials rot. If that is in part of the structure of the van it is a major problem. Bailey and the Swift group have taken big steps cutting down on the amount of absorbent and rot prone wood, with varying amounts of success.

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You seem to be confusing water ingress and rot. Water ingress, of itself is trivial, and always happens. It comes in in many forms, even in our breath and wet clothes. Even a major leak is a minor problem, the entry point can be fixed, any significant puddles can be dried out and good ventilation with a little warmth dries out the rest. There may be some mould damage if the drying out is delayed, but nothing that cannot be easily fixed.

 

The real problems are that absorbent materials soak up and hold the water, what we refer to as "damp" and organic materials rot. If that is in part of the structure of the van it is a major problem. Bailey and the Swift group have taken big steps cutting down on the amount of absorbent and rot prone wood, with varying amounts of success.

Water ingress on our current caravan was not trivial and I guess this is the case with many caavans that have damp issues. I am aware of the difference between water ingress and rot as it depends on how long the caravan has been damp in that area for rot to set in.

As pointed out in another thread, if you have water ingress in the winter and you then have a freeze, significant damage can be cause to any method of building a caravan as the water content freezes and expands and then creates an even bigger problem.

 

BTW from Explorer website reagridng buccaneer;

 

  • Larger 2-part GRP entrance door, with window blind, flyscreen and 12. 5L waste bin
  • Curved GRP rear panel with streamlined integrated rear light cluster and LED high level brake light
Edited by DeltaTIowner

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Pity SoLiD does not cure water ingress

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Pity SoLiD does not cure water ingress

I don't think there is any caravan build method that prevents water ingress?

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I don't think there is any caravan build method that prevents water ingress?

Agreed, but they all claim that they do allegedly

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Water ingress on our current caravan was not trivial and I guess this is the case with many caavans that have damp issues. I am aware of the difference between water ingress and rot as it depends on how long the caravan has been damp in that area for rot to set in.

As pointed out in another thread, if you have water ingress in the winter and you then have a freeze, significant damage can be cause to any method of building a caravan as the water content freezes and expands and then creates an even bigger problem.

 

BTW from Explorer website reagridng buccaneer;

  • Larger 2-part GRP entrance door, with window blind, flyscreen and 12. 5L waste bin
  • Curved GRP rear panel with streamlined integrated rear light cluster and LED high level brake light

What I am trying to say, (obviously not successfully), is that the real problem is not the water ingress. It is the fact that in most caravans, when water gets in, it is quickly soaked up into the wood, or wood based components from where it cannot readily dry out and then causes rot which is structurally damaging and difficult/expensive to repair.

 

It does not matter whether the water is from rainwater leaking in, plumbing leaks, careless use of the shower, condensation in cupboards or rooflights left open, the chances are that at some time there will be some water around where it should not be! The problem is that most caravans simply cannot cope with it!

Worst of all, if the water gets into structural timbers they normally swell up and break the seals that are meant to be keeping water out.

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I don't think there is any caravan build method that prevents water ingress?

However it is very much better if the design including choice of materials can cope with it; wood certainly can't on a prolonged basis so that at a stroke rules out most present offerings.

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' But what happens if the wood gets wet?


It won't – SoLiD Construction prevents water ingress. Our philosophy is simple: Water can not get past a SoLiD Construction joint. '



LOL I wish that were true ! 2014 Elddis Crusader Shamal leaking water in front left hand side of roof area plus various other faults, Elddis plus dealer don't want to know


Total Elddis rubbish caravan !


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