Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
a18041967

Ferry Crossing Savings - Any New Ideas?

Recommended Posts

Looks like we may have changed direction from OP question again. .....how odd!

 

geoff

That's fine, Geoff. Just kill the conversation. Good night !

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That's fine, Geoff. Just kill the conversation. Good night !

 

 

Don't think so. ..just look at the endless Respect thread on Landies!

 

geoff

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It would be interesting to know how the spend works both in store and by credit card to get a free tunnel trip, and if it is actually that free.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Alfa,

 

I get the Tunnel out and the boat back due to timescales and I actually prefer the ferry, on the way down I will drive from Birmingham to Folkestone, get the train then stop over in France, the shorter crossing time suits on the way down . On the way back we stay in Dunkirk catch the 12:00 Midday Ferry and have a sandwich & coffee on the boat then travel back to Birmingham. Also it saves a few pounds as the ferry back is only £80.

 

We do this 2-3 times a year.

Edited by harvomark
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You can collect Tesco club card points on a Tesco Credit card, but if you don't use it on Tesco products and outlets it is at a very reduced rate 1 point for every £8 spent with a minimum spend of £8 and quite a lot of things excluded and Tesco reserve the right to change the Terms?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

And the poor fuel too??

 

 

Phil.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I too would like to know how the sums work out using Tesco points. People often say they collect enough Tesco points to give them 'free' crossings, but it would be really good to know just how much you need to spend per week to qualify.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

And the poor fuel too??

Phil.

All fuel is the same at the refinery, it's just the additives that different companies add or don't plenty of information on the net. Some evidence cited loss of up to 2 mpg using Tesco fuel, total that up over a year and where is your saving on the Chunnel ?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Evidence please?

 

Phil.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Phil. ..you have not read the dozens of threads over the years on quality of fuels. ..last one was only a few weeks ago. ......ignoring premium fuels,quality and price, most supermarket fuels are supplied by Greenergy in UK, Tesco are big shareholders. ..they are buying other fuel companies storage and production units,one of which I worked on in Humberside,another on Teesside. ...we had anything up to ten vehicles on site at any time all with different names on. ..if the spec was different for,say a Total garage,then the lorry would go for additives to match blend needed. ..

 

Geoff

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I was asking for the evidence that Tesco fuel provides fewer mpg than other fuels and i still have not seen it.

 

Phil.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The other thing that is annoying about collecting Tesco Clubcard points is that you only get half the rate on fuel ?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I was asking for the evidence that Tesco fuel provides fewer mpg than other fuels and i still have not seen it.

 

Phil.

Sorry Phil!

 

Geoff

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Tesco Clubcard gives you a best rate of 1 point = £1 spent in store, therefore 100 points will get you £1 worth of vouchers, so every £100 spent will get you £1 in vouchers is that right? Also cheap fuel isn't doing you any favours if you are collecting points on fuel as every £200 spent will get you £1 in vouchers wow! Save yourself the bother shop at Aldi and you can save the same amount in month?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Still waiting for you to substantiate your claims re Tesco petrol and less mpg?? I take it you cannot having asked so many times with no response?

 

As for your other points you are half right of course if you pay for you groceries and your fuel with the Tesco credit card in store you get much more points. Then of course their is Tesco mobile EON energy i could go on . You keep going on about Aldi visited once did not have the choice i prefer so non starter for me but i guess thats why they are cheap?

 

 

Phil.

Edited by phil1041

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sorry Phil!

 

Geoff

No need Geoff.

I just wish when people make statements like that in a public forum they have the evidence to substantiate these allegations thats all!!

 

Phil.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

No need Geoff.

I just wish when people make statements like that in a public forum they have the evidence to substantiate these allegations thats all!!

Phil.

Phil, you are right in as much as it is a forum not a court of law, so f you disagree with what I have said do a bit of research on the Internet to satisfy yourself that using Tesco fuel is ok.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

No need Geoff.

I just wish when people make statements like that in a public forum they have the evidence to substantiate these allegations thats all!!

 

Phil.

My diesel definitely smokes more when using supermarket fuel and the petrol vehicle runs smoother when not using supermarket fuel and probably does more mpg however that is debateable. Just a gut feeling why I will not use supermarket fuel as the additive they use may be different to the one that is used in for instance a BP servcie station. I have no proof of mpg figures, but it is my choice to pay . 02p extra for what may be a better quality fuel.

We have no interest in shopping at Tesco as find the quality of food better at Morrisons so we will never accumulate enough points to "save" money on a ferry crossing, but it does not worry us.

 

The following written by an expert in the field is repeated especially for Phil in case he missed it the first time around and hopefully will help him sleep easier at night; :D

 

This topic reappears every so often, but in essence I'll quote my answer about diesel fuel - and petrol is pretty much the same story:

 

As the UK Representative to CEN WG9 (European standards committee for all motor vehicle fuels) all pump fuel in Europe is produced to meet the relevant EN standard - which you will see written on the pump body.

The major difference between the supermarket fuels and the branded fuels is the exact nature of the additive pack added to the fuel when it leaves the refinery - common rail pump lubricants, injector cleaners, etc.

Synthesised Diesel

The exception to this is the new "synthesised" diesel fuels, such as BP Ultimate (actually researched by Aral in Germany), Shell V-Power (may be called something else in the UK), and Total Excellium. These fuels are manufactured in the refinery by joining simple petroleum hydrocarbons into an exact diesel fuel - you'll need some experience of university level Chemistry to follow what they do - so just accept that they are better - higher cetane rating, better additive pack, etc.

Normal Diesel

This is a straight distillation fraction from crude oil, produced by the nearest refinery to the fuel depot - so for instance, diesel refined by Shell may be sold by any of the other retailers close to that Shell refinery. The major difference is the additive pack - which is brand specific - and any specification difference imposed on the refinery by the other retailers - and the addition of bio-diesel.

Bio-diesel

Another one of our EN committees, pump bio-diesel is a blend of normal refinery diesel (95%) and (5%) of pure bio-diesel. This is an EN standard and all EU countries will be (or are) selling this bio-diesel as a direct replacement for normal diesel. All the car manufacturers have accepted this 95:5 blended fuel, and we are working on specifications for a 90:10 blend.

Pure bio-diesel is manufactured by mixing and heating vegetable oil with methanol (methyl alcohol) and sodium hydroxide (caustic soda). This splits the vegetable oil into glycerine and fatty acids, which immediately reacts with the methanol to form a "fatty acid methyl ester" or FAME (bio-diesel).

FAME is perfectly fine as a diesel fuel, it has very good lubricating effects - and replaces the lubricant additive in a normal diesel fuel - except that it is not as stable as normal diesel - it tends to go "sour" or "rancid", which is why the car manufacturers don't like you to run a car on pure bio-diesel. Not a problem as a 95:5 blend.

Vegetable Oil

Reasonably OK for an old (pre 1995) diesel engined car - except that the car won't start on cold vegetable oil, but once the engine is running it's OK.

Other problems are that vegetable oil quickly turns in a gummy glop (like the linseed oil that artists use) and the car's fuel system and that the engine needs a lot more maintenance - blocked injectors, gummy residue in pumps and cylinders, etc.

After market additives

After market products like Millers improve the cetane rating of standard diesel, but only when the engine is cold - interestingly it doesn't help a hot engine - so cold starting is usually quieter but no difference to a hot engine - and Millers does provide good, additional pump lubricity.

 

Self Tuning Engine Computer

So, if your diesel engined car "self tunes" then try Shell V-Power, BP Ultimate, Total Excellium - I see between 3% and 5% improvement in fuel consumption. My Mercedes C270 returned 52. 8 mpg driving from Rotterdam to Wendover yesterday - on Dutch Shell V-Power - 320 miles at speeds of around 60, 70 and 80 mph depending on the country / road speed limit - using the electronic speed limiter. If not, stick with the regular diesel fuel, and add Redex or Millers at the recommended dosage level - adding more won't improve the performance. And don't be dismissive of supermarket fuel, it can and often is identical to branded fuel.

And if you add Redex or Millers or switch to a branded fuel, then any change to the cleanliness of the injectors won't show itself for quite a few hundred miles, but pump lubrication and maybe a higher cetane rating will show an effect much sooner - depends how much old fuel was in the tank and fuel lines - and how much the old fuel dilutes the action of the new fuel.

So is there a difference between supermarket and branded fuel ? - there can be - but often there isn't.

How can you tell if one fuel is better than another?

To compare the fuel consumption, you need to exactly reproduce two journeys - exactly the same speed, exactly the same acceleration and braking, and under identical conditions:

Atmospheric Pressure

A one percent change in air pressure has an identical effect on power and torque - so driving on days with high pressure makes the engine generate more power

Temperature

Driving on hotter days reduces engine power.

Humidity and Rain

Driving on days when it is humid or raining significantly improves engine power - water injection is used in truck racing and sucking in damp air has a similar effect in increasing power.

These produce percentage level effects on mpg - making it difficult for the driver to make comparisons. Driving on a cold, damp day may see an improvement of 3% or more compared to a hot, dry day.

Even more important are the effects of different traffic levels and the inability of drivers to EXACTLY reproduce a journey on UK roads, for instance:

Speed

A 1 mph increase in speed (say 60 instead of 59) will make about a 2% difference in fuel consumption - rolling friction and wind resistance increase exponentially - on top of the extra fuel need to spin the engine that bit faster.

Unless you drive everywhere using an electronic speed limiter or digital cruise control then it's impossible for most drivers to reproduce even a constant speed.

Acceleration and Braking

Big percentage differences here - and unless you are driving on an empty test track - the effects of other traffic, let alone how you drive the car, have effects at least as large as the difference attributed to different fuels.

Summary

There is a reproducible improvement of between 3% and 5% by buying the synthesised diesel fuels - BP Ultimate, Shell V-Power, Total Excellium, etc - compared to the standard branded diesel fuels.

There are smaller differences between supermarket and standard branded fuels - sometimes they are physically the same fuel - sometimes they differ only by the additive (cleaner) pack - and sometimes they are different.

Day to day variations in the weather, driver reproducibility and traffic make it very difficult for drivers to reproduce journeys.

Comparing two fuels

If you do want to make a comparison, drive your car until the fuel tank is almost empty, then fill the tank and after you have driven 200 miles (any old fuel should have been used up), drive at a fixed speed on a motorway for 10 miles and record the fuel consumption.

Then the next time you fill up, repeat the exercise with a different brand of fuel - but remember to test on exactly the same section of motorway and on a similar day.

Checking your fuel consumption over normal driving, in stop start traffic, over a period of weeks - just tells you that you have had to driven differently.

And don't forget the placebo effect.

Robert aka Robjax a former member on CT

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Phil, you are right in as much as it is a forum not a court of law, so f you disagree with what I have said do a bit of research on the Internet to satisfy yourself that using Tesco fuel is ok.

In other words you cannot back up your allegations visa vi Tesco fuel why not just say so???

 

Oh and speaking of courts of law you might want to do some research on the subject of libel.

 

Phil.

Edited by phil1041

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have occasionally filled up with the "premium" diesel by mistake and maybe it needs more than one tankful but I could see no difference whatsoever and we very carefully log every litre brim to brim. Providing the basic stuff is safe for the engine and according to the manufactures it only has to meet the EU standard I cant see it ever paying for itself in terms of improved MPG. As for the Tesco issue we dont use the tunnel but if we did I would have no hesitation in at least changing credit card, we dont shop there but neither could we manage with Aldi or Lidl for anything other than odd items as they just dont provide the range of products.

Getting back to the original question we use the Portsmouth Caen crossing booked through the Caravan Club and when choosing the right sailing times (caravan goes free) combined with 7 camping cheques it is very much cheaper than the tunnel and cuts about 500 miles off our return journey

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For me the fuel is paid for by the company have to use a fuel card, the credit card is free to use, I shop at Asda as I prefer their products but I still get enough points to get free crossings if it wasn't for the fuel I would get a cashback credit card and earn money for the crossings that way. For me the fuel quality only makes a significant difference on high performance cars.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So if you spend £100 in a Tesco store you get 100 points which will get you £1 in vouchers ! But you are spending £30 a week more than if you shopped at Aldi to buy exactly the same food made by the same company?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So if you spend £100 in a Tesco store you get 100 points which will get you £1 in vouchers ! But you are spending £30 a week more than if you shopped at Aldi to buy exactly the same food made by the same company?

 

I'd agree that I've shaved roughly a third off our bill by shopping using Aldi, more importantly for me I can be there and back within an hour, the large store round trip was a right faff.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'd agree that I've shaved roughly a third off our bill by shopping using Aldi, more importantly for me I can be there and back within an hour, the large store round trip was a right faff.

Yep you would save yourself £300 every 10 weeks, that is a much better scheme than Tesco and you keep the money in your pocket. If you spend £100 per week you 100 points which equals £1 so to get £100 in vouchers you need to spend £100 for 100 weeks even with the boost to,get the equivalent amount in vouchers? Just checked my account and I use it for fuel and incidentals at the local Tesco Express all the time ant have got 663 points which equals £6. 50

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There's no way we'd save that much at Aldi.

 

We do shop there as it's close and our local one happens to have good fruit and veg (a lot don't). It's also got a decent car park and enough tills (a lot don't).

 

I suspect that those who "save" the most were previously buying brands at tesco, Asda etc.

 

We typically visit a big supermarket once a month. Spending a Max of £100. Aldi gets about £30 a month and local co-op and others about the same.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...