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ajbyorkshireman

Beware Elddis 10 Yr Damp Warranty Is Worthless

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Alan has given some very good advice. Our current caravan was on HP and we used the HP company to motivate the dealer when we had a damp issue plus other issues. Amazing the time scale was more than halved and most of the issues repaired to our satisfaction plus we got paid compensation even though we had not requested it. A bank loan may be cheaper, but offers no protection if things go wrong.

 

Cheers Delta, that's the way I'm going to do it, I feel a little more content now, a specially with poor reviews on Elddis vans, but I do like the look of the one we have chosen, but hopefully their want be any issues with it, fingers crossed

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Wonder how the OP is getting on?

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Hi Deltaowner,

No amount of arguing with the dealers would have got a new panel Elddis said no the caps are a recognised repair alternative that the industry accepts.

 

Hi Nogger,

All I can advise to help if you are worried is do not let them rush you during the hand over, check every exterior panel carefully, open all lockers check where screws are fitted for hinges, buy a damp meter they are quite cheap on amazon and check in every part of the caravan from floor to ceiling and from front to back anything above 15% is suspect 10 to 12 is standard

Check all the interior panels especially where the cupboards attach to the end panels especially the roof height cupboards for screws pushing through the end panels.

Light fittings often have missing screws, also there is a light above the microwave at ceiling height check it work with a switch mine had to be disconnected as it was on all the time.

Check the glass splash panel for the hob where it screws to the side panel for missing rubber grommets and chips along the edges.

Depending on the model check the bed base is level on our 540 the bed sloped down from the hinged side by 1cm enough to make you roll onto the wife.

Check the brush seal for the shower door both of ours were bowed on fitting.

Check all the worktop surfaces for damage especially the fold out table on the front draws when I unfolded ours it still had manufacturing debris under it which put dint into the table top, also check for dull areas as they may have tried to cover the damage with wax filler which when dry is dull.

Check the strips that cover panel joints inside the van.

By now you will realise that you need to check every part of the van fully.

Write down everything you find and before I get slated for saying this any fault is a reason to reject it no matter how small.

If everything is ok, go away in the van for at least a week for a good shake down.

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I forgot to say ask for ladders to check the roof as some vans have had damage on delivery

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Hi Deltaowner,

No amount of arguing with the dealers would have got a new panel Elddis said no the caps are a recognised repair alternative that the industry accepts.

 

Hi Nogger,

All I can advise to help if you are worried is do not let them rush you during the hand over, check every exterior panel carefully, open all lockers check where screws are fitted for hinges, buy a damp meter they are quite cheap on amazon and check in every part of the caravan from floor to ceiling and from front to back anything above 15% is suspect 10 to 12 is standard

Check all the interior panels especially where the cupboards attach to the end panels especially the roof height cupboards for screws pushing through the end panels.

Light fittings often have missing screws, also there is a light above the microwave at ceiling height check it work with a switch mine had to be disconnected as it was on all the time.

Check the glass splash panel for the hob where it screws to the side panel for missing rubber grommets and chips along the edges.

Depending on the model check the bed base is level on our 540 the bed sloped down from the hinged side by 1cm enough to make you roll onto the wife.

Check the brush seal for the shower door both of ours were bowed on fitting.

Check all the worktop surfaces for damage especially the fold out table on the front draws when I unfolded ours it still had manufacturing debris under it which put dint into the table top, also check for dull areas as they may have tried to cover the damage with wax filler which when dry is dull.

Check the strips that cover panel joints inside the van.

By now you will realise that you need to check every part of the van fully.

Write down everything you find and before I get slated for saying this any fault is a reason to reject it no matter how small.

If everything is ok, go away in the van for at least a week for a good shake down.

 

If a van requires all that depth of checking,over and above the "normal" checks then I think I would definitely be looking elsewhere.

 

Ian

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I don't think the dealer would appreciate all the little pinholes from a cheep damp meter :blink:

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I don't think the dealer would appreciate all the little pinholes from a cheep damp meter :blink:

No they wouldn't, but other meters are available that do not make the holes. As a matter of course I always insist on a damp test done by the dealer as part of his PDI. I consider that a very important point before I sign on the line. Only possible on the Unicorn on the floor but they did it.

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Hi Deltaowner,

No amount of arguing with the dealers would have got a new panel Elddis said no the caps are a recognised repair alternative that the industry accepts.

 

I am sorry but it is not for the consumer to accept what the industry decided is "acceptable" as it is the consumer who paid for the goods. All a cap is doing is disguising a fault which is known as a work around. It is not a repair that we would accept however it is your caravan and your choice.

 

If a van requires all that depth of checking,over and above the "normal" checks then I think I would definitely be looking elsewhere.

 

Ian

 

With the exception of doing a damp check, I think that all caravans shoudl be checked thoroughly prior to signing along the dotted line. Intransient has supplied a good check list applicable to any brand of caravan.

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I am sorry but it is not for the consumer to accept what the industry decided is "acceptable" as it is the consumer who paid for the goods. All a cap is doing is disguising a fault which is known as a work around. It is not a repair that we would accept however it is your caravan and your choice.

 

With the exception of doing a damp check, I think that all caravans shoudl be checked thoroughly prior to signing along the dotted line. Intransient has supplied a good check list applicable to any brand of caravan.

 

Apparently, these so called caps to hide an obvious fault, are also fitted by Swift.

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I am sorry but it is not for the consumer to accept what the industry decided is "acceptable" as it is the consumer who paid for the goods. All a cap is doing is disguising a fault which is known as a work around. It is not a repair that we would accept however it is your caravan and your choice.

 

 

 

I too wouldn't be happy with caps fitted to cover cracks. Unfortunately we have no alternative but to accept the manufacturers/dealers repair if it is the industry recognised repair. Presumably the makers deem it a repair that will not allow water ingress.

This kind of "fix" is not just confined to the caravan industry.

An often reported fault on a leading brand of HGV's was the engine getting too warm with the needle in the yellow section of the temp gauge. The fix? A different gauge with the yellow section now part of the green band. The 'faults' were no longer reported. None of the trucks suffered overheating damage because of this "modification". In the case of a cracking panel it's pointless just replacing the panel if it's likely to crack again.

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Thanks everyone for your support/advice.

 

To date we have after paying the original deposit on cc (£1000 I forgot this was how we paid the deposit), we have placed the matter with them for now advising the dealer we also intend to go thro the Small Claims court.

 

Nogger, when you go to collect your new van dont let them rush you to sign and take the van. We had to have all the locker doors replaced, chipped enamel sink. Several internal furniture components replaced & then after 11 months the shower cubicle cracked around the waste - replaced under the warranty.

 

Will let you know what happens. .. thanks again.

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Nogger,

 

Should you decide to change your choice of van,does your dealer sell other makes ?

 

If so perhaps they may let you move your £1k deposit to another manufacturer.

 

Ian

When I bought my present van with a list price of around £20k (I had a substantial reduction as the Vat was deducted with the sales offer) my dealership asked for a substantial deposit. I gave him £200. The sale was also dependant on a full damp check being carried out in my presence prior to my acceptance. To loose £1,000 for any reason would be annoying. To loose £200 a much lesser irritation.

Edited by Easy T

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When I bought my present van with a list price of around £20k (I had a substantial reduction as the Vat was deducted with the sales offer) my dealership asked for a substantial deposit. I gave him £200. The sale was also dependant on a full damp check being carried out in my presence prior to my acceptance. To loose £1,000 for any reason would be annoying. To loose £200 a much lesser irritation.

 

I'm never quite sure why dealers demand a large deposit. When you order a new 'van there is usually a lead time of months, so presumably the manufacturer is having difficulty supplying enough to meet demand. Surly any cancelled order that a dealer may get will just put a much wanted caravan in his stock so the customer who does want it doesn't have such a long waiting time.

Edited by chrisbee

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I'm never quite sure why dealers demand a large deposit. When you order a new 'van there is usually a lead time of months, so presumably the manufacturer is having difficulty supplying enough to meet demand. Surly any cancelled order that a dealer may get will just put a much wanted caravan in his stock so the customer who does want it doesn't have such a long waiting time.

My view as well. The dealership I referred to wanted more than £200, I think that initially they wanted 5% of the book price - around £1000. They were happy to accept £200.

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I'm never quite sure why dealers demand a large deposit. When you order a new 'van there is usually a lead time of months, so presumably the manufacturer is having difficulty supplying enough to meet demand. Surly any cancelled order that a dealer may get will just put a much wanted caravan in his stock so the customer who does want it doesn't have such a long waiting time.

I think the reason could be that at £200 people will order and then cancel at the last momemt and are prepared to lose £200. A deposit of £1000 ensures this does not happen and the dealer is not out of pocket.

Edited by DeltaTIowner

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I think the reason could be that at £200 people will order and then cancel at the last momemt and are prepared to lose £200. A deposit of £1000 ensures this does not happen and the dealer is not out of pocket.

 

My point is that the £200. 00 would more than cover the dealers costs until he sells the 'van a couple of days later. Why does he need £1000. 00 ?

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My point is that the £200. 00 would more than cover the dealers costs until he sells the 'van a couple of days later. Why does he need £1000. 00 ?

My view also.

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My honest and frank caravan dealer friend admits that the touring caravan industry is still stuck in the 70's, just like the car industry of that era sending our poor quality products to polite and timid customers. Until we kick up a fuss and refuse to accept poor quality construction, failure by dealers to carry out a PDI, and indifference in dealing with faults, nothing will change. I run a 400 unit storage caravan facility. I am fed up handing back expensive, poorly built and ill prepared products to dealers who lose interest once the owner has paid. I see brand new caravans with a complete absence of bulkhead bolts and screws, causing them to creak and come loose off the chassis, as well as countless water ingress issues, and brittle interiors and fitments. I speak with caravan owners and service engineers who find "faulty" water systems totally dry, meaning they have never been filled, commissioned or tested before delivery....Shameful!!!  I myself I have owned two `German tourers [not faultless but built with some care] and would never hand money to British manufacturers who continue to take the mickey out of its customers! Remember what happened to British car makers who took their buyers for granted??? .... Bust!

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This is a 3 year old thread but thank you for your insight into a perennial problem, looking at the problem from a different perspective. 

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7 hours ago, Hojay said:

My honest and frank caravan dealer friend admits that the touring caravan industry is still stuck in the 70's, just like the car industry of that era sending our poor quality products to polite and timid customers. Until we kick up a fuss and refuse to accept poor quality construction, failure by dealers to carry out a PDI, and indifference in dealing with faults, nothing will change. I run a 400 unit storage caravan facility. I am fed up handing back expensive, poorly built and ill prepared products to dealers who lose interest once the owner has paid. I see brand new caravans with a complete absence of bulkhead bolts and screws, causing them to creak and come loose off the chassis, as well as countless water ingress issues, and brittle interiors and fitments. I speak with caravan owners and service engineers who find "faulty" water systems totally dry, meaning they have never been filled, commissioned or tested before delivery....Shameful!!!  I myself I have owned two `German tourers [not faultless but built with some care] and would never hand money to British manufacturers who continue to take the mickey out of its customers! Remember what happened to British car makers who took their buyers for granted??? .... Bust!

 

I am surprised we have not seen a influx of far east industries like the Japanese and Malaysian car manufacturers .

 

The thread is 3 years old but could be 33 years old but the story is the same unless people change their buying ?

 

Dave

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In the past three years we bought a 2016 Elddis caravan, had issues with panels and rejected the caravan after 11 months.  This clearly demonstrates that although the Explorer Group knew about the issues with panels on 2015 and earlier caravans they did nothing to improve the panels!  I think the same mentality applies to all manufacturers who hope to "get away" with poor quality caravans as the onus is passed onto the dealerships.

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I rejected our Elddis last year, and had a look at the same model later in the year at the NEC. The two significant structural faults in my van were evident in the 2019 display model also.

 

As for the onus being passed on to the dealers, they have an easy way of resolving this, they simply pass the onus onto the customer.

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On 21/07/2019 at 11:49, thebriars said:

I rejected our Elddis last year, and had a look at the same model later in the year at the NEC. The two significant structural faults in my van were evident in the 2019 display model also.

 

As for the onus being passed on to the dealers, they have an easy way of resolving this, they simply pass the onus onto the customer.

Most dealers leave it to the customer to do the PDI and quality checks.

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On 28/01/2016 at 19:49, chrisbee said:

 

I too wouldn't be happy with caps fitted to cover cracks. Unfortunately we have no alternative but to accept the manufacturers/dealers repair if it is the industry recognised repair. Presumably the makers deem it a repair that will not allow water ingress.

This kind of "fix" is not just confined to the caravan industry.

An often reported fault on a leading brand of HGV's was the engine getting too warm with the needle in the yellow section of the temp gauge. The fix? A different gauge with the yellow section now part of the green band. The 'faults' were no longer reported. None of the trucks suffered overheating damage because of this "modification". In the case of a cracking panel it's pointless just replacing the panel if it's likely to crack again.

A long time ago, when I was an Army aircraft technician, in Aden, they fitted fatigue meters to Beaver aircraft. After a few weeks, due to the rough ground that they landed on, the meters were showing that the airframes were fatigue expired. Answer, take the meters out and carry on! Those same airframes are still flying, mainly in Canada, over thirty years later.

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33 minutes ago, colonel said:

A long time ago, when I was an Army aircraft technician, in Aden, they fitted fatigue meters to Beaver aircraft. After a few weeks, due to the rough ground that they landed on, the meters were showing that the airframes were fatigue expired. Answer, take the meters out and carry on! Those same airframes are still flying, mainly in Canada, over thirty years later.

Then you probably will be very interested in the read African Sunrise by Captain Roy Downes.  Mentioned the Beavers used in Africa and then strong and bad points.  Can be downloaded off Amazon.  :)

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