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An Interesting Read....................


Tandem Man
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I hope they have one fitted to the rear of the sealant gun. .. :D

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I hope they have one fitted to the rear of the sealant gun. .. :D

Somebody would be sacked every day if they did eh!!!!!

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The worrying thing is, these vans are assembled in less time than a service should take. less than 3. 5 hours. :o

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I don't understand how a barcode can keep track of who installed the side wall . A barcode is a 7 or 13 digit number, they are unique but mean nothing, so a side wall with a barcode comes along and the fitter scans (the bailey office has determined that that perticular barcode means nearside side wall) then fits the wall, the barcode can't tell who fitted it. The only way to tell who installed the wall is to cross match who was working in that area that day, it's like going to ASDA and buying a can of beans & by looking at the receipt knowing who sold you the beans. Bailey are just trying to make out they are all high tech when there not .

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I don't understand how a barcode can keep track of who installed the side wall . A barcode is a 7 or 13 digit number, they are unique but mean nothing, so a side wall with a barcode comes along and the fitter scans (the bailey office has determined that that perticular barcode means nearside side wall) then fits the wall, the barcode can't tell who fitted it. The only way to tell who installed the wall is to cross match who was working in that area that day, it's like going to ASDA and buying a can of beans & by looking at the receipt knowing who sold you the beans. Bailey are just trying to make out they are all high tech when there not .

The barcode identifies the part, if the fitter carries a personal reader, when they scan the barcode it logs it on their reader, which can the be collated to show who fitted what on which caravan.

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The worrying thing is, these vans are assembled in less time than a service should take. less than 3. 5 hours. :o

 

There's nothing intrinsically wrong with putting a van together in 3. 5 hours as long as it is designed and engineered to be built satisfactorily in that time frame.

 

An awful lot more time will have been expended manufacturing the components and parts which are obviously designed, selected and sequenced for ease of construction, so the final build time is relatively irrelevant. Additional time would mean inefficient use of machinery and/or labour.

I've got nothing to do on this hot afternoon

but to settle down and write you a line.

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I think you will find that 3 1/2 hours is the assembly time for the stages on the line. You would have to add to that the sub assembly time, and then add to that the manufacturing process time for all the bought out equipment. There may additionally be some off line work (special processes and additional equipment like factory options) (oh! and also some time for work which is not included in the times for example manual handling by additional labour)

Edited by Ern
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