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Petemargaret
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Hi,been thinking of changing my car, a VW Tiguan, pulls my Bailey Orion as if it's not on.

Looked at a Honda CR-V 1. 6 diesel, according to the manual it should pull 2 ton.

I can't believe that it is capable of doing it. We go through the Pyrenees,just don't think it has the guts to do the job.

Has anyone else any information about this,everything else about the car is good

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According to someone who had the 2. 2 and now the 1. 6 it doesn't pull as well uphill.

 

I think the post is on the CC forum.

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Why not have another Tiguan? Good tug with a brilliantly economic engine, naughty software or not.

 

An alternative is a Passat. We have a 140bhp TDi estate and it tows our Pegasus beautifully - so long as you don't look at the fuel consumption!

 

I think you will find that the 140/177bhp options of your vehicle are now 150/186bhp or 150/236bhp for the Passat.

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:welcome:

 

"pulls my Bailey Orion as if it's not on"

 

Blimey, must be a brilliant tug.

Even I notice the big white box wobbling along behind me with my supposedly best in class tow car. :)

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Hi,been thinking of changing my car, a VW Tiguan, pulls my Bailey Orion as if it's not on.

Looked at a Honda CR-V 1. 6 diesel, according to the manual it should pull 2 ton.

I can't believe that it is capable of doing it. We go through the Pyrenees,just don't think it has the guts to do the job.

Has anyone else any information about this,everything else about the car is good

 

Hi Petermargaret. I can personally recommend the Volvo V70 D5 SE Geartronic but the 163bhp variant allegedly a better bet than the 185bhp model. The Geartronic box is an absolute peach to use.

 

I am on my 7th V70 and my 2nd V70 D5 SE Geartronic. Superbly comfortable car and incredible load lugger as well as being an exceptionally capable tow-car.

Life in general can be a journey of chance with some winners and sadly some losers. Your outfit can never be left to chance. A short-while carrying out essential checks can ensure a long-time of happy & safe caravanning for all concerned.
Ignorance can often be bliss but is certainly not an excuse and when continually disregarded they can be totally disastrous for oneself and the innocent parties.

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Sounds as though you're really happy with your Tiguan. Why not go for the latest model? I'm not saying that the CRV is a bad car car but . ...... ?

 

John. :)

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The trouble with the small capacity twin turbo engines is that you have to keep the revs up.

Lose the revs and the power literally dies, which is why people report issues on hills.

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Looked at a Honda CR-V 1. 6 diesel, according to the manual it should pull 2 ton.

 

 

We've been looking at these as well, and can't make up our minds.

 

For information, the brochure states that the auto only tows 1500kg.

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Are there not some really good bargains on the VW forecourts?

Adventure before dementia.

Saving for a Caravisio !!

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Cant comment on the 1. 6 but our 2. 2 manual CRV is brilliant. Came over the Pyrenees via Pau last month, absolutely no problem. (Car and caravan were fully loaded).

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There ain't no substitute for cubic capacity!

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There ain't no substitute for cubic capacity!

 

Simply not true in this age of turbo and super chargers

The trouble with the small capacity twin turbo engines is that you have to keep the revs up.

Lose the revs and the power literally dies, which is why people report issues on hills.

 

I have never understood why so many people are absolutely obsessed with keeping revs down. Using the full rev range appropriately does no harm to the engine and when power is needed does no harm to fuel consumption.

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Simply not true in this age of turbo and super chargers

 

I have never understood why so many people are absolutely obsessed with keeping revs down. Using the full rev range appropriately does no harm to the engine and when power is needed does no harm to fuel consumption.

RPM uses fuel, your cruising RPM should be about 2. 5K on petrol and 1800 diesel, but as you say does no harm to the engine, just your pocket :unsure:

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RPM uses fuel, your cruising RPM should be about 2. 5K on petrol and 1800 diesel, but as you say does no harm to the engine, just your pocket :unsure:

 

Cruising, yes but for serious hills or acceleration many petrol engines are happy up to, or even over 6,000rpm for short periods and petrol engines, unlike diesels are actually at their most fuel efficient under load at higher rpms. Diesels, however deliver best efficiency at low revs and light throttle, just what petrol engines hate but most of our normal driving is.

 

My point is, particularly with a petrol engine, you simply will not get the best out of it if you do not let it rev when it needs to.

Edited by Stevan
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Cruising, yes but for serious hills or acceleration many petrol engines are happy up to, or even over 6,000rpm for short periods and petrol engines, unlike diesels are actually at their most fuel efficient under load at higher rpms. Diesels, however deliver best efficiency at low revs and light throttle, just what petrol engines hate but most of our normal driving is.

 

My point is, particularly with a petrol engine, you simply will not get the best out of it if you do not let it rev when it needs to.

Diesels are most efficient, as are petrol engines in their mid range RPM that's why generators don't run a high RPM

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I have never understood why so many people are absolutely obsessed with keeping revs down.

 

Its called mechanical sympathy

 

Something thats always served me well over the years

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Its called mechanical sympathy

 

Something thats always served me well over the years

In my book, "mechanical sympathy" includes knowing whether an engine is singing at high revs or straining at low revs. Formula one engines sing at about 19,000 rpm, most car petrol engines are happy at 5-6,000 rpm, that's why the red line is at about 6,500rpm.

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The trouble with the small capacity twin turbo engines is that you have to keep the revs up.

Lose the revs and the power literally dies, which is why people report issues on hills.

The 1. 6 engine has around the same torque and power, so in theory should perform as well, the auto has 9 gears now which again you would expect to aid towing?

Simply not true in this age of turbo and super chargers

 

 

I have never understood why so many people are absolutely obsessed with keeping revs down. Using the full rev range appropriately does no harm to the engine and when power is needed does no harm to fuel consumption.

The reason is fuel consumption.

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In my book, "mechanical sympathy" includes knowing whether an engine is singing at high revs or straining at low revs. Formula one engines sing at about 19,000 rpm, most car petrol engines are happy at 5-6,000 rpm, that's why the red line is at about 6,500rpm.

 

All well and good if the operator can tell the difference between singing and screaming. :)

 

John.

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RPM uses fuel, your cruising RPM should be about 2. 5K on petrol and 1800 diesel, but as you say does no harm to the engine, just your pocket :unsure:

Coo isn't that a bit of an old fashioned premis with today's high revving engines?

 

Looking at the power curve of typically the Koleos twin cam turbo D at 1800 rpm it's not even starting to breath . .....

Its called mechanical sympathy

 

Something thats always served me well over the years

Hmm teaching advanced motorcycling one of the issues with the more mature rider is them always wanting to get in as high a gear as possible all the time.

 

It's not so necessary with today's high revving engines: keep them on the boil and the power is there immediately whenever you need it.

Adventure before dementia.

Saving for a Caravisio !!

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Coo isn't that a bit of an old fashioned premis with today's high revving engines?

 

Looking at the power curve of typically the Koleos twin cam turbo D at 1800 rpm it's not even starting to breath . .....

 

Hmm teaching advanced motorcycling one of the issues with the more mature rider is them always wanting to get in as high a gear as possible all the time.

 

It's not so necessary with today's high revving engines: keep them on the boil and the power is there immediately whenever you need it.

Seems to me that it is most economical at 2100rpm whatever speed that is, not a brilliant engine for towing

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Seems to me that it is most economical at 2100rpm whatever speed that is, not a brilliant engine for towing

Yeh I tend to keep it at about 2000 rpm using that underused device called the constant mesh gearbox.

 

It's not a slogger but get into the right gear and it will accelerate on the steepest hills I've come across so far.

 

Modern turbo diesels won't slog away at 1500rpm in any gear like the old normally aspirated engines used to.

Edited by Motobiman

Adventure before dementia.

Saving for a Caravisio !!

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On the petrol comments the tables are turning, the new breed of turbo petrols have high torque at lower rpm than the same capacity diesels on some models. They are sometimes smoother and more responsive at low rpm than the newer diesels

 

Take the BMW 2. 0 with 258lbft available from just 1250rpm to 4800rpm.

 

No high revs required unless you want to access the full 250bhp @ 5200rpm - 6500rpm

 

Lee

Edited by logiclee

Yeti 2.0TDi EU6 150 DSG 4X4 L&K, Octavia TSi Manual, Fabia TSi DSG, Swift Challenger.

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Yeh I tend to keep it at about 2000 rpm using that underused device called the constant mesh gearbox.

 

It's not a slogger but get into the right gear and it will accelerate on the steepest hills I've come across so far.

 

Modern turbo diesels won't slog away at 1500rpm in any gear like the old normally aspirated engines used to.

My engine will.

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My engine will.

Course it does, it's auto. Edited by Motobiman

Adventure before dementia.

Saving for a Caravisio !!

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