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Gutted By Wind!


Durbanite
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Yesterday we went out to drop off a birthday card for the grand daughter in Kidderminster. On arrival the wife opened the door and a strong gust of wind caught it and took it out of her hand.

Sadly this has done something to the door and now when you open or close it, it catches on the front mudguard. Also as you are travelling along, the wind noise is now horrendous.

 

I am guessing that the door has shifted out of alignment and we will need to visit a panel beater or someone maybe mechanic for them to re-align the door. I have had a look and it does seem that I can do anything about it. An expense we could do without just before Christmas!

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I presume you have bent the hinge. Do you know anyone who could remove it and straighten it

out for you. Possibly time consuming, but fairly easy job.

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The Christmas before last this happened to me in a car park on Whitby harbour. No damage to the Alfa (which had very heavy doors) but a big dent in the Ford next to us.

 

I still get calls from those damned compensation companies trying to convince me that I must have suffered whiplash during the "accident" due to the claim on my insurance. :angry:

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The Christmas before last this happened to me in a car park on Whitby harbour. No damage to the Alfa (which had very heavy doors) but a big dent in the Ford next to us.

 

I still get calls from those damned compensation companies trying to convince me that I must have suffered whiplash during the "accident" due to the claim on my insurance. :angry:

LOL! Taking it down to a recommended old fashion type "cornershop" panel beater later this morning so will see what transpires. Hopefully it will just need to be re-aligned.

 

BTW why do many companies pay big money to advertise in the Yellow pages and Yell. co. uk and never answer their phone or respond to a message?

Edited by DeltaTIowner
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LOL! Taking it down to a recommended old fashion type "cornershop" panel beater later this morning so will see what transpires. Hopefully it will just need to be re-aligned.

 

BTW why do many companies pay big money to advertise in the Yellow pages and Yell. co. uk and never answer their phone or respond to a message?

 

Because they have gone out of business due to massive overheads.

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I saw a chap "lose" his door in the wind, he had difficulty in closing it,

he called me over to view the misfortune and started talking about the

hinges but I could see a slight crease by the hinges and a dent around

the second part of the door hold back. it would not close properly

I donated some duct tape to hold the door closed and sealed against the

weather and he finished hitching up and drove off.

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We've had this happen on our Renault minibus. To unbend the hinges,I cut two small pieces of hard wood and put them in the hinges so they were trapped as the door tried to close. I then gently pushed the door against them,springing the hinges back to shape. I kept removing the wood and trying to close the door to be sure I didnt go too far the other way. The hinges are often welded on so removing them isn't an easy option. I think this is the price we pay for having nice tight panel gaps!

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We have been quoted £150 for the repair which apparently entails removing the door to bend the hinge back in place. Looking at it from the outside, the door is away from the body at the top by about 3mm and just enough for a small section to catch on the bodywork as you open the door. TBH not sure if the hinge itself is bent as it looks like a very heavy duty hinge.

I am no expert, but the last time it happened, it took the panel beater about 15 minutes to rectify and he did not want any payment, but gave him £10 anyway. Sadly he has closed up shop. I think I need to shop around a bit as £150 does not sound right.


It may be simple like adjusting the hinges but if the A-post itself has been twisted that could be expensive.

A post is okay and hinges can be removed as they are not welded to body.

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I suggest the block and bend method as mentioned by Dobloseven, many cars these days only have adjustments on the door or A post the hinge is welded to one of them. The hinges are fairly strong but where the hinge is connected is weak either the door or A post.

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I suggest the block and bend method as mentioned by Dobloseven, many cars these days only have adjustments on the door or A post the hinge is welded to one of them. The hinges are fairly strong but where the hinge is connected is weak either the door or A post.

Corrosion and metal fatique can also weaken the door and A-post on an older vehicle.

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Corrosion and metal fatique can also weaken the door and A-post on an older vehicle.

That'll really cheer him up!

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Well I fix dents for a living, and I have seen a lot of damage made worse by people who did not know what they are doing. £150, for sure shop around but if that is for a good job then it will be money well spent.

 

This is my site

 

www. lincolnshiredents. co. uk

 

if it was my car it would be going off to a panel beater/bodyrepair tech who knows what he is doing.

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Should the thread title be GUSTED by wind . ...........

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Should the thread title be GUSTED by wind . ...........

When I first saw the topic title I thought the OP meant flatulence. ;)

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When I first saw the topic title I thought the OP meant flatulence. ;)

When it happened, Yes there was!

 

Shows you can't be too careful.

At least I did not have to change my underwear! :D :D

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Decided to take a drive around where we used to live and find a body shop that will do the repair for a reasonable price. At the first place where we stopped I recognised the old man from a pub that we used to frequent many years ago. Anyway he had a look at the door and got one of his chaps to have a look and do a fix.

A bit of board and a heavy duty screwdriver and the door was opening an closing without catching. He did not want any money for the job so saved us £150. We will be making a special trip to the pub where he has a drink after hours to buy him a pint or three. :D

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Decided to take a drive around where we used to live and find a body shop that will do the repair for a reasonable price. At the first place where we stopped I recognised the old man from a pub that we used to frequent many years ago. Anyway he had a look at the door and got one of his chaps to have a look and do a fix.

A bit of board and a heavy duty screwdriver and the door was opening an closing without catching. He did not want any money for the job so saved us £150. We will be making a special trip to the pub where he has a drink after hours to buy him a pint or three. :D

I there are some good folks about. I've met a few ;)

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