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Skoda Yeti Confusion


sampvt
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I bought a new 2014 model skoda yeti 2 litre diesel car which the book said was a 1500kg max tugger. The gross vehicle weight is down as 1950kg with a 600kg payload and the kerb weight is 1350kg. On the tow car calculation this car is supposed to be a perfect match for any caravan up to a laden weight of 1325kg.

 

How can this be, given the fact that the 1350kg kerb weight puts the max towing weight on the 85% rule, well under 1200kg. I am so confused and worry about how and what we are doing. Under a typical towing scenario, my wife and I plus the stuff we take (which goes on the car) puts our car at around 1550kg loaded and the caravan is 1280kg loaded. Naturally this scenario falls within the legal gross train weight and the 85% rule is about right, but we were told that the towing factors are not based on the car laden, its based on the kerb weight and Skoda still insists that 1500kg is my max towing weight.

 

The car is 110 psi and when the car is full and the caravan is on the back laden up to 1280kg, I do struggle on some hills. Also there is a pretty pronounced clutch smell after a long journey and I fear I might be killing the car. Does anyone have any experience of this vehicle and what these figures by skoda represent.

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As far as I can see, the tow car calculation is wrong if it's based on a 85% weight ratio. The other figures, those from Skoda, seem reasonably plausible to me although I find a kerbweight of 1452kg for a 2. 0l TDI on the Skoda website that I've had a look at.

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The maximum towing weight is just that, the maximum weight that can be towed. There is no 85% rule, there is an advisory 85% of the vehicles kerb weight ( that varies depending on definition) for drivers new to towing caravans, it has no legal standing and is a percentage set in the dark ages. There has been considerable discussion on this and other forums as to whether it is now pertinent.

The BHP/PS when towing is not really applicable but with a 2. 0l engine one would expect a torque figure of over 350Nm at 1800 rpm to tow reasonably, preferably maximum torque should be as low as possible rpm.

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The 2WD Yeti is 110, the 4x4 Yeti comes as 140 or 170

the 140 and 170 are heavier. Fred went to a 140 for "better"

towing.

I tow with a 110 2WD the van is 1076kg and is easy to tow

with but struggles a little on steep hills

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I WAS THINKING OF MAPPING THE ENGINE FROM 110 UP TO 145, is this a good idea and will it improve the tugging capabilities.

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The kerb weight used in Towcar is 1445. The extra presumably due to 75kg driver allowance and weight of 90% full tank as generally included but not always in manufacturers kerbweights.

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The BHP/PS when towing is not really applicable but with a 2. 0l engine one would expect a torque figure of over 350Nm at 1800 rpm to tow reasonably, preferably maximum torque should be as low as possible rpm.

 

Actually, the 2. 0l TDI only has a max torque of 250Nm and that at a relatively high rpm of 1750 to 3000 but the BHP/PS most definitely is applicable because that's what gets you up the hill, not the torque.

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I WAS THINKING OF MAPPING THE ENGINE FROM 110 UP TO 145, is this a good idea and will it improve the tugging capabilities.

I was looking at the Celtic tuning company, either straight mapping or

their box which retains the engines current map + a tuned map for more

torque.

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I WAS THINKING OF MAPPING THE ENGINE FROM 110 UP TO 145, is this a good idea and will it improve the tugging capabilities.

 

I'd recommend re-mapping, but you might need to be careful re your new car warranty. If you have an engine related issue and the dealer finds the re-map it may invalidate your warranty.

 

Had mine re-mapped from 140 BHP to 175BHP, solo MPG is up, especially around town, longer solo trips MPG is up too, but only a little, generally mid 60's MPG is regular on longer journeys. Big jump in available torque though. There is a small improvement in towing MPG, but it definitely pulls more easily, can cruise at 60 mph on the level in 6th at about 1800 rpm.

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Are you sure the clutch smell is actually the clutch and not binding brakes on the car or caravan?

 

Is the smell noitceable after you park on a journey, or after siting the van? Whatever it is it doesn't sound right.

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Are you sure the clutch smell is actually the clutch and not binding brakes on the car or caravan?

 

Is the smell noitceable after you park on a journey, or after siting the van? Whatever it is it doesn't sound right.

 

Firstly let me say it smells like clutch plate burn. It isn't the caravan brakes because ive had 3 vans on that car and the result is always the same, the vans towed were my old one which was 1300kg laden, my new one which is 1280kg laden and my mates van which was 1325kg. All vans were verified on a tow bridge scale so \I know the weights were right.

 

I am 63 and a good driver. I don't ride the clutch and am not a fast driver. I take note of the engine noise and change up and down according to needs. When I towed my new van home, it was a 40 mile journey and to a degree the van and car were pretty much low weight and the clutch still smelled. It smells like wet burning clothing with a hint of plastic thrown in. Defo not brakes or anything electrical. The smell is far greater when the bonnet is opened and I cant smell anything inside the cab.

 

The local mechanic said it sounds like \I am overworking the engine and the clutch is taking a hammering but it does not slip. The other thing that is really strange is that this car has had a complete clutch and gear box overhaul after the gearbox ceased on a normal journey without the van hooked up in fact it hadn't towed a van for ages when it went. It wasn't a towing issue because we had a motorhome at the time, the car hadn't towed anything for 9 months and I have only just started towing again but the same smell is the same as the old smell I used to get from the old gearbox so it cant be a clutch issue as its been changed in between vans.

 

The main reason why I am asking is that I was wondering if the ceased clutch issues might have been a contributory factor to the old clutch ceasing and could it happen again with this new van and new gearbox. That's why I am worried.

Edited by sampvt
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If it is the clutch (and I am not saying it is or it isn't) and it is making a smell, it is slipping! a friction clutch which is not slipping will not heat up and so will not smell.

 

If the clutch is not slipping then it may well be the brakes which are having to work harder than usual due to the extra weight (not that I am suggesting you should lay off the pies!) :D

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Actually, the 2. 0l TDI only has a max torque of 250Nm and that at a relatively high rpm of 1750 to 3000 but the BHP/PS most definitely is applicable because that's what gets you up the hill, not the torque.

Only if you are in the bhp rpm range otherwise torque keeps you moving uphill or along the flat. Providing the torque is sufficient to overcome the weight of the vehicle on the gradient the vehicle will climb the hill the gearbox will multiply that torque at the wheels, the bhp will cut in when the torque has gone.

A stuck brake smells like a burning clutch as does a DPF regeneration

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Firstly let me say it smells like clutch plate burn. It isn't the caravan brakes because ive had 3 vans on that car and the result is always the same, the vans towed were my old one which was 1300kg laden, my new one which is 1280kg laden and my mates van which was 1325kg. All vans were verified on a tow bridge scale so \I know the weights were right.

 

I am 63 and a good driver. I don't ride the clutch and am not a fast driver. I take note of the engine noise and change up and down according to needs. When I towed my new van home, it was a 40 mile journey and to a degree the van and car were pretty much low weight and the clutch still smelled. It smells like wet burning clothing with a hint of plastic thrown in. Defo not brakes or anything electrical. The smell is far greater when the bonnet is opened and I cant smell anything inside the cab.

 

The local mechanic said it sounds like \I am overworking the engine and the clutch is taking a hammering but it does not slip. The other thing that is really strange is that this car has had a complete clutch and gear box overhaul after the gearbox ceased on a normal journey without the van hooked up in fact it hadn't towed a van for ages when it went. It wasn't a towing issue because we had a motorhome at the time, the car hadn't towed anything for 9 months and I have only just started towing again but the same smell is the same as the old smell I used to get from the old gearbox so it cant be a clutch issue as its been changed in between vans.

 

The main reason why I am asking is that I was wondering if the ceased clutch issues might have been a contributory factor to the old clutch ceasing and could it happen again with this new van and new gearbox. That's why I am worried.

Possibly handbrake not freeing up completely?

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it cant be a clutch issue as its been changed in between vans.

 

 

 

That doesn`t mean there isn`t a problem with the clutch, though!

 

I had a brand new Ford Orion that had a similar problem with the clutch, which was replaced under warranty. The replacement was just as bad. Turned out to be a bad batch of pressure plates that were visually fine, but not up to the job.

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Only if you are in the bhp rpm range otherwise torque keeps you moving uphill or along the flat. Providing the torque is sufficient to overcome the weight of the vehicle on the gradient the vehicle will climb the hill the gearbox will multiply that torque at the wheels, the bhp will cut in when the torque has gone.

 

No, it's bhp that keeps you moving uphill or along the flat. Bhp is basically torque times engine speed so if you haven't got the torque you can still make up for it with more revs. This is especially true for turbines which develop very little torque but still provide the horsepower needed by running at up to 100,000rpm or more. On the other hand, without the necessary revs even a fantastic torque won't get you up the hill.

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No, it's bhp that keeps you moving uphill or along the flat. Bhp is basically torque times engine speed so if you haven't got the torque you can still make up for it with more revs. This is especially true for turbines which develop very little torque but still provide the horsepower needed by running at up to 100,000rpm or more. On the other hand, without the necessary revs even a fantastic torque won't get you up the hill.

0 x 500bhp =0

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0 x 500bhp =0

 

It's 0 x 500Nm = 0bhp, not 0 x 500bhp = 0

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Are you challenging James Watt - your argument seems to suggest that you are.

 

 

It's 0 x 500Nm = 0bhp, not 0 x 500bhp = 0

Doesn't matter what you multiply by 0 it equals 0

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Doesn't matter what you multiply by 0 it equals 0

So - using your logic, an electric motor which produces almost infinitely high torque at start up would be fine with a 10 bhp rating - whereas a very high revving engine producing low torque but 200 bhp wouldn't?

 

Your logic doesn't take into account that that a low torque high revving engine can be geared down more than a high torque low revving one - and that gearing down increases torque.

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PACK IT IN YOU LOT, stop bickering and cock fighting. stick to the topic please.

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PACK IT IN YOU LOT, stop bickering and cock fighting. stick to the topic please.

Your problem is you need to tow a lighter caravan, or buy a more powerful car.

But you already know that from reading your posts. :)

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So - using your logic, an electric motor which produces almost infinitely high torque at start up would be fine with a 10 bhp rating - whereas a very high revving engine producing low torque but 200 bhp wouldn't?

 

Your logic doesn't take into account that that a low torque high revving engine can be geared down more than a high torque low revving one - and that gearing down increases torque.

I think you misunderstand, one is a mathematical fact, anything multiplied by 0 is 0, however any form of engine/motor has a combination of both torque and BHP the moment it rotates, I think you will find I mentioned gearing in one of my posts. Torque on an electric motor is dependent on windings and the arrangement of the windings.

It would seem that fishing on this forum is easy :D :D

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