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Fitting A Motor Mover


Durbanite
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My gut feeling is that having the mover on the rear wheels is better as the front wheels could be lifted by the jockey wheel depending on slope of pitch etc. On our currentc aravan they fitted the mover on the front wheels due to the location of the jacking point and the ALKO spare wheel carrier.

However is it better to have a motor mover on the front or rear wheels of a twin axle and why?

Edited by DeltaTIowner
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To be honest it does not make much difference where the mover is fitted on a twin axle van as there will always be tyre scrub from the non driven wheels and it makes no difference to the overall turning circle.

You will never be able to turn a twin on its axis, as you can with a single axle van.

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I only have experience of single axle.

They fit mover in front because it is easier due to spare wheel being behind axle.

Just hit something, a rock, a kerb, with mover and it moves onto tyre and you can go no where, got the T shirt.

Next time mine will be fitted at the rear.

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Quote " They fit mover in front because it is easier due to spare wheel being behind axle."

 

The reason to fit in front of the axle is actually to reduce the amount of road spray thrown up and over the mover.

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I only have experience of single axle.

They fit mover in front because it is easier due to spare wheel being behind axle.

Just hit something, a rock, a kerb, with mover and it moves onto tyre and you can go no where, got the T shirt.

Next time mine will be fitted at the rear.

Surely it is just as likely that a rearward fitted mover could suffer the same fate when going down a kerb or over rocks?

 

Hitting rocks and kerbs seems to indicate the need for an All terrain mover.

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Surely it is just as likely that a rearward fitted mover could suffer the same fate when going down a kerb or over rocks?

 

Hitting rocks and kerbs seems to indicate the need for an All terrain mover.

No not as likely to push onto tyre (s), more likely to push away than front mounted where it will push onto tyre and stop you moving caravan until you get mechanic to remove it.

I was stranded on filling station for over an hour whilst GreenFlag came and loosened mounting to move it off tyre.

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No not as likely to push onto tyre (s), more likely to push away than front mounted where it will push onto tyre and stop you moving caravan until you get mechanic to remove it.

I was stranded on filling station for over an hour whilst GreenFlag came and loosened mounting to move it off tyre.

I note that you have a Powrtouch mover and am intrigued as to how the roller or perhaps the whole assembly was jammed onto the tyre? I have had a Powrtouch Evolution manual mover recently fitted to my caravan and I cannot envisage that happening to my mover in similar circumstances without the whole assembly moving.

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I note that you have a Powrtouch mover and am intrigued as to how the roller or perhaps the whole assembly was jammed onto the tyre? I have had a Powrtouch Evolution manual mover recently fitted to my caravan and I cannot envisage that happening to my mover in similar circumstances without the whole assembly moving.

That's exactly what happens. The whole assembly slides along the chassis. It's only clamped on.

Edited by chrisbee
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I note that you have a Powrtouch mover and am intrigued as to how the roller or perhaps the whole assembly was jammed onto the tyre? I have had a Powrtouch Evolution manual mover recently fitted to my caravan and I cannot envisage that happening to my mover in similar circumstances without the whole assembly moving.

Happened to a previous caravan with Reich mover on front.

This Powrtouch was prefitted to this caravan.

Next caravan will have it at rear if buying new.

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That's exactly what happens. The whole assembly slides along the chassis. It's only clamped on.

Whilst I do not doubt it happened I still cannot envisage that happening to my mover if a kerb or a rock hit the mover, with or without the mover being engaged.

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Our mover is fitted on the rear and it has never been pushed into the tyres AND we have been to some places (such as Morocco) with very bumpy roads and caravan sites. :D

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Whilst I do not doubt it happened I still cannot envisage that happening to my mover if a kerb or a rock hit the mover, with or without the mover being engaged.

What do you think would happen to your mover? A kerbstone is more resilient than a chassis clamp. Actually, to a certain extent the fact that the assembly moves when striking a kerb may mean less damage.

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Whilst I do not doubt it happened I still cannot envisage that happening to my mover if a kerb or a rock hit the mover, with or without the mover being engaged.

You might struggle to envisage it but I moved one out of a wheel on a caravan site in France. A UK couple leaving the site must have kerbed their SA. I was walking on the exit road and heard this awful screech coming from behind me. It was this couple just leaving the site with the nearside mover rubbing hard against the tyre. The mover was fully "retracted" but still firmly into the tyre

A few minutes job and I had sorted it for them as they were not at all technical and in great distress; he though the car was not pulling as well as usual.

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What do you think would happen to your mover? A kerbstone is more resilient than a chassis clamp. Actually, to a certain extent the fact that the assembly moves when striking a kerb may mean less damage.

The clearance under the mover seems to be sufficient to clear a normal kerb at slow speed and the clearance in front of the mover is even greater.

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To be honest it does not make much difference where the mover is fitted on a twin axle van as there will always be tyre scrub from the non driven wheels and it makes no difference to the overall turning circle.

You will never be able to turn a twin on its axis, as you can with a single axle van.

Surely if you raise the front of the caravan as much as possible on the jockey wheel you will have less scrubbing and the caravan will turn quicker?

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Surely if you raise the front of the caravan as much as possible on the jockey wheel you will have less scrubbing and the caravan will turn quicker?

I would be concerned that the jockey wheel would be digging in and scrubbing even on a hard standing.

 

It seems to me, having followed this topic from the start, that using movers on only one axle would only give you marginal benefit over your present no movers state.

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The clearance under the mover seems to be sufficient to clear a normal kerb at slow speed and the clearance in front of the mover is even greater.

 

Why? With many AL-Ko chassis the girder beam used aft of the axle plate is a bit shallower than the girder used up front. As both are level with the under floor surface thisresults in the aft mounted mover riding higher. With my SA Hymer Reich recommended aft wheel mounting of their mover; so I did.

Like other contributors I would rather stuff the mover back along the girder than stuff it into a tyre. Think of the consequences if done at higher speeds than done creeping out of a camp site as I referred to above, and that was well graunching.

 

IMO; with a rolling over kerb mover impact, it has some chance of sledging over the mover and as already said will move it back relatively harmlessly.

Edited by JTQ
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Why? With many AL-Ko chassis the girder beam used aft of the axle plate is a bit shallower than the girder used up front. As both are level with the under floor surface thisresults in the aft mounted mover riding higher. With my SA Hymer Reich recommended aft wheel mounting of their mover; so I did.

Like other contributors I would rather stuff the mover back along the girder than stuff it into a tyre. Think of the consequences if done at higher speeds than done creeping out of a camp site as I referred to above, and that was well graunching.

 

IMO; with a rolling over kerb mover impact, it has some chance of sledging over the mover and as already said will move it back relatively harmlessly.

It may be that I am missing something but I am sorry but I still do not understand.

Motor mover fitted in front of nearside caravan wheel

I do not have my caravan available to measure the clearances but the picture shows the nearside mover and I estimate that it is sufficient to clear a normal kerb when the 'van is travelling towards one. For the mover to be "stuffed" into the tyre the kerb would need to be at least 20cm high and the tug would have previously mounted the same kerb hopefully making the driver aware of the obstacle.

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It may be that I am missing something but I am sorry but I still do not understand.

I do not have my caravan available to measure the clearances but the picture shows the nearside mover and I estimate that it is sufficient to clear a normal kerb when the 'van is travelling towards one. For the mover to be "stuffed" into the tyre the kerb would need to be at least 20cm high and the tug would have previously mounted the same kerb hopefully making the driver aware of the obstacle.

Your picture the van is moving to the LEFT there is an obstacle which the front of the mover hits the whole mover moves towards the rear for the distance of the clearance gap of roller and tyre of at the very most 1 inch. Roller jams onto tyre and wheel can't turn, caravan will not move any more.

 

If mover is behind the tyre towards rear of caravan the tyre meets obstacle and climbs it the mover does not hit it as it is higher.

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Your picture the van is moving to the LEFT there is an obstacle which the front of the mover hits the whole mover moves towards the rear for the distance of the clearance gap of roller and tyre of at the very most 1 inch. Roller jams onto tyre and wheel can't turn, caravan will not move any more.

 

If mover is behind the tyre towards rear of caravan the tyre meets obstacle and climbs it the mover does not hit it as it is higher.

Thank you, that is my understanding. However I still think that any obstacle would have to very much higher that the average kerb to collide with the mover.

Edited by DeeTee
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For the mover to be "stuffed" into the tyre the kerb would need to be at least 20cm high and the tug would have previously mounted the same kerb hopefully making the driver aware of the obstacle.

Assuming you have as much as 200 mm normal ground clearance, you will have less with any suspension loading. As the wheel rolls on, mounting the kerb is very likely to be proceeded by traversing some form of gutter or the van be inclined over by the road having a camber towards the kerb.

Edited by JTQ
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Assuming you have as much as 200 mm normal ground clearance, you will have less with any suspension loading. As the wheel rolls on, mounting the kerb is very likely to be proceeded by traversing some form of gutter.

If I were negotiating a kerb whilst towing, as it is likely to be at a slow speed, I would wedges to bridge the gap.

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Not too long ago I saw a mover hit a kerb and get pushed onto the wheel as the driver turned left into the caravan bays at the M4 services. Had the mover have been behind the axle there is a chance the driver would have stopped and reversed when the wheel mounted the kerb.

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I've just had a powrtouch mover fitted to my TA & have it fitted behind rear axle for 3 reasons,,one is so it doesn't catch kerbs etc,,secondly i can raise van with jockey wheel & I makes manoeuvring easier & last one is if on soft ground & wheels start to spin I can again lift front of van putting more weight on rear axle for traction.

 

Andy.

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We have a Delta TI on order. I have asked for the mover to be fitted on the rear wheels for two reasons.

 

1. Easy to raise the jockey wheel to put most of the weight on the rear wheels.

2. There always seems to be a problem with excessive noseweight, so the more weight behind the wheels the better (yes I know its only a small difference but every 5kg helps).

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