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Spanish On Campsites


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You were moaning about the french last week.

 

Are you sure the EU is a good thing? :lol::P:ph34r:

 

H.

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It is only their dogs that are noisy. Coming back home from Spain tomorrow and looking forward to sleeping in quiet rather than the incessant dog barking all day and all night.

Graham

Unless otherwise stated all posts are my personal opinion 

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It is only their dogs that are noisy. Coming back home from Spain tomorrow and looking forward to sleeping in quiet rather than the incessant dog barking all day and all night.

Spanish family arrived opposite us today. Non stop,full volume "conversation" going on. Campsite is totally booked up this coming weekend. Really looking forward to that. ......

Still,their country and all that.

If you think Spanish dogs are bad try central Italy. Dogs barking all night across the valleys!

Sometimes this holiday business is sheer hell. :)

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It is only their dogs that are noisy. Coming back home from Spain tomorrow and looking forward to sleeping in quiet rather than the incessant dog barking all day and all night.

 

How dare you refer to Spanish women in such terms. They spend years learning that amazing shriek to use around the BBQ on a Saturday evening.

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Hey now wait a minute! I had a Spanish Mother and . ....... ok you're right! They can be noisy, but it's just their very hot blooded love of life and family that makes them so excitable. Luckily I am extremely cool. ....... :)

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Hey now wait a minute! I had a Spanish Mother and . ....... :)

Now we know, we should re-name you El Totto!

Graham

Unless otherwise stated all posts are my personal opinion 

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I go away and try and avoid Brits. Miserable people who never stop moaning.

I try not to avoid any nationality and have had hilarious evenings with most. A lot of Russians are still about here on the Costa del Sol though. They are hard to joke with . ....and restaurants suddenly go much quieter when they enter.

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We had 6 Spanish families next to us this year at Camping Almafra, they arrived on the Thursday of Easter weekend & left Monday, the 1st thing they did on arrival was to erect 6 gazebos tied together, with benches & trestle tables inside, barbecues, cookers & a couple of stereos which belted out flamenco rock type music all the time they were there. The kids ran wild & used the surrounding cars & caravans as ball stops for their games of tennis & football. As an earlier poster said it is their country & they are noisy, we will just ensure in future that we plan our trips to avoid Spanish public holidays .

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The Portugese are much the same, very sociable friendly people. My hubby has nearly all Portugese working for him and they are such lovely people who'd do anything for you. We encouraged them to buy a caravan and off they went to Brean sands, invited all their friends for barbecues every night, must have been about 20 of them! They did get a few complaints ;)

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Just wonder if others have had CC ralliers or guided tour groups come on site?

If so then from our experience there would be no critical comments about our other fellow Europeans.

 

I expect it is the same with all groups of any unique nationality, just when it is us we feel so sensitive. Much prefer a nice mix with few travelling as a group.

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We had 6 Spanish families next to us this year at Camping Almafra, they arrived on the Thursday of Easter weekend & left Monday, the 1st thing they did on arrival was to erect 6 gazebos tied together, with benches & trestle tables inside, barbecues, cookers & a couple of stereos which belted out flamenco rock type music all the time they were there. The kids ran wild & used the surrounding cars & caravans as ball stops for their games of tennis & football. As an earlier poster said it is their country & they are noisy, we will just ensure in future that we plan our trips to avoid Spanish public holidays .

With the amount of local and national holidays the Spanish have your stays will be very short !!

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As a further addition to my posting no12 it was quite an eye opener when one of the Spanish families left, the 1st shock was the time, 20:00pm, non of that be off by 12:00 malarkey for them, after hitching up the caravan they then decided after a noisy discussion that the near side ( Spanish ) tyre on the caravan was not quite roadworthy, the part next to the road being flat !!. One of the 'experts' on hand jumped in his car & shot towards the van at high speed scattering his friends & parked at an angle next to the wheel. An electric pump was produced & connected & the air began to flow, the men all stood staring knowledgeably at the inflating tyre while the women glared at the men & talked loudly, the kids just ran wild. After about 10 minutes it was decided that the tyre was now roadworthy so everyone kissed & hugged & the departing family jumped in their car to set off, that was when one of the more alert bystanders noticed that although the car lights were on, the caravan ones most certainly weren't, another round of manly arm waving & shouting produced a result, the caravan plug was dangling next to the road & needed to be connected to the car, triumphantly one of the group performed the task & was slapped on the back by the others his proud victory in front of the ladies only slightly spoiled by the fact that only the left hand side of the van was ablaze, the near side was completely in the dark, much like the hapless Spaniards who stood looking utterly deflated, rather like the earlier tyre. An even noisier debate on the electrical problem produced a result, one of the group tentatively approached the rear of the van & thumped the light unit with the base of his palm, it stubbornly remained dark, obviously he hadn't hit it hard enough so one of the others gave it a proper whack, still no result, I mentioned to my wife that maybe I should go over & try to get them to jiggle the plug but she wouldn't let me, probably thinking that my attempts to translate 'jiggle' into Spanish in front of the ladies might get me a thump instead of the hapless tailight.

After another 5 minutes of talking, gesticulating & thumping one of the more alert men in the group pointed at the tyre & it was decided that the outfit would depart for home . By this time it was approaching 21:00 so the remaining ladies started to cook the evening meal in the Gazebos whilst chattering at a decibel level that would drown out a squadron of Vucans, the men all noisily recounted their success at getting their friend off on his journey home & we resignedly sat with a bottle of Rioja & wondered what would have happened to a British caravanner out on the roads of Spain with an unroadworthy caravan, probably been OK unless it was 5cm over 12 metres without a pair of HGV plates on the back, or am I being cynical.

Edited by stevew1
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As a further addition to my posting no12 it was quite an eye opener when one of the Spanish families left, the 1st shock was the time, 20:00pm, non of that be off by 12:00 malarkey for them, after hitching up the caravan they then decided after a noisy discussion that the near side ( Spanish ) tyre on the caravan was not quite roadworthy, the part next to the road being flat !!. One of the 'experts' on hand jumped in his car & shot towards the van at high speed scattering his friends & parked at an angle next to the wheel. An electric pump was produced & connected & the air began to flow, the men all stood staring knowledgeably at the inflating tyre while the women glared at the men & talked loudly, the kids just ran wild. After about 10 minutes it was decided that the tyre was now roadworthy so everyone kissed & hugged & the departing family jumped in their car to set off, that was when one of the more alert bystanders noticed that although the car lights were on, the caravan ones most certainly weren't, another round of manly arm waving & shouting produced a result, the caravan plug was dangling next to the road & needed to be connected to the car, triumphantly one of the group performed the task & was slapped on the back by the others his proud victory in front of the ladies only slightly spoiled by the fact that only the left hand side of the van was ablaze, the near side was completely in the dark, much like the hapless Spaniards who stood looking utterly deflated, rather like the earlier tyre. An even noisier debate on the electrical problem produced a result, one of the group tentatively approached the rear of the van & thumped the light unit with the base of his palm, it stubbornly remained dark, obviously he hadn't hit it hard enough so one of the others gave it a proper whack, still no result, I mentioned to my wife that maybe I should go over & try to get them to jiggle the plug but she wouldn't let me, probably thinking that my attempts to translate 'jiggle' into Spanish in front of the ladies might get me a thump instead of the hapless tailight.

After another 5 minutes of talking, gesticulating & thumping one of the more alert men in the group pointed at the tyre & it was decided that the outfit would depart for home . By this time it was approaching 21:00 so the remaining ladies started to cook the evening meal in the Gazebos whilst chattering at a decibel level that would drown out a squadron of Vucans, the men all noisily recounted their success at getting their friend off on his journey home & we resignedly sat with a bottle of Rioja & wondered what would have happened to a British caravanner out on the roads of Spain with an unroadworthy caravan, probably been OK unless it was 5cm over 12 metres without a pair of HGV plates on the back, or am I being cynical.

I

 

Oh bless - it sounds about right! :)

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Yep,that's about it. ...plus the fact that the notion of personal space is entirely alien. People walking in the 1metre space between the side of the 'van and the wall. Children playing hide and seek around the 'van. Families stopping to look at us as we sit in the awning.

All good fun

,

Mind you,if you are having any kind of difficulty they will rush to help,as they did a couple of years ago when our motor mover packed up. A crowd of them gathered to help manouevre the van out of its pitch. Very kind.

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You do know that the Spanish live longer than almost any other breed, maybe we can learn something from them.

 

Haha you make them sound like puppies. I am sure that you meant 'any other RACE' ;)

 

H.

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We had 6 Spanish families next to us this year at Camping Almafra, they arrived on the Thursday of Easter weekend & left Monday, the 1st thing they did on arrival was to erect 6 gazebos tied together, with benches & trestle tables inside, barbecues, cookers & a couple of stereos which belted out flamenco rock type music all the time they were there. The kids ran wild & used the surrounding cars & caravans as ball stops for their games of tennis & football. As an earlier poster said it is their country & they are noisy, we will just ensure in future that we plan our trips to avoid Spanish public holidays .

 

We were at Almafra at Easter this year. Several pitches around us had two vans on, apparently ok to do according to one of the families. Noise, noise and in case we missed the conversation more it then got louder as the wine flowed.

 

In Spain I always make sure the Easter Week booked. I would hate trying to find a site over that perion.

 

Tom

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I suspect he meant neither.

 

Spanish, or Hispanic is generally regarded as an ethnicity and not race or breed.

 

They are still noisy though, that's a given.

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I was in Spain during March/April this year. Lovely and relaxed QUIET site at Zahora on west coast. Weekend prior to Easter Spanish families started to arrive and one pitched next to us. First off there was just parents plus couple of children in a very antiquated caravan. . Then up went large awning and then it must have been the grandparents & in-laws etc so there was now about 12 of them by evening on the Sat. They talked louder and louder over the top of one another until 1am on Sun morning and then took another hour saying goodnight :angry:

 

Next morning all quiet until 1030 then all turned up again for a re-run until 2000 when they all packed up and went again.

 

This was obviously a prelude to what to expect even worse over the Easter period so we upped sticks and moved to a nice Quiet CL site called Sheppards Rest run by a very nice English lady where we stayed until well clear of the Easter Spanish crowds. Just had to put up with Spanish Dogs barking all night and I had forgotten to pack the "ear plugs"!!

 

They just have no concept of toning down the noise when sharing space with others. I know it is their Country but obviously good manners go out the window on these free for all get togethers - so for me they can keep their country to themselves!

 

It certainly cured us of the thought of going to Spain with the caravan ever again. We got out of there asap and headed for a much more civilized southern France just over the boarder from Spain.

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