Jump to content

Electrics


Carly
 Share

Recommended Posts

Hiya. can anyone help me please. the camp I have paid to stay for 2016 season have said its 10 amp ehu. will I be able to use a kettle and other appliances. my kettle has a 15 amp plug ?.so it that to much. thanks Carly.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Your kettle will have a 13 amp plug. The biggest kettle generally is 3 kW so drawing about 12 amps. So you will need a lower powered kettle, say 2 kW or lower.

Or like us, use a whistling kettle on the gas stove :)

Graham

Unless otherwise stated all posts are my personal opinion 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Or, buy a kettle made for use in a caravan, usually 800/1000 watts. ;)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks wispMan I have a whistling kettle from my camping days. I will dig it out. cheers

Thanks gravon42 I will have a look on eBay. cheers.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

You need to determine exactly what mains electrical items you want to run, eg battery charger, fridge, tv, microwave, kettle, toaster etc, and identify what the wattage of each item is.

With a 10 amp EHU, you can only run a maximum of 2400watts at any one time.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks HP. its going to be my first touring caravan so have a lot to learn. thanks . Carly.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

You need to determine exactly what mains electrical items you want to run, eg battery charger, fridge, tv, microwave, kettle, toaster etc, and identify what the wattage of each item is.

With a 10 amp EHU, you can only run a maximum of 2400watts at any one time.

On some sites the voltage is below the nominal 230V. My friend checked his on a CCC site and it was barely 210V. He only checked it because his kettle wouldn't boil!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On some sites the voltage is below the nominal 230V. My friend checked his on a CCC site and it was barely 210V. He only checked it because his kettle wouldn't boil!

I have a volt and amp meter fitted in the van, and the voltage certainly can vary from site to site and also on site at different times.

However, when calculating what appliances can be used, it is prudent, in my view, to base it on the expected 240v.

How would you know otherwise without a meter?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Can I be a bit pedantic here and point out the national expected voltage in Britain is 230v now and has been for a while. aAs has been said don't go above 2. 4 kw for long periods or you will trip the ehu breaker. the Wattage is stated on all electrical appliances, Don't forget to include any 230v lighting you could be using at the same time.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

However, when calculating what appliances can be used, it is prudent, in my view, to base it on the expected 240v.

How would you know otherwise without a meter?

All appliances sold throught the EU, including the UK, are rated at 230v. Thus a 1000w kettle will have 1000w of power at 230v. If you actually get 240v, then the power will increase to 1089w and the curent wiil increase from 4. 35a to 4. 54a.

 

Brian

Link to comment
Share on other sites

This is all very helpful Zen and brianl. a lot to take in but getting there. thanks.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Can I be a bit pedantic here and point out the national expected voltage in Britain is 230v now and has been for a while. aAs has been said don't go above 2. 4 kw for long periods or you will trip the ehu breaker. the Wattage is stated on all electrical appliances, Don't forget to include any 230v lighting you could be using at the same time.

To be more pedantic, about 20 years ago the EU decided to harmonise the domestic voltage between the UK and continental Europe. The UK was on 240v and the continent on 220v. They came up with a voltage of 230v +10% -6% (i. e between 216. 2v and 253v). The reality is that little has changed in that the UK still operates in most places at 240v and the continent at 220v, both of which are within the tolerance range of the "harmonised" voltage. A typical EU compromise.

Appliances are rated to operate at 230v so will work on either UK or continental voltages.

Brian

Link to comment
Share on other sites

You need to determine exactly what mains electrical items you want to run, eg battery charger, fridge, tv, microwave, kettle, toaster etc, and identify what the wattage of each item is.

With a 10 amp EHU, you can only run a maximum of 2400watts at any one time.

 

 

 

As said + 750 w water heater if not on gas.

 

 

Dave

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Not forgetting that the start-up wattage of a microwave, and it's overall power consumption, is greater than the quoted power. So an 800w microwave would be using more like 1kw running and 1. 2kw on start-up.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

To try and keep it simple, 10A is plenty if you only use low wattage appliances and follow a simple one at a time rule.

 

You can use your charger and lights as much as you like but only one at a time out of:-

 

Low wattage kettle, less than 10000W

microwave, less than 950W

Water heater, less than 1000W

Space heater, less than 1000W

 

You can push these limits if you like, but the more you push the higher the chance of tripping out.

 

This will actually get you by on a 6A ehu, so on 10A you do have room to manouvre.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

"Low wattage kettle, less than 10000W"Bet one of those boils a kettle quckly!knarf

OOOOPS! I blame the virtual keyboard on my tablet! Should, of course, be 1000W.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Two things:

 

Don't forget the fridge in your sums - essentially constant 120W - and the TV, typically 30-75W.

 

More importantly check your caravan power rating - there is a breakdown in the handbook. Most caravans have two double pole MCB's with the fridge and SMPS fed from a 6A breaker, and everything else fed from a separate 10A. If the EHU has a blue plug in the UK then it should be fed from a 16A MCB; on the continent it could be 16/10/6/3A if a MCB, or 12/10/8/6/5/4/3A if it is a fuse. It is thus more likely in the UK that the on-board breaker will trip long before the post if you use a kettle of too high rating.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Quote" if the EHU has a blue plug in the UK then it should be fed from a 16A MCB"

A lot are only 10A,

knarf

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Quote" if the EHU has a blue plug in the UK then it should be fed from a 16A MCB"

A lot are only 10A,

knarf

16A is the smallest of the IEC 60309 range made.

That is their maximum rating, there's nothing to say that they can't be used for lower rated supplies.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Quote" if the EHU has a blue plug in the UK then it should be fed from a 16A MCB"

A lot are only 10A,

knarf

 

If it is not compliant with the rating then the post must be clearly marked such as anyone with a plug rated 16A would not unreasonably expect it to be able to supply that current.

 

I have yet to find one on the sites that I have stayed in the UK that is not protected by a 16A MCB.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks stevan. haha well spotted KNARF. Carly.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...