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Onboard Tank In Unicorns That Don't Have It?


lowedb
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Prompted by someone asking about onboard tanks, has made me ponder. Our Vigo doesn't have one. I worry if we go away in the proper winter, that the water pump and aquaroll might freeze up. With an onboard tank this shouldn't happen. So how sensible is it (please don't be rude) to think about adding one to a Vigo? Of course I would always drain it before travel, but I know the spare payload isn't great either.

 

Thoughts please.

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I remember a van I had in the past (think it was a Compass) that had a water pump connection in the shower, it was fitted with a blank but the idea was you could use it in the winter and thus stop your water freezing.

Maybe you could fit something simular, got to be easier than fitting a tank and an internal pump.

 

Rog.

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Small fish tank heater in the aquaroll would save a lot of expense.

I'd chop the plug off use a waterproof join and connect to a long enough run to make the external power point

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Hi, is it an S2 Vigo? If so, it's easy to fit an onboard tank. Have a look at this - www. tylerfamily. co. uk/Electronicvalves which will give you most of the info you need. If you need any further help just mesage me. The advantage of an onboard tank (apart from winter use) is that you can keep a small amount (10ltrs or so) in the tank so you've got running water when you're on your trip.

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Google. Water wizard caravan water. Capricorn systems do a set up we are looking at. A friend recommends it. Certainly looks the bees knees.

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Don't forget that if it's a U3Vigo (might be the same on earlier ones) you should be able to increase the payload by changing the weight label. I changed my UIII Cadiz from 1491 to 1550kg. Speak to your dealer or email Bailey Customer Services.

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You dont say which model you have - If a U3 you can fit the factory fit tank for the twins and do a bit of home plumbing. A heater under the aquaroll is very good but wont work 'off grid' of course.

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Hi, is it an S2 Vigo? If so, it's easy to fit an onboard tank. Have a look at this - www. tylerfamily. co. uk/Electronicvalves which will give you most of the info you need. If you need any further help just mesage me. The advantage of an onboard tank (apart from winter use) is that you can keep a small amount (10ltrs or so) in the tank so you've got running water when you're on your trip.

 

On my van and I think most, you need to add the water in the water heater unless you can close the inlet. I my case 10l in onboard would mean 23kg additional weight.

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Small fish tank heater in the aquaroll would save a lot of expense.

I'd chop the plug off use a waterproof join and connect to a long enough run to make the external power point

I did just that. It worked well!

 

I just took the lead through the kitchen area window. The window seal allows a lead to go through and have the window fully closed.

 

http://inspirebte. yuku. com/topic/531/Ice-Free-Water-Container#.VizDQELLL-s

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All the aquarium heaters I use are prone to cracking if powered up out of water, I wouldn't advise using 230 volt heaters, there not designed to be used like that.

 

As said study the twin axle caravans to see what the installation involves, a 40L tank is more useful than the 25L one I have a present.

 

There is a couple of threads about the subject from around 2011, but for U1.

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All the aquarium heaters I use are prone to cracking if powered up out of water, I wouldn't advise using 230 volt heaters, there not designed to be used like that. As said study the twin axle caravans to see what the installation involves, a 40L tank is more useful than the 25L one I have a present. There is a couple of threads about the subject from around 2011, but for U1.

They're not but you can now buy unbreakable ones that cut out if they are out of water a small 25w should lay in the bottom and would be enough to keep the frost off.

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Thanks for all the input. It's a U3 so I'd have to think about the pump arrangement of course as its currently in the aquaroll. I wouldn't travel with the onboard anything but dry, and unless I forget the heater is drained too.

 

The capricorn thing looks huge, but clever.

 

The U3 control panel actually has a level display but with no probe connected it does nothing apart from displaying Pr N C or something similar.

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I fitted one to a series 2 Barcelona. It's documented on here, search unicorn 2 tank it was around mid 2013

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Thanks for all the input. It's a U3 so I'd have to think about the pump arrangement of course as its currently in the aquaroll. I wouldn't travel with the onboard anything but dry, and unless I forget the heater is drained too.

 

The capricorn thing looks huge, but clever.

 

The U3 control panel actually has a level display but with no probe connected it does nothing apart from displaying Pr N C or something similar.

The twin axle U3's have an onboard tank which has a pump inside it (as well as the one in the Aquaroll). It might be possible to buy a U3 tank and fit that.

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Just where would you fit an onboard tank in a U3 Vigo. The front end of the Vigo is the same as the Cadiz. To me the only place would be under the front offside seat, next to the water heater etc. But the boiler and the hot water tank already take up a good 1/3 of the area. Is the 40ltr onboard tank not going to take up half of the rest? My SWMBO would prefer storage to onboard water too!

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Just where would you fit an onboard tank in a U3 Vigo. The front end of the Vigo is the same as the Cadiz. To me the only place would be under the front offside seat, next to the water heater etc. But the boiler and the hot water tank already take up a good 1/3 of the area. Is the 40ltr onboard tank not going to take up half of the rest? My SWMBO would prefer storage to onboard water too!

 

On the U3 TAs, it sits under the offside front seats, right at the front, alongside the drawers. There's a hatch that lifts out, with the tank sited underneath it. I'm not sure if the tank would fit through that hatch or if more radical surgery would be needed to get it in.

 

As others have said, there's plumbing to fill from an aquaroll, but what hasn't been mentioned is there's a screw-on inspection hatch (approx 6 inch diameter) that's handy for sticking a hose pipe in if you have the spare payload/noseweight and want to travel with e. g. 10 litres onboard from home.

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Just where would you fit an onboard tank in a U3 Vigo. The front end of the Vigo is the same as the Cadiz. To me the only place would be under the front offside seat, next to the water heater etc. But the boiler and the hot water tank already take up a good 1/3 of the area. Is the 40ltr onboard tank not going to take up half of the rest? My SWMBO would prefer storage to onboard water too!

 

Most onboards are under-slung so the only space you need is for the small 'inspection hatch'

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My senator one was fitted under the front chest, two screws to remove the chest gave full access to the tank, I missed the tank when we bought the U1 as the 25L didn't hold as much as the 40L, so we bought another aqua roll.

 

So fitting a 40L tank would save the weight and cost of another roll, or offset the two.

I don't winter caravan so I took the option of just having two rolls.

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I was thinking of the space under the offside seat, as we only use it for storing bags. The bed slats lift up though so I was expecting to be able to drop it in from the top. I haven't checked sizes or anything, was just thinking about whether in principle it could be made to work.

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To fit it under-slung sounds, to me, far more than a simple DIY job. More of a dealer-fit, which provides the sound of the old 'ker-ching' to me. I don't think I would relish the thought, even, of cutting the exterior wall to allow pump/pipe connections to be made. Would Bailey allow this sort of DIY? Might it even invalidate the warranty? From what I hear, all manufacturers seem to look all the time to claim that their warranty conditions have been broken by the customer.

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They're not but you can now buy unbreakable ones that cut out if they are out of water a small 25w should lay in the bottom and would be enough to keep the frost off.

My present heater must be 10 years old and I do have a spare so it will be sometime again before I buy one, both mine are glass.

 

It appears things on moved on. :)

Surly if it's under slung then it's outside so will freeze just as much as an Aqua roll.

 

Rog.

Underslung water tank is about as good an idea as the underslung blown air heaters.

Even if they are fully insulated what about the ground clearance, which probably means they are fitted near to the axle. ?

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My present heater must be 10 years old and I do have a spare so it will be sometime again before I buy one, both mine are glass.

 

It appears things on moved on. :)

 

Underslung water tank is about as good an idea as the underslung blown air heaters.

Even if they are fully insulated what about the ground clearance, which probably means they are fitted near to the axle. ?

 

 

Fully insulated and 4. 5" high - hardly a problem. Van in storage so can't measure tank (never had an on-board freeze) but fairly sure does not protude much if anything below chassis.

Both are very sensible ideas. Don't put people off unless your experience suggests otherwise.

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Fully insulated and 4. 5" high - hardly a problem. Van in storage so can't measure tank (never had an on-board freeze) but fairly sure does not protude much if anything below chassis.

Both are very sensible ideas. Don't put people off unless your experience suggests otherwise.

 

The problem with underslung insulated tanks is that when they do (finally) freeze the insulation means it takes them a good while to defrost too. It's for this reason that many/most motorhomes that have them are fitted with (proper) tank heaters.

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The problem with underslung insulated tanks is that when they do (finally) freeze the insulation means it takes them a good while to defrost too. It's for this reason that many/most motorhomes that have them are fitted with (proper) tank heaters.

 

Fair point thanks

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