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Building Cars Live


MillieDog
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Enjoyed the BBC2 live show from inside the Mini factory at Cowley. Cowley was the biggest employer in the area I was brought up in. Things were very different then.

 

90 minutes last night and another 90minutes today might be bit much, but the shots of robots welding body shells was awesome. As was the 'just in time' delivery of parts to the production line. And the quality control.

 

Worth taking a look if this is the sort of thing that interests you.

 

Puts caravan production into perspective.

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I watched it last night and thought it pretty good. Liked seeing James May back on the Beeb as well!

Tonight's is set to record!

2019 Bailey Platinum (640) Phoenix from Chipping Sodbury caravans, towed by our  2017 my Discovery Sport!

 

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I worked in the car industry for many years but never managed to get any factory visits but I watched this one and it was very interesting.

 

One car every 68 seconds is impressive.

 

Who said the British car industry was finished !

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I went to the Jaguar factory and saw all the robots etc. What amazed me was that the body shell went 1 way and the doors went another and then as the body arrived at the end of the line the doors came down on a a pulley to exactly join the right bodyshell with all the right colours and interior stuff ready to amalgamate into 1 car . All done by computers and bar codes. Left hand drive and right hand drive cars on the same line all the different engines and colours . None of this doing a run of 1 colour 1 day then another colour another day.

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Impressive. ..

 

geoff

Kia Sorento KX-1 CRDI 4WD towing an Elddis Affinity 530

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Hi all, I worked there a few years back in the reworks hall, that's where the faulty ones go to when things need tweaking and correcting, been round most of factory and its really good how things come together, enjoy programme

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Hi all, I worked there a few years back in the reworks hall, that's where the faulty ones go to when things need tweaking and correcting, been round most of factory and its really good how things come together, enjoy programme

 

I bet you were busy!! :D

 

Tried to watch the programme on laptop, but it kept stopping and starting! :angry: . ....gave up in the end!

 

Don't know how to cure it! (Honk?) ;)

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I went to the Jaguar factory and saw all the robots etc. What amazed me was that the body shell went 1 way and the doors went another and then as the body arrived at the end of the line the doors came down on a a pulley to exactly join the right bodyshell with all the right colours and interior stuff ready to amalgamate into 1 car . All done by computers and bar codes. Left hand drive and right hand drive cars on the same line all the different engines and colours . None of this doing a run of 1 colour 1 day then another colour another day.

The robots and "Just-in-Time" are modern but flexible scheduling was a feature at Vauxhall Luton in the 1960's where one line built all their models, left and right hand drive (big exporter in those days) and no colour batching.

 

It may be an urban myth but it was said at the time that a scheduling error lead to a Victor engine being fitted in the little Viva and when they realised it did actually fit, they put it into production as the Viva GT

 

I bet you were busy!! :D

 

Tried to watch the programme on laptop, but it kept stopping and starting! :angry: . ....gave up in the end!

 

Don't know how to cure it! (Honk?) ;)

The cure is a faster broadband connection and/or more powerful PC.

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I've got the fastest virgin going!! :ph34r: . .... :D

 

The robots and "Just-in-Time" are modern but flexible scheduling was a feature at Vauxhall Luton in the 1960's where one line built all their models, left and right hand drive (big exporter in those days) and no colour batching.

 

It may be an urban myth but it was said at the time that a scheduling error lead to a Victor engine being fitted in the little Viva and when they realised it did actually fit, they put it into production as the Viva GT


The cure is a faster broadband connection and/or more powerful PC.

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I laughed when James May messed up using the windy wrench to do the fasteners up on the tail gate, and then in the second sequence he messed it up again. What a girls blouse! It was quite a good program though, and I liked the way the production people contributed to the show.

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A lift company I worked for a few years ago had a contract with Honda at Swindon.

Made several visits there to service/repair lifts in various parts of the factory.

An amazing operation, from memory the CRV, Civic and possibly the Jazz were made there at that time.

The parts department is something else, receiving the just in time parts in from the manufacturers and the small land trains taking them out to the various stages of production.

The most fascinating place there though was the Research and Development department with lots of screens in place to stop prying eyes seeing what they were up to. Needless to say, working on the lifts gave us good access and was very surprising what you could see.

A brand new Range Rover being the highlight as well as other makes of cars.

All being carefully stripped down and various parts receiving scrutiny. Fascinating!

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I've got the fastest virgin going!! :ph34r: . .... :D

 

it also needs plenty of ram too. I can watch bbc iplayer on my tablet and it is pretty good without too much stopping and starting just using my 3 mobile mifi dongle. I also have virgin media app and watch programmes on that with the dongle as well. Its a Samsung tab 8 pro and I am quite impressed with it .

Edited by pagan8c
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The robots and "Just-in-Time" are modern but flexible scheduling was a feature at Vauxhall Luton in the 1960's where one line built all their models, left and right hand drive (big exporter in those days) and no colour batching.

 

It may be an urban myth but it was said at the time that a scheduling error lead to a Victor engine being fitted in the little Viva and when they realised it did actually fit, they put it into production as the Viva GT

 

The cure is a faster broadband connection and/or more powerful PC.

We were taught about kaizen (just in time thinking) in geography in the early 1990s. I remember a text book with Picture of a 1980s Ford escort as well. One of the first "world cars" apparently.

 

It stuck with me as I sort of run my life on the just in time principle, with varying success. I don't waste much time but do hate using public transport and consequently miss it sometimes.

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Really enjoyed the programme, spoilt only by that fool from top gear.

 

Actually reminded me of the Raymond Baxter top gear programmes where you could actually learn something. Recorded the other one too.

 

Also really enjoyed the series showing the farming industry. Those machines are amazing.

 

And how do they do it series.

 

Coming from a background where I worked in a melting shop developing Scarda screens for maintenance purposes and repairing as required, I would be really interested in the highly paid staff who repair the robots and PLC controlled equipment.

 

That could be a separate program on its own.

Edited by xtrailman
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We were taught about kaizen (just in time thinking) in geography in the early 1990s. I remember a text book with Picture of a 1980s Ford escort as well. One of the first "world cars" apparently.

It stuck with me as I sort of run my life on the just in time principle, with varying success. I don't waste much time but do hate using public transport and consequently miss it sometimes.

I came across kaizen in the 80's and early 90's when quality, and BS5750 (as it was then) was being used by by many businesses.

 

Very stressful, as shown in the first programme, when your engines come from Birmingham and you build your car's at Cowley, and the M40 is blocked.

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Really enjoyed the two programmes. Had no idea how much care went into the production. Could have done without all 3 of the presenters though, particularly May. He treated the programmes the same way as he did Top Gear. :(

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Seen it all when I worked at ford/Jaguar Halewood plant. in the early days we used to churn out 1200 cars a day with 15000 men working 2 shift. toward the end of the Escort we were building the same amount of cars with only 3500 men on 2 shift. by the time Jaguar took over with the X-type we only had 2000 men left.

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Guest KeefySher

W Edwards Deming was the father of modern manufacturing. Well worth researching him and learning where the world has got to since the second world war.

 

The Deming Principles underpin 'Lean', 'Six Sigma' and other methodologies; are often plagiarised as by McKinsey and countless other Management Consultants. The best bit about Deming is his straight forward approach to the failings of management :unsure:

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Really enjoyed the two programmes. Had no idea how much care went into the production. Could have done without all 3 of the presenters though, particularly May. He treated the programmes the same way as he did Top Gear. :(

Without their commentary would you have known what was going on? I don't think I would have AND I worked at Fords Dagenham many years ago. A lot has changed! :D

Edited by TedNewman
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The robots and "Just-in-Time" are modern but flexible scheduling was a feature at Vauxhall Luton in the 1960's where one line built all their models, left and right hand drive (big exporter in those days) and no colour batching.

 

It may be an urban myth but it was said at the time that a scheduling error lead to a Victor engine being fitted in the little Viva and when they realised it did actually fit, they put it into production as the Viva GT

 

 

 

The manager of Vauxhall AC block engine line at that time lives in my village so I'll ask him although Lutz may have something to add. .

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Seen it all when I worked at ford/Jaguar Halewood plant. in the early days we used to churn out 1200 cars a day with 15000 men working 2 shift. toward the end of the Escort we were building the same amount of cars with only 3500 men on 2 shift. by the time Jaguar took over with the X-type we only had 2000 men left.

 

 

The company the wife worked for used to buy Escorts in the mid 90s for 3300 when the showroom price was 14000 and Ford said they were still making a profit on the vehicle .

 

Her company used to keep them for 6 weeks and then sell them for 7000.

 

Dave

Edited by CommanderDave
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The company the wife worked for used to buy Escorts in the mid 90s for 3300 when the showroom price was 14000 and Ford said they were still making a profit on the vehicle .

 

Her company used to keep them for 6 weeks and then sell them for 7000.

 

Dave

I would not be surprise it was so cheap to build with robot. the body, the painting was all automatic. and around 30% of the assembly was done by robot.

Edited by Guest
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Enjoyed it immensely, just a pity with all the free publicity that they couldn't get "Their" car on time, and had to the take the first red one available, and leave Kate behind. In the 70s Murrey Walker was a guest of BL while walking down the line he commented on how efficient it all was, but then noticed the next car had disc brakes and drum brakes, on the same axle :rolleyes::rolleyes: things have changed. B) Nos

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The company the wife worked for used to buy Escorts in the mid 90s for 3300 when the showroom price was 14000 and Ford said they were still making a profit on the vehicle .

 

Her company used to keep them for 6 weeks and then sell them for 7000.

 

Dave

Even in the bad old days, the marginal cost of building a car was only about 30% of it's list price - the resr going in overheads. R&D, marketing, etc - with all the robots used, I'd expect the marginal cost to be even lower now.

 

Virtually all brands take advantage of this and offer "management " cars to employees where their hire fee covers tax and insurance - the cars are then sold as nearly new after 3-6 months and the car maker is still making a profit on his marginal costings

Edited by Black Grouse
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