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LongTimeCaravaner

Photos Of Children

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There was a group of children crabbing on Whitby harbour this morning and I got my camera out to take a photo of a crab which was making its escape when a teacher called up to me that I couldn't take a picture of the children as it wasn't allowed.

 

I wouldn't make a fuss in that sort of situation but just out of interest I wondered if anyone could stop me as it was a public place. I understand that they can stop people taking photos of children in a school play on school property etc but in a public place?

 

My friends commented that if I had walked twenty yards away and used my zoom lens she wouldn't have known what I was doing.

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Im not a policeman but I do use my camera out and about and I do believe that taking photographs in a public place is aloud. If no one wants to be in any photographs thay can always walk away. .... Saying that I also believe the police do have powers under the Terrorism Act to confiscate photographic equipment if the believe your taking photos for terrorism. ....Myself I would have told the teacher to call the police if he has any concerns of taking photographs . ..

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To take a photo of ANYONE, anywhere, you must get their permission first.

 

Taking photos of children has become a real NO-NO for a long time due to problems of paedophiles.

 

Even school plays are not allowed to be photographed, and most certainly photos of children in swimming pools is prohibited.

 

The Police can, and do, insist on any images are removed from digital cameras and if a film camera, seize the film.

Edited by Brecon

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To take a photo of ANYONE, anywhere, you must get their permission first.

 

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Journalists don't, or do they???

Edited by kiaboy

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Just as well that this state of affairs didn't exist when Frank Meadow Sutcliffe was taking photos in the very same location as in the OP.

 

Sad that the many innocent photographers suffer because of a few wrong 'uns.

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Posted Today, 07:04 PM

To take a photo of ANYONE, anywhere, you must get their permission first.

 

That is incorrect there is no law preventing it it is a civil matter breach of privacy etc.

knarf

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Posted Today, 07:04 PM

To take a photo of ANYONE, anywhere, you must get their permission first.

 

That is incorrect there is no law preventing it it is a civil matter breach of privacy etc.

knarf

 

 

That's what I thought

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Not sure of the legalities, but I wasn't even allowed to photograph my children at a school play.

 

Ridiculous :rolleyes::rolleyes:

 

 


 

Edited by jan69c

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Posted Today, 07:04 PM

To take a photo of ANYONE, anywhere, you must get their permission first.

 

That is incorrect there is no law preventing it it is a civil matter breach of privacy etc.

knarf

 

 

 

 

That's what I thought

 

+1 both correct there is no law against it in the UK and you don't need permission. Anyone who says there is should post a link to something proving it . .. which they won't be able to do.

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A friend of mine was stopped by a head teacher when photographing a view that included an old school. He said that it was only because of her age and that she was a woman that stopped him calling the police but that he would do so if she didn't stop.

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To take a photo of ANYONE, anywhere, you must get their permission first. Taking photos of children has become a real NO-NO for a long time due to problems of paedophiles. Even school plays are not allowed to be photographed, and most certainly photos of children in swimming pools is prohibited. The Police can, and do, insist on any images are removed from digital cameras and if a film camera, seize the film.

Not correct!

 

We allow the audience to take pictures of the school children in assemblies and other school productions, and there is nothing illegal about it! Photos also happen at sports days and other matches children are playing in! We have checked with the Coutny Council Legal team!

Check out our local paper that regularly posts pictures of children in class

The ban on photos is just people overreacting to the supposed fear of peadophiles!

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I am photographing a wedding soon. For a friend of a friend. Lots of children will be there, I doubt if anyone will mind ?

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To take a photo of ANYONE, anywhere, you must get their permission first. Taking photos of children has become a real NO-NO for a long time due to problems of paedophiles. Even school plays are not allowed to be photographed, and most certainly photos of children in swimming pools is prohibited. The Police can, and do, insist on any images are removed from digital cameras and if a film camera, seize the film.

How strange each year I go to my grand children's school concerts and take my camera, each year the head teacher asks that anyone taking pictures or videos does so either from the back it the sides. Photography at School plays and the like is not banned by law, it is just that a few misguided head teachers take the view that their children should not be photographed. We go to swimming galas with our grandchildren and photography is accepted, we go to gymnastic competitions with my 7 year old grand daughter and take videos of her competing, we go to gymnastic training and video the training sessions. Nobody bats an eyelid, everything is down to common sense, everyone there is a parent or grandparent and none of them break any law.

Taking photographs of people without their permission in a public place us not against the law, if it was then photography would be against the law. If a policeman seizes any item then a receipt must be given and the item must be returned to its owner in the same state as it was when it was seized, not to do so is a disciplinary event and could lead to dismissal.

What happened in the beach is PC gone mad. I would have suggested to the teacher that if he did not want his pupils being secondary items in my image that he should take his children elsewhere, and I am a retired teacher. He has no right to make such demands. A polite request might have received a different response.

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Under normal circumstances the police can't seize a camera or memory card unless you are committing an offence or suspected of terrorist activity.

knarf

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In China a couple of years ago there were some small children celebrating 100 years of being a Republic. ..all dressed up.

Their parents were delighted that people wanted to take pictures of them and posed them at their best. ....how different from here today.

 

geoff

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Snap away, you're OK! You are breaking no laws taking photographs in a public place.

 

If people don't want children in their care, or anyone else photographed when out and about, then they should stay indoors.

 

http://www. photographersrights. org. uk/page6/page6. html

 

If you wanted to take photos of your children / grandchildren when on a packed beach, you can't be expected to ask everyone's permission, or to ask them to leave the area while you snap away and nor should you.

 

Sometimes I think the world has gone mad!

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When I stayed at Wenlock I spent a day at the Victorian Town at Blists Hill. There were several school parties there and some of the children had dressed in a Victorian style. I started taking pictures of one group but no sooner had I focused when a young guy rushed up putting his hand in front of the camera saying, Can I ask you not to take pictures of the children. Fortunately I later found an older teacher who had no such objections.

post-261-0-57069500-1442948986_thumb.jpg

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To take a photo of ANYONE, anywhere, you must get their permission first.

 

Taking photos of children has become a real NO-NO for a long time due to problems of paedophiles.

 

Even school plays are not allowed to be photographed, and most certainly photos of children in swimming pools is prohibited.

 

The Police can, and do, insist on any images are removed from digital cameras and if a film camera, seize the film.

Wrong wrong wrong!!

 

There is no law to prevent the taking of images (still/video) in a public place. No permission from anyone is required. The police can't stop you and they have no rights to confiscate your equipment (except under terrorism laws, and then they will need an extremely good reason).

 

The police cannot force you to delete any images that you have taken.

 

I have hundreds of photos of kids from school plays, sports events etc and I have never asked for permission to take them.

 

 

Posted Today, 07:04 PM

To take a photo of ANYONE, anywhere, you must get their permission first.

 

That is incorrect there is no law preventing it it is a civil matter breach of privacy etc.

knarf

 

It is not a civil matter as no breach has taken place.

 

If you can see it in the public domain then you are free to photograph anything you want. As long as you are in the public place when taking it then no permission is needed nor any breach of any rights occurred.

 

One of the biggest issues with the CRB check (now called something equally silly) is that it only catches those who have already been caught!

 

H.

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Sometimes I think the world has gone mad!

 

Only sometimes?

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It is not a civil matter as no breach has taken place.

 

. As long as you are in the public place when taking it then no permission is needed nor any breach of any rights occurred.

 

Not exactly,it is as long as the person you are photographing is in a public place.

 

Quote from ask the police.

"The taking of photographs of an individual without their consent is a civil matter.

Taking a photo of a person where they can expect privacy (inside their home or garden) is likely to be a breach of privacy laws

If the photo could be seen as defamatory in some way then you would leave yourself open to civil proceedings."

Knarf

 

Edited by KNARF

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The most filmed and photographed nation on earth, ( cameras everywhere, streets, shops, public buildings, cyclists and cars festooned with them, buses, trains, taxis ) and we still have clowns like the teacher mentioned in the first paragraph around.

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Thanks for your views. Once on a beach I did ask a mum if I could photo her two daughters with their buckets and spades against the sun and it made a fab photo and I got her address when she said yes and sent her a copy. The subject matter on the harbour wasn't exciting enough to make me want to cause a fuss but I did wonder if I were in my rights if I had wanted to.

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No problem with filming or taking pictures at my littleuns junior school. The only thing they do ask is that they are not published on social media.

 

I did question this at the time but it's obvious once told. ..some kids have been moved to that school away from another area and there are some people who don't need to know where they are. ..

 

Common sense at the end of the day.

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No problem with filming or taking pictures at my littleuns junior school. The only thing they do ask is that they are not published on social media.

 

I did question this at the time but it's obvious once told. ..some kids have been moved to that school away from another area and there are some people who don't need to know where they are. ..

 

Common sense at the end of the day.

 

Yep same here and many other schools in our area.

 

I do wonder where all these schools that go over-the-top PC mad are based or if its (as usual) something blown up out of proportion and perspective by our wonderful media and social media (much like the UK refugee issue, Christmas festivities being "banned" etc etc) ?

 

I absolutely get the child protection issues and when sensibly applied these should only ever be supported IMO

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Was on a Site Nr Lizard many years ago when Wee Smeesh was toddler and witnessed the Warden evicting a single male in a MH from the Site after complaints of him filming kids in the centre field. Turned out the Warden was a X Copper my concern when I go Solo for a wee cycle break as you do get some strange looks from a minority on site. As you said Sunshine T thank you for that "Social Media ". .. :angry:

 

 

GAS . ..... :mellow:

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