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Steve W77

What Sealant?

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I have damaged the outer cover and cowl of the Truma Ultrastore water heater on my Sterling Eccles Moonstone. Can anyone tell me what sealant to use when I change the three pieces when I return home?

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You want a non setting mastic such as IDL99

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You want a non setting mastic such as IDL99

Thanks for the info, have ordered some on the net.

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I am in the process of replacing my grill/cover, thanks for this info :)

 

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Any alternatives to that?  I'd like to be able to pick some up from my local DiY/builders merchant, and they don't do that stuff.  Last time I did work with "Unibond Exterior Frame Sealant", but my shop has since replaced that with "Ever Build Caulk Once" which I am dubious about as the instructions Talk about using it for skirting boards and cupboards - ie interiors. 

 

What I do not want to use generally (but which forms the vast majority of my shop's stock) is silicone sealants, because silicone is very difficult to remove if you need to at a later time. I do use silicone, but sparingly, just in small fillets as a finishing touch.

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37 minutes ago, Bolingbroke said:

…  but my shop has since replaced that with "Ever Build Caulk Once" which I am dubious about as the instructions Talk about using it for skirting boards and cupboards - ie interiors.

 

Personally I'd only use something labelled 'caulk' inside the house, and even then not in bathroom or kitchen areas - I don't think they're meant to with stand much moisyure, even if gloss-painted over.

 

John

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Caulk once will be a decorating sealant filler that sets in a few minutes for inside use to fill  cracks/small gaps around walls/skirting/coving/door frames before painting. It is put on and quickly smoothed with a wet finger being a lot quicker than using polyfilla although if used under emulsion the paint may have a different shade once dry. It is unlikely to be suitable for outside use.

 

Acrylic sealants may be available at a diy store but might not last as long as silicone ones outside.

 

Sikaflex 512 might be the best one to use and a caravan dealer might sell it. It is polyurethane based and seems to be around £10 a tube.

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Soudall FixAll. Screwfix stock it in standard 290 ml tubes. I found a smaller, 80 ml,  squeezy tube of the same product in The Range, which might suit better if you only have a small job such as a heater cowl. 

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In the light of this thread, I have paid a visit to a different hardware shop and bought "Ever Build External Frame Sealant", said to "provide a long lasting, permanently flexible seal". Cost £2.something for a standard sealant gun tube. Says it should be over-painted for maximum durability (I guess to screen it from UV), but in my case the sealant will not be in places you could reach to paint.

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On 17/04/2019 at 12:18, Kevinuk1 said:

I am in the process of replacing my grill/cover, thanks for this info :)

 

Purchased the IDL99 did the job perfectly 👍🏼

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On 18/04/2019 at 15:38, Bolingbroke said:

In the light of this thread, I have paid a visit to a different hardware shop and bought "Ever Build External Frame Sealant", said to "provide a long lasting, permanently flexible seal". Cost £2.something for a standard sealant gun tube. Says it should be over-painted for maximum durability (I guess to screen it from UV), but in my case the sealant will not be in places you could reach to paint.

Does this mean it is not fully waterproof and will gradually break down if not painted over ? If so, whilst you may have saved a few pounds by not getting a better sealant or by not buying a suitable paint to cover your sealant, long term you may need to repeat the job. You might also find it is still no easier than silicone sealant to remove which was your original hope.

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8 hours ago, Paul1957 said:

Does this mean it is not fully waterproof and will gradually break down if not painted over ?

 

I doubt it relies on paint as waterproofing, as paint is not even particualrly effective at that, especially on something which might flex. My guess is that the paint is mentioned for its UV screening.  In my case, the sealant is in the trough provided for it in the back of one of those alloy extrusions screwed over a joint in the exterior skin. It never sees daylight. The extrusion itself has "rubber" lip seals along each edge. The old stuff that came out of the trough looked like this frame sealant too (but age hardened), and after I had dug most out the residue easily dissolved in white spirit on a rag..

 

Silicone sealant is a far bigger pain to remove.  I have never found any solvent that will dissolve it.  The only method I have found is using a modelling knife with a flat chisel-shaped blade moved very carefully along the surface; even that leaves a thin film of it unless you start scraping the parent surface away too.

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14 hours ago, Bolingbroke said:

 

I doubt it relies on paint as waterproofing, as paint is not even particualrly effective at that, especially on something which might flex. My guess is that the paint is mentioned for its UV screening.  In my case, the sealant is in the trough provided for it in the back of one of those alloy extrusions screwed over a joint in the exterior skin. It never sees daylight. The extrusion itself has "rubber" lip seals along each edge. The old stuff that came out of the trough looked like this frame sealant too (but age hardened), and after I had dug most out the residue easily dissolved in white spirit on a rag..

 

Silicone sealant is a far bigger pain to remove.  I have never found any solvent that will dissolve it.  The only method I have found is using a modelling knife with a flat chisel-shaped blade moved very carefully along the surface; even that leaves a thin film of it unless you start scraping the parent surface away too.

I agree, painting over some substance (e.g. epoxy) is usually for UV resistance

 

I've used a dedicated silicone sealant remover, which is a gel and has to be left a while to work, but does do a good job.  Linky

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12 hours ago, Guzzilazz said:

I've used a dedicated silicone sealant remover, which is a gel and has to be left a while to work, but does do a good job.  Linky

 

Thanks for the link, I shall give it a try.

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The stuff I got was Unibond, and with a plastic scraper worked very well

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