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Do disabled people have smaller hands etc???????

Nearly every site I have been on in the last 12 months has disabled toilets. Why, in all these toilets, do they have tiny wash hand basins compared to those in the main toilets??????

Are the disabled not allowed to have an ordinary wash??????

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So those in wheelchairs can actually get close enough to hand basin I think

My mind not only wanders, sometimes it leaves completely

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I have a friend in a wheelchair who qets quite upset with the phrase disabled toilet. He says that it is not the toilet which is disabled but the person using it hence it should be called a toilet for the disabled.

Honda CRV Diesel Petrol & No caravan now. :angry:

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Yes, I can understand why wash basins need to be low for wheel chair users, but why so small???

 

As in posts #2 and #3 . .. it's not only the height of the basin that's important, but the distance to the taps at the back of the basin . .. try sitting on a seat, then lift your feet off the ground, then lean forward as if reaching for a taps - you'd soon fall over if you were forced further back by a large basin.

 

John.

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Yes, I can understand why wash basins need to be low for wheel chair users, but why so small???

The larger the sink, the more difficult it is to reach the taps and, dependent upon where it is situated, the soap dispenser.

 

However, solving one problem often creates another, e. g. getting your clothing soaked by water splashing in a tiny sink is something most of us suffer from. :blink:

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I have a friend in a wheelchair who qets quite upset with the phrase disabled toilet. He says that it is not the toilet which is disabled but the person using it hence it should be called a toilet for the disabled.

Does he get angry with running shoes and bus shelters too?

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I have a friend in a wheelchair who qets quite upset with the phrase disabled toilet. He says that it is not the toilet which is disabled but the person using it hence it should be called a toilet for the disabled.

 

Does he get angry with running shoes and bus shelters too?

 

. .and lorries changing their wheels causing a tailback?

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Although not in a wheelchair I find the small basins low down a hindrance and difficult to use. However if that is what is needed for someone in a wheelchair, then I will put up with it as one day I might be in a wheel chair.

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If you don't like the sink in the disabled toilet (sorry I meant toilet for exclusive use of the those who are registered disabled) then simply use the sink in the normal toilet.

Caravanning. .. an expensive way to have a cheap holiday. ..

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I can't imagine what a disabled toilet would look like if was designed to meet the needs of all types of disabled people. The regulations demand a certain amount of manoeuvring space, and so they tend to have wide opening doors and smaller basins to provide greater manouvering space.

Ern

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As in posts #2 and #3 . .. it's not only the height of the basin that's important, but the distance to the taps at the back of the basin . .. try sitting on a seat, then lift your feet off the ground, then lean forward as if reaching for a taps - you'd soon fall over if you were forced further back by a large basin.

 

John.

Yes, but it's not written in stone that taps must be at rear of basin.

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TBH as someone who uses disabled facilities frequently, I am grateful that there are facilities for the disabled so not usre whyw e should moan about them. There are many countries where having a disablity is a stigma on your family and yourself and there are no disabled facilities or Blue Badge parking. Be grateful for what we have!

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If you don't like the sink in the disabled toilet (sorry I meant toilet for exclusive use of the those who are registered disabled) then simply use the sink in the normal toilet.

 

 

'Disabled toilets' are those suitably modified for use by people with restricted mobility but not, in general, exclusive to such people. Unfortunately, abuse of them in the UK led to local authorities fitting special locks for which keys are available to those requiring them.

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If you don't like the sink in the disabled toilet (sorry I meant toilet for exclusive use of the those who are registered disabled) then simply use the sink in the normal toilet.

No such register of people exists.

 

 

'Disabled toilets' are those suitably modified for use by people with restricted mobility but not, in general, exclusive to such people. Unfortunately, abuse of them in the UK led to local authorities fitting special locks for which keys are available to those requiring them.

RADAR 'accessible toilets' may be a nicer phrase?

http://www. bbc. co. uk/news/blogs-ouch-22602836

2012 Bailey Pegasus 2 Rimini towed by 2019 Ford Galaxy Titanium X, 2.0 EcoBlue, 8 speed auto.

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No such register of people exists.

 

 

RADAR 'accessible toilets' may be a nicer phrase?

http://www. bbc. co. uk/news/blogs-ouch-22602836

Mobility impairment comes in many forms, each with their own issues - state assistance is on several levels, from the issue of Blue Badge to a number of different disability benefits.

 

There are also some with temporary mobility impairment, eg broken leg, who get no state assistance other than health care but still may need to use disabled facilities.

 

A number of public facilities have the baby-changing unit and disabled toilet in the same space.

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No such register of people exists.

 

 

RADAR 'accessible toilets' may be a nicer phrase?

http://www. bbc. co. uk/news/blogs-ouch-22602836

Our local council has a register and they give you a little yellow card with your name and the name of your carer plus contact details.

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