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Towing Problems


watch dog
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I have a 2006 mark 2 Honda crv diesel. With 1500 tow limited, and

N/w of 100kg. I have fitted new rear spring, and doughnuts in the springs. I tow a 2014 Bailey Pegasus GT 65 Rimini 1475 kg with nose weight 61 to 100 kg. I get a pendulum effect. What is the best n/w near 100 or 61? Check tyres pressures van 60 psi rear car 32psi

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Welcome

Your van is very very close to your cars tow limit.

Graham

Unless otherwise stated all posts are my personal opinion 

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As near to 100kg as possible but check your overall loading that you do not have too much weight too far forward or rearward

My mind not only wanders, sometimes it leaves completely

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With my car I have tyre pressures at 32psi all round solo / light load, when towing / heavy load 35psi front, 44psi rear, check your car handbook.

Škoda Octavia Estate 2. 0TDi 4x4 towing a Compass Omega 482.

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We towed our Bailey Pageant Provence s7 1490kg at around 80 to 90kg nose weight, always towed absolutely perfectly, almost like it wasn't there with our 2005 Honda CRV 2. 2 CRDI. No modifications to suspension at all. Yes it is close to the limit for this car but it always seemed to tow really well. Perhaps the suspension modifications are causing the problem?

Kia Sorento GT Line

Bailey Unicorn Madrid 2016

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As near to 100kg as possible but check your overall loading that you do not have too much weight too far forward or rearward

 

+ 1

Honda CRV 2009 & Bailey Pageant Bordeaux S7, 2008

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I would go for 85kg to 95kg, same as I did with the Xtrails.

Although I never needed to add any suspension aids.

 

Mazda gets 80-88kg NW with no noticeable sag, and tows stable.

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Is there a limit stamped on the towbar? I try to keep it as close to that as possible

Paul B

. .......Mondeo Estate & Elddis Avanté 505 (Tobago)

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I tow my pegasus 534 which is about the same weight as yours with a 2005 Mk2 CRV diesel. Although the manufacturers towing limit is 1500kg the towing ratio is about 87% . I try and get the nose weight around 90-95kg. The awning is carried in the car in the passenger footwell as I like to keep the caravan as light as possible and the car load forward of the rear axle.

 

The CRV has proved to be a capable tow car and I have never had to consider any extra suspension aids. Just a thought but are the shock absorbers OK?

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Your problem may be the new spings, the caravan must not be even slightly nose up!

 

Nose up or nose down shouldn't make any difference so long as the noseweight is set correctly at the same height as when the caravan is hitched up to the car. The only reason why nose up is not recommended is because if the noseweight is set incorrectly with the caravan level, the noseweight will drop as the towball is raised (at least with a single axle caravan and especially so with a relatively short one) and one loses ground clearance at the back.

Edited by Lutz
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I had exactly that problem a few years ago, I fitted doughnuts in the rear springs to stop the car sagging when loaded up with kids, luggage and the van. All was well until our first outing without the kids and their luggage. This time the van became unstable at 50mph. I stopped in a layby and saw that the van was nose up, I moved the awning from directly over the van axle into the car boot. This fixed both the nose up attitude and the instability.

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Nose up or nose down shouldn't make any difference so long as the noseweight is set correctly at the same height as when the caravan is hitched up to the car. The only reason why nose up is not recommended is because if the noseweight is set incorrectly with the caravan level, the noseweight will drop as the towball is raised (at least with a single axle caravan and especially so with a relatively short one) and one loses ground clearance at the back.

So why specify a minimum and a maximum towball height.

 

Lunar state that it is important that the caravan is either level or slightly nose down but never nose up

Edited by Easy T

Alan

 

2005 Nissan X-trail 4WD diesel and Swift Charisma 540 2012 Lunar Clubman ES  2018 Lunar Clubman ES

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So why specify a minimum and a maximum towball height.

 

Lunar state that it is important that the caravan is either level or slightly nose down but never nose up

 

Maximum and minimum towball height are specified so that adequate clearance is maintained between the chassis and the road at the front and at the rear and t ensure that the trailer doesn't deviate too much from the level.

 

The probable reason why Lunar say one should not tow with the nose up is that it is quite common for people to set noseweight with the caravan standing level instead of at the actual towbal height when hitched up. To avoid possible instability issues if this is done they recommend going on the safe side and being level or slightly nose down.

 

The argument often brought forward that there is an aerodynamic issue if the caravan is nose up is a myth.

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I would love to see any evidence for the aerodynamic issue being a myth. Incidentally, I did not mention aerodynamics, just that nose up is bad idea, whether it is because of aerodynamics or weight shift is immaterial.

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Stevan, on 16 Oct 2014 - 07:11 AM, said:

I would love to see any evidence for the aerodynamic issue being a myth. Incidentally, I did not mention aerodynamics, just that nose up is bad idea, whether it is because of aerodynamics or weight shift is immaterial.

 

I believe the idea that nose up was a bad idea came from Bath University when the Caravan Club was sponsoring research into caravan stability.

Paul B

. .......Mondeo Estate & Elddis Avanté 505 (Tobago)

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I would love to see any evidence for the aerodynamic issue being a myth. Incidentally, I did not mention aerodynamics, just that nose up is bad idea, whether it is because of aerodynamics or weight shift is immaterial.

 

Caravans are not aerodynamic. They are big boxes on wheels that are aerodynamically bad regardless of their attitude relative to the direction of the airflow, especially at the relatively low speeds at which they are towed. If caravans were towed at the speed of an aircraft things might be a little different. Besides, the car up front creates such a disturbance of the airflow that even then things wouldn't be as simple as one might suppose.

Edited by Lutz
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