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Phil O

Total Disregard

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Turning a SA van on the spot, as suggested earlier, on wet grass can be the cause of two big holes.

 

Jockey wheels, particularly the basic small ones, can also do much damage.

 

IMHO (and experience).

 

John

Edited by JCloughie

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Yep, dangerous, deep ruts and small ruts can turn ankles, can trip up toddlers, to the clever ones I thought that would be obvious !!!

I must not be very clever. Though while I'm not condoning making ruts everywhere, I tend not to walk on the pretty bits and when walking or even fell running outside, I tend to look where i am going. Just how we simple folk operate.

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So, if your on a grass pitch, nice sunshine when you arrived, then the last couple of days of your stay it rains. the day you, leave, you have to be off by 12. 00. you dont have a mover, what do you do?

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So, if your on a grass pitch, nice sunshine when you arrived, then the last couple of days of your stay it rains. the day you, leave, you have to be off by 12. 00. you dont have a mover, what do you do?

james_may_crash.jpg

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So, if your on a grass pitch, nice sunshine when you arrived, then the last couple of days of your stay it rains. the day you, leave, you have to be off by 12. 00. you dont have a mover, what do you do?

I would first of all try to tow it off, being very careful not to spin the wheels. If there is any sign of a problem then I would go to the office and tell them, giving them the choice of towing me off with their tractor or tolerating any damage I might do.

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I would first of all try to tow it off, being very careful not to spin the wheels. If there is any sign of a problem then I would go to the office and tell them, giving them the choice of towing me off with their tractor or tolerating any damage I might do.

 

Bill, I think ex-trucker's point is that if it is damp enough for your car to make ruts, then it is definitely damp enough for the 'van (with it's higher axle loading, if it's a single) to make ruts too. The 'van's already on the grass so the ruts are going to happen regardless of whether it is removed by tow car, 4x4, mover, tractor or hand.

 

My solution in post #29 (or wait until summer) is about all you can do.

 

Edit: You could lift it out by hand. I remember this happening to our family Swift Corniche in the sand dunes near Arcachon, mid 1980s. Wasn't us but an army or Moroccan people who worked on the site. They would probably have left some deep foot prints if doing the same on a damp English field.

Edited by AlfaEuropa

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My point is simple, if I can avoid damaging the grass I will, but if after asking for assistance none is available I will get out no matter what. Mind you in 22 years I have never got to that point, if I have to go onto grass I check beforehand if it is wet, if I can walk on it with no problems with no sinking then I have always found that I can drive across it.

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Bill, I think ex-trucker's point is that if it is damp enough for your car to make ruts, then it is definitely damp enough for the 'van (with it's higher axle loading, if it's a single) to make ruts too. The 'van's already on the grass so the ruts are going to happen regardless of whether it is removed by tow car, 4x4, mover, tractor or hand.

 

My solution in post #29 (or wait until summer) is about all you can do.

 

Edit: You could lift it out by hand. I remember this happening to our family Swift Corniche in the sand dunes near Arcachon, mid 1980s. Wasn't us but an army or Moroccan people who worked on the site. They would probably have left some deep foot prints if doing the same on a damp English field.

Yes, but you won't spin the wheels (unless you've got a REALLY powerful mover fitted!) :P

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Yes, but you won't spin the wheels (unless you've got a REALLY powerful mover fitted!) :P

 

Agree, but no one's really mentioned spinning wheels as being the problem. Apparently the miscreants mentioned by the OP had AWD and didn't spin. They must have very heavy cars if they made deeper ruts than the 'vans though.

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The original post was making a point about people driving over the grass when there is no need for it, it was on the new bit at Southport CC site where the access roads are plenty wide enough to manoeuvre the caravan onto a hardstanding without the need drive across the grass. Some folk have a total disregard for the next people using the pitch, having to look at unsightly muddy ruts. Also the staff now have to repair the grass, not expensive but time consuming.

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Agree, but no one's really mentioned spinning wheels as being the problem. Apparently the miscreants mentioned by the OP had AWD and didn't spin. They must have very heavy cars if they made deeper ruts than the 'vans though.

We'd just had heavy rain over the previous 2 nights, they were using 4x4's from the Land Rover and Kia ranges. They didn't spin the wheels, the tyres sank in the soft ground.

. They would probably have left some deep foot prints if doing the same on a damp English field.

This had me chuckling for ages, nice one.

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We'd just had heavy rain over the previous 2 nights, they were using 4x4's from the Land Rover and Kia ranges. They didn't spin the wheels, the tyres sank in the soft ground.

I do agree with you Phil that it's annoying and thoughtless if people are doing this for no good reason.

 

Were the pitches hardstanding? Am assuming that they were other wise the vans would have also left ruts on the pitches themselves.

 

The sand dune incident with the Morocans bodily lifting the van out has gone down in family folklore

They had to give the old volvo a good hoik too

Edited by AlfaEuropa

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I still have a rollup towing strap in the car from the days when I didn't have a mover and I've had a mover for many years :rolleyes:

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I do agree with you Phil that it's annoying and thoughtless if people are doing this for no good reason.

Were the pitches hardstanding? Am assuming that they were other wise the vans would have also left ruts on the pitches themselves.

The sand dune incident with the Morocans bodily lifting the van out has gone down in family folklore

They had to give the old volvo a good hoik too

Yes they were hard standing pitches, white markers too so plenty of room to manoeuvre on and off.

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I am new to caravaning and this forum and I have read this with interest as I would like to try and do things correctly.

 

I have been given a 1992 compass vantage 510/5 and I am going to be towing it with a Lr discovery 2 auto.

 

The all up weight of the van can be 1200kg and 100kg nose weight with 175 wide tyres. The car whilst travelling is around the 2400kg through 255 wide tyres.

 

What would be best moving onto a grass pitch that may be damaged by the weight on the tyres?

 

1. Reverse on using the discovery which puts less weight per square inch than the van.

2. Buy a motor mover and have the 100kg through the narrow jockey wheel which may cause more damage than the tyres themselves.

3. Manoeuvre it by hand still with the weight through the jockey wheel.

4. Hiab or hot air balloon it into position.

5. Get site tractor to do it.

 

I know this isn't quiet how the thread started but seems a good place for a newbie to get the right advice and respect the camp site, pitches and fellow campers.

 

I am good at reversing, already had the discovery for towing my other trailer for work and got the caravan because the wife won't fly anymore.

 

Advice welcome.

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I am new to caravaning and this forum and I have read this with interest as I would like to try and do things correctly.

 

I have been given a 1992 compass vantage 510/5 and I am going to be towing it with a Lr discovery 2 auto.

 

The all up weight of the van can be 1200kg and 100kg nose weight with 175 wide tyres. The car whilst travelling is around the 2400kg through 255 wide tyres.

 

What would be best moving onto a grass pitch that may be damaged by the weight on the tyres?

 

 

2. Buy a motor mover and have the 100kg through the narrow jockey wheel which may cause more damage than the tyres themselves.

3. Manoeuvre it by hand still with the weight through the jockey wheel.

 

I know this isn't quiet how the thread started but seems a good place for a newbie to get the right advice and respect the camp site, pitches and fellow campers.

 

I am good at reversing, already had the discovery for towing my other trailer for work and got the caravan because the wife won't fly anymore.

 

Advice welcome.

 

 

Why do you need 100kg nose weight when manoeuvring the caravan by hand or mover?

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Why do you need 100kg nose weight when manoeuvring the caravan by hand or mover?

The 100kg nose weight is what is recommended in the compass owners handbook when running fully loaded for the 510/5.

 

Should I stop, unhook, unload the caravan before moving by hand or with mover?

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What would be best moving onto a grass pitch that may be damaged by the weight on the tyres?

 

I would suggest that there is no one correct answer to this, or the procedure to follow when driving on a potentially soft surface.

Other than what we give to our drivers which is to get out of the vehicle and walk the route(s) to ***** what is best in each particular circumstance

 

Some years ago the advice reduced our land damage bill in the patch I cover from a six figure sum to a three figure sum.

 

There does seem to be a mindset that believes that having a 4x4 means they can be automatically be driven anywhere, a mindset that is both untrue and causes needless damage unless a bit of thought and planning is used first

 

Or to put it more pointedly.

Of you want to drive a 4x4 that is your choice, but make sure you are fully conversant with off road driving techniques before straying off a tarmac or hard surface, because driving on them is a totally different concept!!

Edited by Ich
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Those talking about motor mover are usually talking about the type that fasten to the caravan wheels not the jockey wheel.

when you reverse you will notice any loss of traction and leave the caravan as it is, hopefully not carrying on and digging ruts.

 

When leaving the site, if you feel any loss of traction either use 4 wheel drive and drive out slowly or engage the motormover to get you to hard ground then drive out without damaging the pitch.

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What I consider is the correct thing to do is assess all possibilities when being shown the pitch. If I could I would use the discovery to reverse on, as in low range and an auto box with the td5 on tick over I have great control. If I would need final adjustments I wouldn't be afraid to ask for help moving it by hand.

 

I store the van on my land (10 acres next to salmon and trout river) and have found when moving it around by hand it is the jockey wheel that causes more damage than the main wheels, 70kg nose weight. So I use the discovery and don't have any problems with damage. Then again I do have around 20 years experience of driving all sorts of vehicles on and off road but try not to get too complacent as even the best can get caught out once in a while.

 

Thanks paulb and ich for your replies. I think respect of the site, pitch and other users is the main issue here but respect in all parts of our society is sadly lacking. On that happy note I'm off to see if I can get my head around the cassette loo.

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The 100kg nose weight is what is recommended in the compass owners handbook when running fully loaded for the 510/5.

 

Should I stop, unhook, unload the caravan before moving by hand or with mover?

 

If going to use mover, Yes, I would advise, stopping and unhooking . And to reduce nose weight just move a couple of items to the rear, it doesn't take long. And the nose weight recomendation is only 100kg if the tug or tow bar will take it.

Your tug will accept 100kg but I dont know what tow bar you use,So cannot comment on this

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A pneumatic jockey wheel is much better on soft grass ;)

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A pneumatic jockey wheel is much better on soft grass ;)

Is that so you can ruduce the psi to spread the weight? (Can't do the tongue in cheek face)

 

Nor can I do the multi quote as the tow bar I have is the land rover one that let's me tow 3. 5 tonnes.

 

Cheers all, off for a swift glass of red.

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