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jetA1

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Posts posted by jetA1


  1. 2 hours ago, Fireman Iain said:

     

     

    ...... OP suggests many advantages of a smaller caravan without really enlightening us as to what they are. And they aren’t obvious to me. .....

     

     ..... I genuinely don’t see what advantage a small caravan will offer us.....

     

     

     

    I think the linked promo video takes care of that, it is clear that this van is not really aimed at current caravanners downsizing, it is offering a different entry point for new caravanners. 

     

     

    • Like 1

  2. On 05/09/2019 at 15:59, AlanNancy said:

    So if I understand you correctly you are saying -don't check the price of anything just cough up! Or have I got that wrong?

    Alan

     

    Sorry to say you've got it wrong, see my last paragraph where I refer to 'shopping around'  and deciding what is or isn't acceptable, there's no right or wrong because we all have different values. 


  3. If there is a covenant on the property which bans caravan storage then there is no further discussion. 

     

    However, one thing about property ownership that is often forgotten is that it is not possible to "own a view", not surprisingly many people do not wish to recognise this. Discussions with neighbours about such matters may be difficult. 


  4. When I hear people bemoaning the price of something I often wonder how they deal with matters that affect their own income, wages, salary or other means of income. I'm guessing that most probably want to maximise their income to their own benefit yet they're content to comment adversely on others doing the same thing. 

     

    The phrase 'rip off' gets bandied around frequently.  However, when buying something that is providing an income stream to someone else. I find it amazing how incredibly well informed many people think they are about the financial position of other people they are dealing with. In relation to this thread does anyone 'really' know the exact financial details of the supply arrangements of gas supply arrangement to a CMC site? Is stock provided on account, is it all paid for up front, are there discount structures in place?  In my opinion the truth is it doesn't matter it is the wardens' business nobody else's.

     

    If I want to buy something about which I'm price sensitive then I'll ask the price and make a value judgment as to whether I'm willing to pay that price, or perhaps I'll  exercise my freedom of choice and shop around. Some purchases I make are price sensitive others are not, I'm sure we'll all have different views and values, which is to be expected. Ultimately one person's rip off may be another person's acceptable price of convenience.  

     

     

    • Like 5

  5. 12 hours ago, Danuk said:

     ...... It's home charging where the money is saved costing me only 2p per mile compared to 14p per mile for driving my petrol. 

     

    Having said that I don't believe it will be long before the government come up with some method to charge a higher rate of tax on electricity use for charging a car, they aren't stupid enough to lose all that fuel duty. .....

     

    It's not a question of the government being 'stupid enough' to lose fuel duty with regard to EV's, it is a simple financial reality. The amount of fuel duty currently being lost to EV's is small and is deemed to be acceptable on the basis of other perceived gains that arise from encouraging people to use EV's. But fuel duty is a significant source of income to the government (regardless of political persuasion)  and no government could deal with a significant loss of fuel duty revenue without there being dire consequences to public spending. 

     

    In the fullness of time it will be no less expensive (overall) to run and EV compered with an ICE car currently; government income from the various taxes and duties currently associated with running an ICE car will have to be maintained or we'll have to accept a significant change in public spending; or there will have to be an increase in the tax burden somewhere else to make up the income to government coffers. 


  6. 12 minutes ago, Durbanite said:

    Actually if you investigate deeper the knock on effects of every one switching to EVs is a very bad scenario.  Firstly the government loses a huge chuck of cash as tax and duty on fuel is probably one of the biggest tax incomes.  The government will need to find another way to reclaim those lost taxes. 

     

     

    And of course they will, the government is not going to sit on its hands and watch revenue provided by tax and duty on fossil fuels dwindle away and not find a way to replace it. Switching to EV's is a very good idea from the point of  tailpipe emissions and the early adopters are getting a good deal on tax breaks.  But further down the road the tax revenue collected for EV drivers will have to be the same as it currently is for ICE drivers. What the tax is called is irrelevant, the government needs the tax revenue and they will get it. 

    23 minutes ago, FrankBullet said:

     

    Be under no illusion the government purse will lose out

     

     

     

    Spot the missing word, possible meant to read  "government purse will NOT lose out" 


  7. 12 hours ago, Mr Plodd said:

    Why on earth would you want such a huge TV screen when away in your caravan?

     

    We have a small (14”  I think) TV/DVD player and a modest selection of DVD’s that fill in the very odd evening. Basically it gets very minimal use when away. We go out for walks, read books, listen to the radio, play board games/dominoes/cards  etc or, shock horror, actually Talk to each other! 

    Each to his own I suppose. 

     

    Andy

     

    I'm sure this is one of those subjects where there are as many opinions as people you ask, personally in 15 years of caravanning we never had a TV of any size in the van.  Evenings were always radio, reading with maybe some background music or back in the days of kids then board games as well. .

     

    But as you say each to his own.  


  8. 20 hours ago, Durbanite said:

    ... However if they accept your valuation as £500 and base their premium on that amount, then surely they are bound by their own contract to pay up to the £500?  ....

     

    I think you'll find that whatever you may say insurers will pay market price unless you have an agreed value policy, which is a whole different kettle of fish and would be completely inappropriate for such a car 

     

    Whether the car is worth £200 or £500 is immaterial,  in today's terms it is disposable, it's only worth maintaining until you are confronted with a repair that costs more than the car is worth. With the likely effect on future premiums I can't think of a reason why I would make a clam on such a car, so set the excess high, the only reason to have insurance is to cover third party. 

    • Like 1

  9. 12 minutes ago, Gordon said:

     

    I have to agree with you there, and to turn off the brake lights while an auto engine stop/start is in operation is probably a good idea but if adopted should be 'obligatory' not just 'permitted' .

     

    One of the strange features of stop/start is that while it used to enhance emissions performance and possibly reduce VED rates the systems are easily switched off by the driver, and from the sound of it many do.  This would introduce a variable into the effectiveness, or otherwise, of linking brake lights to stop/start technology. 

     

    Given the size of the vehicle population that doesn't have stop/start and the fact that we appear to be heading in an EV direction where stop/start simply wouldn't exist I'm not sure there is sufficient value in pursuing the idea of linking brakes light to stop/start. 


  10. 11 hours ago, CommanderDave said:

     

    I though the whole idea of the Tesla 3 was for the masses ?

    https://www.tesla.com/en_GB/model3

     

    Dave

     

    Indeed it is the idea that the Tesla 3 is more of a mass market car (still difficult to believe at north of £30k), however the  original comment was made in relation to a Tesla model X, which is far from a mass market car when a fully spec'd example will push £130k. 


  11. 7 minutes ago, FrankBullet said:

     

    Yes,  a few Dutch Tesla model X’s In France this year and it was at least 500 miles for them to drive to get to where we were.

     

    It can be done but range drops dramatically, if your within range of the Supercharger network it is doable, if you want to go off the beaten track ... not so sure. 

    1 minute ago, Grandpa Steve said:

     

    If they are not prepared to take the test then they don't want it bad enough!

     

    Exactly ... but that is a mindset that exists and it will impact the future of caravanning. 


  12. 4 minutes ago, Gordon said:

    The solution for individuals affected by this is simply to take and pass an appropriate trailer test - the problem may be persuading them to do this.

    You can book your car (B) and trailer (+E) driving test when you've got a full car driving licence. You don't need to pass another theory test. This test is sometimes called the B+E test.

    You can also take a C1+E test for a larger outfit if you hold a lorry (C1) licence.

    Additional tests will always have a financial element but it depends upon how serious you are about owning and using a larger caravan.

     

    In essence it isn't that difficult to obtain a B+E, however it is a hurdle to be overcome and and in the present climate busy lives and most people wanting everything yesterday it will act as a barrier. 


  13. 5 minutes ago, oldboy said:

    Peoples already using EV's for towing I have seen a few Tesla on site recently.

     

    Yes, I know that Tesla's can tow, but in the real world the Tesla is not typical of the type of EV that will become poplar with the masses. 


  14. 3 minutes ago, CommanderDave said:

     

     

    How this is all going to effect the industry in the next 20 years ?

     

     

     

    It seems there are several factors likely to influence the future of caravans and motorhomes ... the licence matter already mentioned, VED changes for motorhomes, the slow but inevitable move to EV's (there are two matters here range and the increased weight of EV's which will reduce MAM towing capacity) 

    • Like 1
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  15. 10 minutes ago, dtg said:

    Why would I want to pay more tax on fuel when my car's emissions are low enough to qualify for zero road tax, 

    Dave

     

    The regime under which you are paying VED was put in place to encourage lower levels of CO2, which at the time was 'thought' to be the best thing to do for environmental reasons. Science has since shown that a flawed logic was used to make that policy and that there are other concerns.

     

    However it's highly unlikely that any future changes would be retrospective and the chances of any government having the 'bottle' to increase the price of road fuel by putting VED on it are almost non existent. 


  16. 12 hours ago, Bolingbroke said:

    What holds me back is the cost of an EV, its range (charging points or not), its safety (see picture in my post above), and how the battery will last longer term. I shall wait and see. The hype, smugness and evangelising of EV advocacy is also an off-putting factor I must admit; a matter of fact approach would be far better.

     

    For me the safety aspect and how long batteries will last are not red line issues, however I totally agree about the evangelistic approach of some RV supporters which is getting right up my nose. 

     

    The use of ICE, petrol and diesel for motor vehicles , has been absolutely pivotel to how the world has developed and where we are today after nearly 125 years of development.  If we are now in a different place and believe that there have to be alternative fuels for our motor vehicles then so be it.  However to decry and demoise ICE, petrol and diesel as fuel sources seems highly disingenuous to our past, we are where we are ONLY  because of everything that has gone before; this has been a virtual 100% commitment to fossil fuels.   We can't just write off that part of history, it is what makes us who/what we are. 

     

    There are number of EV evangelists (such as Robert Llewellyn on Fully Charged)  who are highly supportive of EV's but they go beyond support for new technologies and demonise fossil fuels at ever single opportunity.  In my book that is not the way to go about getting support for alternative energy sources for the future. 

     

    As already mentioned in another thread the UK's development of EV charging infrastructure is simply appalling, the government, who should be leading the move to EV's, have simply ducked their reponsibility. Local government finances are up the creek without a paddle so there is no way we can expect to see any sort of proactive consistent approach from that direction. To their credit Tesla have invested in a charging infrastructure for their vehicles which puts all other attempts to provide for EV's to shame. 

     

    At this moment it is very difficult to justify EV's on purely financial grounds, thankfully there are many people who are willing to give this new technology "a punt" even if it costs them. However we are  long way off EV being a financially viable option for the vast majority of the population. Sure there is a fuel cost advantage at the moment but but the saving is a long way short of providing  financial justification for buying into EV's. 

     

    In our family Mrs JatA1's car usage is perfect for it to be substituted by EV in preference to ICE. However, strictly from a financial point of view, an EV would be an extravagance. Currently with a capital cost of £2500 and an annual mileage of 3,500 miles she doesn't use enough fossil fuel for there to be a significant financial saving.  I'd like to give EV a go but haven't got the spare cash to enable it. Robert Llewellyn (et al) can scream at me until they are blu in the face but unless he is willing to subsidise me then there is no financial justification for an EV.  If he is sufficently well off that he can take a financial hit on his motoring finances in order to follow his EV dreams then good on him  .... but he is wrong to demonise the rest of us because we are not as well of as he is and able to indulge our environmental fantasies. 

    • Like 3
    • Confused 2

  17. 9 hours ago, Leedslad said:

     

     

    Quoting from the press release ...

     

    DVLA Strategy, Policy & Communications Director Lynette Rose said:

    It’s important that all motorists know what their driving licence allows them to drive and if they’re entitled to tow.

     

    Surely that should read 'what' they are entitled to tow, there are reduced weight limits in play since 1997 but I don't recall a withdrawal of all towing rights which is inferred by saying 'if they are entitled to tow'.

     

    It would be nice to think that if the DVLA are going to publish comments they would at least get it 100% correct.  :unsure:


  18. For the cost involved and the peace of mind it gives I'd always take insurance. Heaven forbid but if something serious happens and a medical repatriation is required the cost can escalate very quickly. (I have a friend who is nurse, his job is to accompany medical repatriation flights, the care is excellent but costs are high)  There is plenty of choice available and very easily accessible online. If appropriate don't forget to declare pre existing conditions.

     

    I've taken out around 25 single trip policies in the last 3-4 years and used a company called Southdown, but as I say there is plenty of choice. 


  19. 4 hours ago, micktheshed said:

    Thanks 'jetA1';  Took your advice & 'phoned them again, (only 20 mins. wait this time, but if you hang on long enough surprisingly they have a free call-back system-brilliant!)

    Turns out I need to take out a new 'recovery+personal' cover policy for my Terrano (Dec2003) @ £63 & for my Astra (Jan 2003) @ £67, which seems very reasonable.  My daughter's car will need it's own policy @ about £118. Don't understand the costs as they were all covered under her car's policy @ £118 originally. But at least my cars will be covered (@ a yearly increasing cost no doubt!) until they are 99YO!!!!!!! I've only managed 27 years in the past so I don't see this being a potential problem LOL.

     

    That's great news, it seems your post has helped us both, you get continued cover and I've discovered that I can get my classic covered on the same policy. I'm very pleased with how Grenflag dealt with my call, I'm guessing you are too!


  20. 52 minutes ago, micktheshed said:

    I've been with green flag for many years now & they have always been very good. However, now my present car  is now 15 1/2 years old it is no longer covered (despite the fact it's only ever had one minor breakdown, unlike some newer cars I've had!). I don't really want to change but my hand is being forced!

    Does anyone have any suggestions re other companies (caravan must be inc. also).

    BTW: I'm a C& C C member.

     

    I took an interest in this post because I've just signed up with Green Flag, we have personal cover for two of us. I was concerned that one of our vehicles would fall out of cover because of age just after 1st renewal.  However, having spoken to Green Flag apparently our older car (just coming up to 15 years) is named on the policy and as such it can continue to be covered until it is 99 years old!  Our other car has a another 5 years to go, I can even add my 38 year old classic to the policy (at a cost obviously) I'm just checking other options for classic breakdown coverage. 

     

    I'd suggest calling them before assuming that your hand is being forced, if my experience is anything to go by it sounds as though they may have options.   

    • Like 1

  21. Euro's are a bit like some of the furniture outlets, they are in a state of never ending sale! As soon as 'mid50' ends then low and behold 'summer55' begins ... :lol:

     

    I find that list prices and % discounts need to be taken with a large pinch of salt, what matters at the end of the day is how you value the actual price to be paid. There's no doubt that Euro's do offer some good 'net' prices when the discount codes are applied and with 200+ branches there's a good chance there is one within a reasonable distance to visit.

     

     


  22. 2 hours ago, Trucker60 said:

       

     

    Had new discs &pads fitted today 2013 ford Mondeo apparently its common on modern cars garage don't give a reason 

     

    I have part time job delivering for a motor factor, I deliver to all types of businesses from one man mobile mechanics through to franchise dealers and all manner of businesses in between. I'd say more than 50% of brake pads are supplied with new discs. 

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