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Steamdrivenandy

CMT Moderator
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About Steamdrivenandy

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    N. Staffs looking over Cheshire in awe and wonder
  • Interests
    Steam (GWR King 6024)
    Eribas
    Garden Design
  • Make & Model of Towcar / Toad
    N/A
  • Caravan / Motorhome / Static (Make and model)
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  • Year of manufacture (Caravan / Motorhome / Static)
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  1. Except how could any caravan maker ramp up production when subject to lockdown and even if they could've got exemption, could all their suppliers increase activity in order to hike their consignments to match the caravan makers aspirations? It was always going to be a classic case of massive demand and little supply, leading to shortages and higher prices and we're seeing the same thing in virtually everything now. There will be a big bubble of inflation and the worse off in society are the people who will be hit worst. I cannot believe that the people of the UK are letting it happen.
  2. Plenty of people complaining they can't get towbars fitted to their cars months.
  3. Far from expanding capacity UK caravan makers have reduced their production due to a mish mash of issues - covid, pinging, staffing, transport, part availability, appliance availability, Brexit etc. They haven't been able to recoup production lost during lockdown and most dealers have sold through their 2022MY allocations already. Customers clamouring for vans as they've saved costs due to lockdown and want self contained holidays in vans but the markets can't supply them. Most of the same issues are affecting Continental makers too. Reduced new sales means reduced part exchange stock and reduced used sales too. So a caravan salesman has much reduced potential for target busting bonusses and has to watch potential good sales opportunities walk out the door.
  4. When mine played up I replaced all the little rubber flaps/grommets etc that are in the service pack and it made no difference. I then replaced the whole socket and all worked fine. I have no idea where the bit of the 'spider' went and when it broke off but somehow its absence made the thing stop working.
  5. I had a similar problem and messed about for ages trying to sort it. Eventually I replaced the socket on the outside/inside of the van and the problem disappeared. Close inspection of the removed socket showed a tiny piece of a plastic moulding, just inside where the hose attaches, had broken and this appeared to cause the problem. If you look at this link https://bigwhitebox.co.uk/product/whale-inlet-socket-with-integrated-pressure-switch/, the enlarged pic of the socket shows part of the bit I refer to just inside the inlet. Just a small piece of what I can only describe as a 'spider' moulding had broken off, but it was enough.
  6. I seriously doubt that any caravan manufacturer, or even set of manufacturers have the sort of money required to do serious worthwhile research into the issue. The car industry can afford such things but the caravan industry is minuscule by comparison. The minimum payload formula was meant to help caravanners and stop over zealous marketing people claiming ridiculously low payloads as a means of gaining sales. Time and manufacturer's gaming the system hasn't been kind to it, but the NCC haven't done themselves any favours by not reviewing the formula to keep up with modern usage. How much of that is NCC stick in the mud and how much the strategic obstruction by one or more manufacturer we have no way of knowing. Of course each manufacturer has freedom to provide more payload than the minimum, but none do, which demonstrates how much they believe low payloads aren't an issue for their customers.
  7. The 'clubs' keep on being blamed for the 'promoting' or 'perpetuating' the 85% recommendation, but it should be remembered that it is an industry recommendation and they are following the guidance published by the industry trade body the NCC. I suspect the 'clubs' wouldn't want to be seen to be openly promoting a different set of guidelines to those that the caravan makers themselves actually support. If change is necessary in that regard then it's for the NCC to publish it.
  8. We're in danger of talking at cross purposes here. The flush tank drain pipe has no connection to the pump and relies on gravity to drain the flush tank. So blowing down it wouldn't affect pump performance. The logical thing to do is test whether 12V is reaching the pump. If it is then the pump is faulty in some way, if it isn't then it's a fault in 12v supply. It could be a PCB issue, a fuse, or corrosion on electrical contacts. You can check whether 12V is reaching the PCB and whether it's reaching the fuseholder etc.
  9. The OP originally posted on Thursday evening, appeared to log in for a look on Friday morning, but hasn't clarified if he's talking about the caravan's published empty noseweight ot its noseweight limit.
  10. To avoid any misunderstanding, some caravan makers used to advertise/promote their vans by stating a noseweight which would've been the actual noseweight of the van, probably in MIRO state or possibly when totally empty. The problem with that was it wasn't consistent in any way at all, with large variations between identical models and, of course it altered as soon as anything was loaded on board. In reality, unless your particular example was lucky enough to have an identical noseweight to the brochure and you towed the van empty a great deal of the time, the information was relatively useless. So actual noseweights gradually disappeared from most manufacturer's brochures. What you do see these days is the noseweight limit, which is the maximum weight that should be put through the hitch. As others have said though the maximum for any rig is the lowest limit that the car maker and caravan manufacturer set and often it's the car limits that are operable not the caravan's.
  11. Might still be worth checking. It could've ingested a lump of pink gunge that stopped it mid stream.
  12. Make the van dark and switch on the lights. Then press the flush button. If the light's dim momentarily then the pump has stuck. Remove pump from cistern tank, twizzle (technical term) the pump spindle and it should zzzizzzz away happily. Pumps often stick after long periods of inactivity/dryness.
  13. If you're wanting to change the car anyway, then the world is your turbot. But if you'd rather not then you firstly need to know the manufacturer's towing limit and recognise that whilst it's not a legal limit, the car maker knows a thing or two, so it's best the caravan is within that limit. Be aware that demand for caravans has been extremely high for the last 18 months and new supply restricted by covid. This has meant that 2022 Model Year dealer allocations of new caravans is quickly selling out and dealer stocks of used vans are very slim. This has led to large used van price rises and the vans that are left are often left for a reason. It may be poor condition, unpopular layout or just way too highly priced.
  14. I agree that it's not worth worrying about, but then why do people constantly refer to it on here and try to wangle as much kerbweight as they can, rather than just shrugging and accepting what's published and move on.
  15. I bought a 2018 Karoq from a Skoda dealer in June for £18,427. Autotrader is suggesting I advertise it as a private sale at £20,510. Dealers are asking £22,500 to £24,000 for same model, same age, similar mileage on A/T.
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