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JTQ

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About JTQ

  • Rank
    Senior Member with over 5000 posts
  • Birthday 17/02/1943

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Hampshire
  • Interests
    Engineering, computing, outdoor life. cycling and walking
  • Towcar
    Disco4
  • Caravan
    Hymer

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  1. Quoting the notification, "(the Executive Committee). They are elected from amongst you and volunteer to be your board of directors. (They receive no pay for their tireless hard work). " "No pay", not too great a wage bill there then?
  2. "It is vital to remember that the Club is a true members’ Club that is owned by you, the members and run by members (the Executive Committee). " Whilst we will give our support paying the subs, as we have for close on 40 years, it is was these few words early on where we thought, now he has lost the members trust by writing that. I might have agreed 30 years back and accept a lot of effort is put in by volunteers, but still a true members club, I feel not.
  3. I don't know the van and so the equipment fitted alarm etc, but whatever there will be drains on the battery in addition to the inherent drains within the battery, so charge dissipates. That you got the "alarm" clearly indicates the system monitoring the battery is one source, sapping its energy. The mains charger and the solar charger if the latter is connected to the battery, also continuously sap power. The solar yield in winter, the more so from a roof mounted panel not stood up facing the sun is "dreadful", way worse than the sun high in the sky as in summer, plus in storage the panel might get dirty, or a wet leaf on it when what little it can yield drops even further. Put bluntly, it is being hopeful a solar panel, in a van with a monitoring system can adequately cope through the winter, much less so on sites where the long winter shadows cast from trees traverse the panel. That it sorts itself out now as we enter the summer and as lately the excellent weather, suggests the system is all right, just the expectation from it in winter were too high. JTQ
  4. No, leave that to recharge the battery
  5. Whilst that wish is understandable, it must be remembered that even that 110 ah lead acid battery if in prime health can realistically only give you the equivalent of 0.66 of an Electrical Unit [ 0.66kwh]. And if taken for powering a high demand device like a microwave its life will be a very short one. Your original TV requirement is viable, we did that for more than a decade, albeit using a lower powered TV. Only one of my two inverters worked with that SONY TV. The more expensive of the two, both are 150 Watt units.
  6. Good, I hope that will also be the case with our car.
  7. These very short journeys will play havoc with getting a decent regeneration of our DPFs, with all the ramifications that follow. Living in the sticks makes using the car essential, unless somebody else uses theirs for the medicines and vital food stuff. So far, somebody has or I have cycled the 7 miles for the pills, but should they fall for this virus I can't see an option but use the car and as needed do a longer regeneration run. I wonder how that will be received if stopped? "Necessary" to have a car & "necessary" to keep it running.
  8. Whilst clearly a quality bike track pump, just as the requested "cordless" is not at all suitable for starting with a totally flat caravan tyre, it is making a clearly uninformed mistake to dismiss the track pump as unsuitable for topping up the few psi a caravan tyre is likely to need, or for the car prior for towing. With an ability to reach 160 psi and a higher flow rate than any non industrial cordless inflator they are very suitable indeed for the 65 psi met with some caravans, or the 80 psi with some motorhomes. Track pumps designed for HP [160 psi] bike tyres being in our application far more suitable than car foot pumps more typically designed for 40 odd psi cars. The suggestion was made very seriously, as a viable and cordless means of dealing with inflating these challenging tyres we have fitted to our caravans and MHs.
  9. Or better still for the higher pressures often found with caravans and motorhome, a quality "track pump", https://www.halfords.com/cycling/bike-maintenance/bike-pumps/topeak-joe-blow-sport-iii-545399.html
  10. Hymer Nova caravans have a full height aluminium front bulkhead albeit with an ABS, lower front apron forming a gas locker. They also have a full rear end aluminium bulkhead. IMO they are amongst the best for your specific needs, together with being amongst the best structurally built vans. They are initially very dear, but second hand because generally considered a limited niche product, not mainstream, the price drops disproportionately low.
  11. Some will for thermal reasons be fitted with light shielding window blinds featuring aluminium foil.
  12. Early Alu-Techs were aluminium skinned, more recent whilst retaining the Al-Tech extruded aluminium structural members, are skinned with GRP [glass reinforced plastic]. However, your quest to shield celluar signals by seeking an aluminium skinned caravan is fundamentally flawed, they have lots of windows, made in acrylic, where the signals will stream through.
  13. Excellent service yesterday from local, 6 miles away VW dealership, using their CV procedure. Vehicle collection; chap knocks door and stands way back, intro chat and asks for key to be placed on doorstep and then to move away. He picks up key bids me farewell opens car and starts film wrapping steering wheel and gear stick, before driving off. Delivery; phone call to say MOT & service all done and takes card payment over phone, enquires if delivery is okay in next hour. States, they will on delivery leave all documents in locked car, seal that key in envelope and put through letter box, ring bell so we know car is back. Thought, they have worked this one out well. Just shows somebody has been thinking about minimising my risks, and for those in critical at risk group a CV duration free service. I will leave all alone for 72 hours, as I don't need it and time for any nasties hopefully to be dead by then.
  14. IMO, in something like this we need any help we can get from anyone. Prejudice, probably being the least thing we should be practicing, something thank goodness realised by the scientists pooling their efforts for mankind.
  15. There used to be a statement "that most accidents happen at home", makes you wonder if here the "exposure to an accident" claim is a poorly considered argument? Better ban gardening, anything DIY etc, these seem higher risk accident zones. Just a thought.
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