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hawkaye

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About hawkaye

  • Rank
    "A safe pair of trousers"
  • Birthday 28/09/1952

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    near Richmond, North Yorkshire
  • Interests
    Caravanning, family, swimming, motorcycling, cycling.
  • Towcar
    2004 Citroen C8 SX 130 6-speed
  • Caravan
    2000 Lunar LX 2000 524

Recent Profile Visitors

2,386 profile views
  1. We travel withour Heki window in the locked 'ventilation' position. I find it stirs the air up enough to stop the caravan feeling like a blast furnace when we stop after travelling in the French sunshine. Never lost it yet in 19 years and thousands of miles of ownership. It's the same 2 catches that hold it cracked open as hold it fully shut, so why would it take off?
  2. Are your caravan's road wheels balanced? If they aren't that may be the cause of loose screws.
  3. It may provide power to the control panel and fridge light but it's unlikely to power the fridge cooling system unless wired up incorrectly. The 12v supply may make the fridge switch over to gas automatically in such a way that the owner is unaware of what is making the fridge cold. To answer the question; no, my fridge doesn't run off the leisure battery.
  4. If people have legitimate concerns about the OP's safety then they should raise those concerns in whatever manner they elect to. Personally, I didn't detect any sarcasm or rudeness from this 7-year-old thread.
  5. Well done! This will be help to someone in the future.
  6. My Citroen C8 makes sure the climate runs all the time. If it gets turned off the computer will turn it back on, smirking as it does so. It's been set at 20°C for years, all vents open. It's also equipped with a Webasto cooling system heater to make sure heat is available to the whole interior within a mile of driving off. It's been checked twice in its 14 year life, both times satisfactory.
  7. Since 1989 I'm on my second Al-Ko wheel carrier and quite happy with both of them. Fortunately I've never had to use it in an emergency but I'm certain about how it would work at the roadside. The carrier gets used every year for spare wheel pressure check and lubrication of the tubes. When I was browsing the internet years ago, intrigued by the vitriol that some folk had to post about the device, I found someone who had drilled his caravan floor so he could check the tyre pressure without removing the carrier. That's self-defeating and asking for the tubes to sieze up through lack of use. The attached chart shows 4 models of carrier and 6 measurements of receiver hole in the chassis to measure before you match those measurements with the tyre size of the van. Then, you buy the appropriate model of carrier. Within the caravan (new and second-hand) trade It seems to me there's plenty of scope for getting a mismatch between tyre size, and chassis dimensions leading to potential difficulties removing and replacing the carrier. Are you absolutely sure the carrier you are condemning is undamaged and the right size for your caravan chassis and its tyres? Finally. Yes, really. My tyre fitter and I consider the marks on the tyre wall that are characteristic of an Al-Ko-mounted spare wheel to be trivial. Tyres deflect much more than those little furrows in normal use. The tyre sidewall will start to regain its shape with use and heat build-up, much like flat spots from standing sort themselves out. If you ever stand around in a car park while your other half is in e.g. a clothes shop and watch as folk kerb their tyres, you will see the punishment a tyre can take and still be serviceable. Any tyre fitter who disagrees is probably biassed in favour of a new tyre sale. sparewheelcarrier2005.pdf
  8. I had that issue when I left the caravan for the in-laws for a year while they renovated a French farmhouse a while back. Deposits inside and a gritty feel to the blade opener. New seals and pressure vent and since then I'm draining the citric acid solution I use for the water system annually into the toilet cassette and leaving it closed and upside down in the garden for a day or two. No recurrence since.
  9. I'm pleased to found some helpful souls to suport you after your wheel detachment. Mentioning the spare wheel serves as a timely reminder for people to check what's involved in accessing their spare wheels, car and caravan, at least once per year. It was stated that the van was resting partially on the spare wheel carrier after the wheel detatchment. I submit that it's hardly fair to criticise the spare wheel carrier as being difficult to access after supporting some of the weight of the caravan. It may have been damaged in the incident. As you say, "It definitely needs a new wheel carrier ..."
  10. An implied extension of HC Rule 170 which applies to pedestrians crossing at junctions, some of the rule says, "If they (pedestrians) have started to cross they have priority, so (vehicles and cycles) give way."
  11. We have had an ATMB tag for a few years. A problem arising from being charged incorrectly when we were using the tag on the motorbike was sorted out quickly and professionally by email. 10/10 from me.
  12. I've got one of these; https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/PUNCTURE-PROOF-4-10-3-50-4-MOBILITY-SCOOTER-TYRE-BRAND-NEW-GREY/131844917878?hash=item1eb291ca76:g:5s0AAMXQgb1RQNnd We don't have a mover but we have pushed/pulled the caravan over all sorts of terrain. When fitted, the tyre behaves exactly like an (inflated) pneumatic tyre. It can't be fitted unless your jockey wheel has the split rim secured by bolts.
  13. I have a lightweight coiled-up wire drain cleaner in case of blockages. Never needed it myself but it's been borrowed a couple of times.
  14. According to the Telegraph, the cyclist conducted his own defence and didn't claim for damages off the woman pedestrian. The Judge ruled cyclist and pedestrian were equally to blame but only the pedestrian claimed, leaving the cyclist to stump up court costs and compo.
  15. Get off to Halfords and buy some soon-to-be-invented black sponge to shove in the gaps. Makes sense; it's the same principle as Grayston spring assisters.
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