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handyandy

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About handyandy

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  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    West Midlands
  • Towcar
    Skoda Superb
  • Caravan
    Lunar Eclipse

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  1. That is the current “solution”, which isn’t working, and is therefore the problem! People are not prepared to go through the hassle of doing it. It puts another obstacle in the way and makes buying a caravan no longer an easy option. When B+E was brought in back in 1997 it was marketed, if that’s the right word, as not affecting the majority of family caravans. And it didn’t. In 2020 it does affect the majority of family caravans. I don’t think Swift or Coachman have a family model in their range that could be towed on a B licence by a newcomer observing the 85% rule. The Alpine 4 is possibly, but I wouldn’t really call it a family van. The EU saw this problem coming and introduced the B96 licence, which most countries adopted. We didn’t. Their sales are up and ours are down. Not the only reason I know but a factor.
  2. There is a B killing sales, but it’s not Boris. It is the limitations of the B driving licence. Throwback to 1997 and a typical family tourer was 1200kg ish MTPLM. A suitable car would have had a gross weight of around 2000kg. It was relatively easy to stay within the 3500kg limit. Now you are looking at a family caravan weighing 1400-1500kg MTPLM and around 2300kg for a typical car. You just can’t do it. As soon as you tell somebody they have to do another driving test it puts them off. Younger people are just not coming into the industry. They choose tents, statics or cottage hire instead. The B+E test is a joke as far as caravanning is concerned (I’ve done it) and I would suggest that a CCC or CMC course give a far better grounding. Before it is too late the industry needs to be pushing for the B licence limits to be adjusted in line with vehicle development or the introduction of the B96 licence. This lets you tow a combination up to 4250kg in exchange for partaking in a few hours of training ( no test), along the lines of the club courses. This category was not taken up by the UK when introduced by the EU. The 3500kg limit has helped motorhome sales as 3500kg motorhome where easier to come by than 3500kg car caravan combos. This is going to reduce though thanks to WLTP limits and the push to electric vehicles.
  3. There is a fuse in the black control box which is part of the burner module. It is located under the hot water tank on the inside but has to be removed from the outside! Ensure gas and 12v power are both off before starting. To get at it you have to remove the outside cowl and cover plate behind this. You then need to remove the burner module and pull the control box out with it. You can then get into the control box and change the fuse. Doing this breaks a gas seal and a seal between the combustion chamber and caravan habitation area so I would advise using a qualified gas engineer. It is not the greatest bit of design really.
  4. I think Coachman must win the award for most expensive (and useless) upgrade. On the new Acadia 545 your £35 gets you 3kg. Needless to say it is off the shortlist!
  5. Does anybody know how wide it is? Is it the same as the vision/pastiche or has it grown to the same as the vip?
  6. Well done Mr Plodd. I knew you would get there in the end. Happy Christmas to all.
  7. This is not the case I’m afraid. If you go an source a car say for the German market and try and register it over here using the coc you will come unstuck. Apart from the the steering wheel being on the wrong side, the fog light may be on the wrong side, the headlights will be wrong and it won’t have mph on the speedo. It therefore won’t meet C&U. You would need to therefore go through the import procedure and make alterations.
  8. As said previously, if a uk caravan is sold abroad or permanently export it would then refer back to the coc. Type approval on uk sold/run caravans is effectively worthless. It is an offence to sell or use an o2 trailer without type approval in the uk. It is not an offence to make alterations to it after it has received approval. As there is no notifiable alteration scheme for o2 trailers with overrun brakes Bailey have a free hand and what they say goes.
  9. Because they have stupidly low power cables. You can by special arrangement. We can still build and run them over here though, in the same way we can replate our trailers. Anybody who thinks there is any harmony with either vehicle standards and road policing across Europe is very mistaken!
  10. Well how do uk truck driver argue their ministry plates abroad then. I would say that if it is a uk registered vehicle with a uk licenced driver and legal in the uk the foreign plod wouldn’t have a leg to stand on. As long a it hadn’t been out of the uk for over twelve months of course. Using your logic anybody travelling abroad with only one fog light on the uk side would be in trouble!
  11. No it doesn’t if the vehicle is registered.
  12. The road traffic act allows the secretary of state to authorise alteration that override the original coc. They are not making up laws.
  13. The maximum gross in the statutory area of the plate matches the mtplm outside it. But what does the coc say? I suspect the higher weight. Elddis and lunar are doctoring the statutory plate. Bailey coachman swift are adding another plate. Which plate/weight is legal? Whichever one the manufacturer says is!
  14. I believe they still match. It would be interesting to see if none upgraded elddis and lunar coc’s match the plate. I bet they don’t.
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