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beejay

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About beejay

  • Rank
    Senior Member with over 5000 posts

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    UK
  • Towcar
    Hyundai/VW
  • Caravan
    awaiting replacement

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  1. Still in common use in France, mainly for the boulangeries. The "fermature hebdomadaire" - weekly closing, as it used to be in the UK in times past. In my local town it was Wednesday afternoon. BTW Marchie, an excellent post on Sunday at 18.46. Thank you. Why won't this forum number posts and why is it so ***** slow? It can take 10 seconds to load a thread.
  2. The dipped beam for a right hand drive car will not meet the requirements for a left hand drive car. Whilst modern headlamps may have a flat topped dipped beam they still will not meet the requirements of EU countries that drive on the right. If a UK vehicle is imported into the EU the first things that needs changing to pass the appropriate test are the headlamps. Legislation in France (and, no doubt, in most of the EU) requires that dipped beams dip to the right and do not dazzle other motorists so a French vehicle with maladjusted dipped beam lamps could cause dazzle. As this is a subjective opinion unless a police officer considers a vehicle is causing dazzle to other motorists no offence is committed. Could this be the reason that such offences have not been reported on UK forums? They are available at French ports with ferries to the UK and at Eurotunnel. They are not likely to be on sale anywhere else for obvious reasons!
  3. You are quite entertaining but, sometimes, you do quote some twaddle about France. What's your problem with France and the French? If you don't like them keep your disparaging comments to yourself because you are on a loser with Francophiles. How many from the UK visit France compared to Germany - and why? I could start about Germans and Germany (where I have worked) but Iaccept that there are different, sometimes very different, attitudes compared to UK life. Your large German caravan and appropriate tow vehicle is not the norm in the UK so droning on about it goes over the heads of most UK caravanners. In fact, you do little to encourage people to visit Germany.
  4. Good grammar and punctuation are a courtesy...................
  5. These, presumably, have to take into account large commercial vehicles and will avoid restrictions to such traffic on roads which may appear to be more direct?
  6. Many years ago I stayed on the Calais campsite next to the port. This is built on a mound leaving caravans exposed to the wind. During the night a gale got up so I turned my caravan head to wind and re-coupled to the car. An hour later the caravan beside me was overturned by the wind despite being tied down to steel posts ( a seasonal pitch). By morning another three had been moved by the wind from their locations to rest against something solid like the toilet block or another caravan. The new site in Calais is on open ground with no shade or wind protection but less exposed than the original site.
  7. Type approvals for hitch and tow bar do not include the cable which has no specification listed. As I posted way, way back the fixing at either end will fail after the brake is applied but the cable will not break. Photos showing failed end fittings are plentiful but not one of a broken cable! I contacted Al-Ko and BPW many years ago about breakaway cables but both refused to supply any information stating it was "commercially sensitive". I had tested 10 cables of various makes and all failed when the dog clip straightened out it but these were the standard fitting at the time.
  8. The usual trite remark or did you forget the emoticon? Traffic cops deal with traffic
  9. There is no specification for a breakaway cable and the "dog lead clip" has proved able to apply the brake successfully for many years. The cable rarely fails unless it's rusty. It will be the tow bar clip or handbrake clip that fails depending on the types used.
  10. beejay

    Gas hose length

    Try buying a longer hose in France. I spent two seasons in France for a holiday company installing cookers in large family tents which needed a hose of 2 metre length for a safe installation. Every source of supply quoted 1.5m as the maximum the regulations permitted so rolls of tubing were bought in the UK.
  11. They didn't get a fine so why were they not happy? The police were very conscientious in setting up the check point near a motor parts store enabling them to advise drivers where to get what is necessary to comply with the law.
  12. Will there be a transaction fee saving as the fuel will be billed in euros and will be converted by whom and at what rate?
  13. Having watched AlKo's German repair shop strip and re-rubber my Burstner axle** back in 2003 I am intrigued by the reference to longer rubber inserts. As I recall it the axle bars almost met in the middle of the axle tube and were slightly shorter than the three rubber inserts. Are Al-Ko now using shorter axles as well as lower quality rubber compound? ** Re-rubbered because the UK market version Burstner had installed the heavy components down the right hand side and overloaded the right hand axle. Despite the superb layout with full end bathroom/dressing room layout it was traded after 15 months!
  14. beejay

    Gas hose length

    Murphy's law applies! A long bbq hose IS a trip hazard and seen far too often on sites.
  15. beejay

    Gas hose length

    France has a limit of 1.5metres for LPG gas hose sales. Using a long hose for a bbq really is playing with fire
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