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Grandpa Steve

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About Grandpa Steve

  • Rank
    SteveB
  • Birthday 01/12/2000

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    Steve
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Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Derbyshire
  • Interests
    Caravaning of course
  • Towcar
    Mercedes GLC 250d Sport Premium
  • Caravan
    2008 Swift Conqueror 540

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5,354 profile views
  1. As per the numerous replies to this topic, the manuals are one of the the first topics in this section.
  2. Financial services and Credit industry
  3. Clueless, what ever you want to read and believe is fine by me, I am not going waste time trying to explain. You have made up your mind i am wrong, so there is no point in me wasting any time trying to tell you differently. But I’d it helps credit doesn’t have to be involved, the scope of the FCA is much wider. You conclude what you want, I already have !
  4. Thank you for your encouraging words!
  5. What ever you want to read and believe is fine by me, I am not going waste time trying to explain.
  6. What ever you want to read and believe is fine by me!
  7. Clearly gleaned from a short search on the internet without any actual knowledge of the FCA, but don’t let me stop you from reading, you might eventually understand. ***************************** Any dealer that offers finance or any kind of insurance product such a GAP, PPI, or warranty (which is all franchised dealers and 90+% of used dealers) is regulated by the FCA, so in effect all dealers. Regardless of the CRA their conduct in how they treat customers falls under the FCA, so even if you say under law they are not required to disclose a Cat C right off, by not disclosing material information that could affect the customers decision to make the purchase, the dealer falls foul of the FCA’s requirment to “Treating customers fairly”, and does not meet the overarching principle of “Good customer outcomes”. The FCA has statutory powers to fine dealers, impose sanctions, restrict their ability to sell, and can hold individuals and companies to account. As I said to LE, I come at this from a completely different angle to him, and I have never said he was wrong, I have posted alternative facts that have a legal bearing on the selling of cars, caravans and motorcycles, (Idon’t do white goods). The involvement and the regulation by the FCA crosses over and blurs the line between what is legal and what is right, and offers another level of legally enforceable protection for consumers.
  8. I give up, you do your thing and I will do mine. Still recommend you learn more about the FCA because Your replies don’t give any indication you understand their role and their statutory powers, enshrined by legislation.
  9. If that is your professional opinion then you are not as smart as you think you are, perhaps you need to widen your horizons and do some reading.
  10. Go find it yourself, I am not your servant! Search FCA, CONC, Treating Customers Fairly. Her try reading this from cover to cover, I have on more than one occasion https://www.handbook.fca.org.uk/handbook/CONC/1/?view=chapter This explains about the spirit of the law https://www.fca.org.uk/news/speeches/consumer-credit-seminar
  11. Truly, I would lose my job
  12. Unfortunately I am not permitted to disclose my occupation, suffice to say my day job involves a lot of work with the outputs from the Financial Conduct Authority. So whist I cannot quote you law as LE does, in consumer law as regulated by the FCA it is not just the black and white of the law that counts, if you care to read up on FCA, it is the spirit of the legislation and how it is interpreted that is equally important. It is not just about applying the law, it is about how the dealer approaches the way they treat customers, the term is called “Supporting Good Customer Outcomes” So sorry to burst you bubble, it is not just my opinion.
  13. No one person is bigger than the forum, so it is your choice. What fee you charge has no bearing on your contribution, you have no idea what my job is or who I work for or how much my hourly rate is, but for a full day out it’s 4 figures. I do not try to undermine your advice, you speak from a purely legal stand point ( I don’t know if consumer law is your specific field), but my perspective is from the practical application of consumer law, and the interpretation of the FCA CONC rule book. So whilst you quote the purely legal aspect, I come at it from the other side, which is how the dealer/retailer embraces not just the legal aspect but the spirit of the legislation. If it turns out that the dealer did advertise and price the caravan as A1 and did not disclose it’s history, which is a material fact that would have ifluenced the buyers decision, then in the spirit of the CONC legislation that is not permitted.
  14. Why would they, the NCC is the representative body of the tourer, motorhome, caravan holiday home and residential park home industries.
  15. A trader seller i.e. a dealer has a duty to ensure they provide sufficient information for the buyer to make an informed decision when making a purchase. So if a buyer, due to material facts not being disclosed, unknowingly purchases an insurance right off whilst being lead to believe they are buying a caravan that is in A1 condition considering age and condition, then the seller is in the wrong. Also the buyer could find that having unknowingly bought the caravan they cannot secure insurance, a material fact that would also have influence the decision to make the purchase. Caveat Emptor still applies, but when buying from a “professional” I.e. the dealer, is not exempt from ensuring the customer has sufficient information to make an informed decision.
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