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Where Do You Put Your Feet?


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#1 AlanNancy

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Posted 21 February 2012 - 05:53 PM

Where do you put your feet?

I think that in cycling there has been a ‘lost generation’. I notice when I am out on my bike just how many people cycle with their feet in the wrong place on the pedals – i.e. with the front of the heel of the shoe pushed up against the pedals instead of cycling with the ball of the foot. If the parents don’t know how to cycle then how can they tell their children?

Although the words ‘Health and Safety’ want to make you run a mile I think it’s worth taking sensible precautions. I always cycle with: -
Cycle Helmet
Cycle Gloves (summer and winter)
Glasses – I have a set with interchangeable lenses, Clear, tinted, dark tinted.
Cycle clothing – I don’t use a high visibility vest but the clothing I wear could hardly be missed – Lampre, pink and blue – Once, yellow – Bianchi, celeste (turquoise blue).
Flashing LED rear light – which I use in anything but good sun light.

Alan

#2 jeff fae Scotland

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Posted 21 February 2012 - 06:05 PM

Kids on bikes..you must be joking.Never seen a kid on a bike since the invention of the silicone chip.Thanks for posting the things that will keep them safe.

#3 Lefthand Down

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Posted 21 February 2012 - 06:18 PM

I found the right place when I started wearing toeclips on my rat-trap pedals. B)

On a ride of 80 miles I managed to cut right through my shoes. It was 50 years ago and 'leather' was not what it is today.

I did ride a grocery bike like Granville's (Open All Hours) and you soon get the best place to place your feet to get some power into the wheels.

I can't agree with the flashing rear light though. I think it is illegal. :P

Tests showed the flashing light seemed to draw cars like a moth to the flame. :unsure:

#4 mw3230

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Posted 21 February 2012 - 06:35 PM

The OP gives the impression that she/he is disapproving of those who do not ride in the "approved" manner. I say we should love and let live and applaud and support all who ride. It's a good healthy social pastime!

#5 hawkaye

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Posted 21 February 2012 - 08:37 PM

...
I can't agree with the flashing rear light though. I think it is illegal. :P
...


It's been legal since 23rd October 2005
http://www.legislati...gulation/6/made
6) h.
:P :P :D

I cycle with toeclips keeping the ball of my foot on the pedal.

#6 Lefthand Down

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Posted 21 February 2012 - 08:42 PM

I am still learning after all these years.

I cycle with toeclips keeping the ball of my foot on the pedal.


I bet its hard to change gear on the motorbike with toeclips. :P :D

#7 TheTravellingRooster

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Posted 22 February 2012 - 08:40 AM

Hi to you all out there. I still cycle with Marcel Berthet Lyotard platfom pedals and Christophe short toe-clips and Leather straps;on all three bikes. The oldest pedals are best part of 50yrs old and the younger are 35yrs+.
I still ride Traditional Vittoria Leather Cycling Shoes with aluminium plates with the groove widened for more float. I tried the clipless,"No Thank You".
Used correctly pedals & toeclips can contribute greatly to efficiency of effort/power to the pedals. There are toeclips that are designed for use without straps for the beginner/faint-hearted.
The positioning of the ball of the foot is entire down to the length of the toe-clips.
The Flashing Lights as Hawkaye has stated are legal but need to comply with a particular specification and I believe that they are far safer than the regular old style and are power saving, albeit mine operate on 4xAA Rechargeable batteries.

#8 TheTravellingRooster

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Posted 22 February 2012 - 09:56 AM

Hi again. Further to my post #7. I wear a Hi-Vis item in the receding hours of light especially from September until the very bad weather and then again for the first ventures out when most of the drivers are in semi hibernation mode whilst staring at their Sat-Navs.
I always wear good quality Crocheted Leather palm Track Mits,yes even in the Summer.
I have 2pairs of Leather Vittoria shoes,one pair are always kept dry and polished ready for the next run out after a previous wet return.

#9 Glen and Les

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Posted 22 February 2012 - 10:08 AM

We are "leisure cyclists" and I have noticed that whilst hubby has ball of foot on the pedal, I have the flat, middle part of my foot on my pedals, which I feel more confident with - the ground isn't so far away if I were to fall off and it does take some of the strain off the knees (well I think it does anyway). As we are not "professionals" I really don't think it matters, as MW3230 pointed out above - the point is that we enjoy our little cycling trips, however we pedal.

#10 spannaz

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Posted 22 February 2012 - 10:31 AM

I cycle mostly off-road, muddy tracks and big descents and the likes, i sue clip in's on one side for the fast bumpy stuff, and normal flats on the reverse when i might need to put a foot down rapidly.

There are other advantages of having your foot locked into the right position, one of those is lost energy on the up stroke, means you can push and pull, rather than just pull. (yes it really is far more efficient)
The other thing is when it does get really bumpy, your foot does not slip or bounce off the pedal, this usually results in a rapid decent onto a cross bar or the likes and a whack in the shin from a pedal!!!! Funny to watch but not so funny to experience.

However, as rightly put, my kids cycle and whether right or wrongly, as long as they are, then that's gotta be better than sat inside the van with the DS or Nintendo or whatever. Even our eldest at 7 tows his 2 year old around all day long in the buggy..........they both love it, and means no one is left out.
:) :) :) :)

#11 AlanNancy

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Posted 22 February 2012 - 03:37 PM

The OP gives the impression that she/he is disapproving of those who do not ride in the "approved" manner. I say we should love and let live and applaud and support all who ride. It's a good healthy social pastime!


I think that mw3230 has totally misunderstood my posting.
It’s nothing to do with ‘disapproving’ or ‘Riding in the Approved Manner’ it’s simply that by placing the ball of your foot on the pedals it is more efficient than when you have your instep on the pedals. When my children could cycle quite well I told them that it’s easier to ride with the balls of their feet on the pedals and in turn they have told their children (my grandchildren). What is the problem in that?

I am sorry Glen and Les but I don’t understand how cycling with your instep instead of the balls of make you closer to the ground.

I love the TravellingRooster’s posts – a real cyclist if ever there was one.
Alan

#12 TheTravellingRooster

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Posted 22 February 2012 - 03:52 PM

We are "leisure cyclists" and I have noticed that whilst hubby has ball of foot on the pedal, I have the flat, middle part of my foot on my pedals, which I feel more confident with - the ground isn't so far away if I were to fall off and it does take some of the strain off the knees (well I think it does anyway). As we are not "professionals" I really don't think it matters, as MW3230 pointed out above - the point is that we enjoy our little cycling trips, however we pedal.


Hi Glen & Les. Depending on your chosen footwear riding with the "Flat Bits" (The Arches) can inflict serious pain/discomfort especially when off the seat and standing on the pedals as one might do when climbing hills/gradients.

#13 morepower

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Posted 22 February 2012 - 03:55 PM

I have always used the ball of my foot... Mostly because of the toe clips on my racers as a kid and it feels natural to me.. Now I use Speedplay Frog Clip peddles and like all shoe and pedal systems put your foot over the peddle in just the right place. The othe aspects like riding gear... I usually have gloves on but if I am just on the common I dont bother with my helmet as it is just leasurely and I dont need to ride on any roads from our house as we live ON the common... But if I am going for a real ride or on the road.. Yes I wear a helmet... Lights and stuff I always have lights fitted and carry a tool kit. Other clothing is just cycling shorts and whatever I am comfortable in.....

#14 TheTravellingRooster

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Posted 22 February 2012 - 04:01 PM

I cycle mostly off-road, muddy tracks and big descents and the likes, i sue clip in's on one side for the fast bumpy stuff, and normal flats on the reverse when i might need to put a foot down rapidly.

There are other advantages of having your foot locked into the right position, one of those is lost energy on the up stroke, means you can push and pull, rather than just pull. (yes it really is far more efficient)
The other thing is when it does get really bumpy, your foot does not slip or bounce off the pedal, this usually results in a rapid decent onto a cross bar or the likes and a whack in the shin from a pedal!!!! Funny to watch but not so funny to experience.

However, as rightly put, my kids cycle and whether right or wrongly, as long as they are, then that's gotta be better than sat inside the van with the DS or Nintendo or whatever. Even our eldest at 7 tows his 2 year old around all day long in the buggy..........they both love it, and means no one is left out.
:) :) :) :)


Hi spannaz. I first went onto serious cycling back in the mid 60's with my 1937 Hetchins Curly (Vibrant Triangle) track frame on Sprints & Tubs with a fixed gear. Try riding fixed wheel with no toe-clips or plain pedals instead of clipless pedals if they are what you like. I have seen the "Know-Alls. on fixed wheel with ordinary pedals skinned to the bone on their shins and damaged calf muscles because of slipping off the pedals and that is without the damage to their 'landing gear'.

#15 AlanNancy

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Posted 22 February 2012 - 05:39 PM

Hi spannaz. I first went onto serious cycling back in the mid 60's with my 1937 Hetchins Curly (Vibrant Triangle) track frame on Sprints & Tubs with a fixed gear. Try riding fixed wheel with no toe-clips or plain pedals instead of clipless pedals if they are what you like. I have seen the "Know-Alls. on fixed wheel with ordinary pedals skinned to the bone on their shins and damaged calf muscles because of slipping off the pedals and that is without the damage to their 'landing gear'.


The TravelingRooster as I am of a certain age I think your cycling posts are wonderfull, but I think one of two people that read them may not quite understand - Hetchins Curly - Track Frame - Sprints - Tubs - Fixed Gear. To me it takes me back to my youth but unfortunatly I didn't have a Hetchens.
A few years ago I took the lads that worked for me in our Mountain Bike Warehouse to the cycle track in Portsmouth, they hadn't ridden fixed wheel before so when they finished their laps they simply stopped pedaling - and proceded to be thrown up and down on the saddle rather like a horse rider!
I did buy a track bike for one of them and we fitted a front brake so that he could go time trialing.
Alan
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#16 Glen and Les

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Posted 22 February 2012 - 06:33 PM

I am sorry Glen and Les but I don’t understand how cycling with your instep instead of the balls of make you closer to the ground.

It's all to do with confidence and saddle height! I need to be able to comfortably put my feet on the ground when at a standstill, so if I were to pedal with the balls of my feet I guess the saddle would need to be higher, placing me higher off the ground!

Hi Glen & Les. Depending on your chosen footwear riding with the "Flat Bits" (The Arches) can inflict serious pain/discomfort especially when off the seat and standing on the pedals as one might do when climbing hills/gradients.


My hubby laughed at this! I don't "do" hills/gradients - yet! I've only just remastered cycling after probably 40 years or so and am still getting to grips with level(ish) tracks. But - next time the bikes come out (in a few weeks hopefully), I will take on board what's been said and give the balls a try!

Thanks, Glen.

#17 Gordon

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Posted 22 February 2012 - 07:16 PM

If you're at all concerned about being able to put your foot down, then I suggest that an MTB style would be most appropriate, as these can have a lowered cross bar so reducing the risk of becoming an unintentional castrato. The saddle should be set so that your leg is fully straight at the bottom of the stroke, so by definition your foot will not reach the ground without tilting the bike to one side. I use a B'Twin from Décathlon as shown in the first picture below for general use, and find this to be ideal for both road, and gentle off-road use, and the full suspension means that you can ride all day in comfort.
The lightweight Falcon in the second picture was where I started, although that spends more time in the shed now than on the road. I used to use toe-clips with the leather straps set so I could slide my foot out if needed, but the rat traps are now used without the clips these days. Suffice to say that I always use the ball of the foot on the pedal.
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Attached File  B\'Twin.jpg   21.13KB   5 downloads B'Twin
Attached File  FalconCycle.jpg   32.79KB   6 downloads Falcon

#18 spannaz

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Posted 23 February 2012 - 08:34 PM

Hi spannaz. I first went onto serious cycling back in the mid 60's with my 1937 Hetchins Curly (Vibrant Triangle) track frame on Sprints & Tubs with a fixed gear. Try riding fixed wheel with no toe-clips or plain pedals instead of clipless pedals if they are what you like. I have seen the "Know-Alls. on fixed wheel with ordinary pedals skinned to the bone on their shins and damaged calf muscles because of slipping off the pedals and that is without the damage to their 'landing gear'.


fixed wheel......off road.......are you nuts lol!!! Take my hat off and salute you. We are truly spoilt these days, even when i was a boy, we'd ride for miles up the steepest hills with one fixed gear. Now........no one does, except the odd few in London. However it is the BEST way to build up stamina and strength!!

#19 Cannondale

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Posted 23 February 2012 - 08:40 PM

Not much choice for me as I use clipless peddles on both mountain and road bikes.

Richard...

#20 AlanNancy

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Posted 24 February 2012 - 08:05 AM

Not much choice for me as I use clipless peddles on both mountain and road bikes.

Richard...


I also use clipless peddles on both my mountain bike and road bike.
Alan




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