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#21 BryanS

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Posted 29 June 2012 - 11:36 AM

Would that be the pops that you have built.. based on the posie?? .. If so... how did you find it to build?


Popsie! It's an easy build, just one or two places where you have to figure the detail out your way.
Mine's electric-powered - looks and flies rather like a portly bug.

#22 Guest_Inner State_*

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Posted 29 June 2012 - 05:18 PM

I'm another model aircraft flyer. Nothing exceptional, just models that give the mind a bit of exercise or give the satisfaction of making something that works. In fact, if I've figured it correctly, I've built one of Inner State's kits - and very nice it was too!

By the way, a quarter-scale Cub fits nicely under the bed in a Bailey Burgundy. With wings detached of course.

Bry

Excellent news and glad you liked it.

Regards - John

#23 DeadMeatUK

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Posted 29 June 2012 - 06:59 PM

I had a large LNER outfit 12ft x 8ft (3 x 8tf x 4ft sheets ) of OO with a large amount of rolling stock and about 10 engines .

Then I got married and it now sits in boxes in the loft . :lol:

My old club had large layouts of 0 gauge .
http://www.northolt-mrc.org.uk/

Dave


I have lots of OO stuff... the oldest was purchased in 1977, I can't remember the name but the engine is a 4'6'0 and has 4 Pullman coaches. It has been in various lofts for the last 17 years... wonder if it has appreciated in value? In fact it's next to the mountain of boxed Starwars stuff of which I know has some valuable pieces :)

#24 Georgiegal

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Posted 29 June 2012 - 07:53 PM

Popsie! It's an easy build, just one or two places where you have to figure the detail out your way.
Mine's electric-powered - looks and flies rather like a portly bug.


Have sent you a pm.

#25 phillip charnwood forest

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Posted 24 October 2012 - 07:18 PM

I'm just starting out in model engineering having just got my "new" second hand lathe.

I sold my Myford super 7b pxf that my late brother in law gave me. I did quite a fair bit of restoration to it but it still needed to be finished, a new back gear being the main thing to replace. My brother in law sadly died just after christmas and I have now got his new lathe that he had new. I believe that it's a clock makers lathe as his friend was a clock maker restorer and been in buisness for a number of years and was a major influence on him. I can't for the life of me find what the make of the lathe is tho' but it was his from new so I think of it as being his, the Myford he bought second hand. If that makes sense to you. Somewhere the books to it are at my sisters house possibly in the workshop but there is much to sort out in there. I will I,m sure get them eventually.

I have been looking at making a hot air engine as I have found a site on the internet and got the dimensioned drawings for it downloaded, I just have to get started now.

#26 CommanderDave

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Posted 02 November 2012 - 10:00 AM

I'm just starting out in model engineering having just got my "new" second hand lathe.

I sold my Myford super 7b pxf that my late brother in law gave me. I did quite a fair bit of restoration to it but it still needed to be finished, a new back gear being the main thing to replace. My brother in law sadly died just after christmas and I have now got his new lathe that he had new. I believe that it's a clock makers lathe as his friend was a clock maker restorer and been in buisness for a number of years and was a major influence on him. I can't for the life of me find what the make of the lathe is tho' but it was his from new so I think of it as being his, the Myford he bought second hand. If that makes sense to you. Somewhere the books to it are at my sisters house possibly in the workshop but there is much to sort out in there. I will I,m sure get them eventually.

I have been looking at making a hot air engine as I have found a site on the internet and got the dimensioned drawings for it downloaded, I just have to get started now.


Having a good lathe is a good basic start .

Dave

#27 phillip charnwood forest

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Posted 19 November 2012 - 09:21 AM

Hello every-one.

Can any-one give me a little bit of advice please. The lathe that I have now got has a coolant tank and pump etc, the lathe is in an unheated garage that gets down to freezing point at times in the winter ( I bet some-one has got a good idea of the question that I'm going to ask already) :) .

1. Will the coolant freeze or as it has got emulsifying oil it won't freeze?
2. If it will freeze can I put some motor vehicle anti-freeze in it as that has got corrosion inhibitors in it?
3.Would it affect the coolant, in that will it go gooey a bit like sour milk?

It may sound a simple and silly question to you, but I don't know the answer.

Thanks every-one'

Phillip.

Edited by phillip charnwood forest, 19 November 2012 - 09:27 AM.


#28 CommanderDave

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Posted 19 November 2012 - 12:02 PM

Hello every-one.

Can any-one give me a little bit of advice please. The lathe that I have now got has a coolant tank and pump etc, the lathe is in an unheated garage that gets down to freezing point at times in the winter ( I bet some-one has got a good idea of the question that I'm going to ask already) :) .

1. Will the coolant freeze or as it has got emulsifying oil it won't freeze?
2. If it will freeze can I put some motor vehicle anti-freeze in it as that has got corrosion inhibitors in it?
3.Would it affect the coolant, in that will it go gooey a bit like sour milk?

It may sound a simple and silly question to you, but I don't know the answer.

Thanks every-one'

Phillip.



i have not heard of problems with freezing coolants in the past but not knowing your garage and what its built of for producing condensation it is best to cover machinery in the winter as they can get damp . Friends i know in the winter shut down their workshops if it gets really cold and spray their machines with something like WD40 and cover them with blankets . If the garage is brick or concrete it will produce more damp than a wood building . My workshop is of wood and 4 " insulated so the temperature inside hardly changes stopped condensation.


To see if it freezes .
Take a bit out of the tank and put in a tin/plastic bottle (not Glass) and leave it outside over night or put in the freezer over night .

Dave

#29 david 1220

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Posted 19 November 2012 - 01:10 PM

Hello every-one.

Can any-one give me a little bit of advice please. The lathe that I have now got has a coolant tank and pump etc, the lathe is in an unheated garage that gets down to freezing point at times in the winter ( I bet some-one has got a good idea of the question that I'm going to ask already) :) .

1. Will the coolant freeze or as it has got emulsifying oil it won't freeze?
2. If it will freeze can I put some motor vehicle anti-freeze in it as that has got corrosion inhibitors in it?
3.Would it affect the coolant, in that will it go gooey a bit like sour milk?

It may sound a simple and silly question to you, but I don't know the answer.

Thanks every-one'

Phillip.

Hi,
First off i think what you are describing is cutting fluid, One used "as bought " and the other is mixed with water i use the as bought type and my workshop is not heated ( or should i say -only by my body ! ) and i have had no problems.
​Lathe,- if its a true watchmakers lathe then i think you will find it a bit restrictive for model making as they use collets and turn " between centers." Machining say cylinders could be a problem.
Hot air engines, I am a member of the " stirling engine society " and have been building engines for ,well a while ! would suggest looking at a "rider" type of engine.
david

#30 phillip charnwood forest

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Posted 19 November 2012 - 07:38 PM

Thanks Commander Dave & David, I use a dehumidifier in the garage all year round to be honest due to some of my other machinery and things in there. I didn't give the test a thought to be honest, it seems a good idea, as long SWMBO doesn't catch me :D . I will give it a try when she isn't about.

David the lathe isn't a watch mackers lathe it's too big for that, but MAY be a clock makers, as I put in the original post by me, my late brother-in-laws friend was a clock maker (I can't spell horologist) :) and the lathe is the sort of size that he used. He used to cut gears on his lathe too. If I remember rightly (I hadn't seen him for many years) he had a set up with a seperate overhead drive and a small dividing head and a milling cutter. I can't remember much about it as it was a long time ago and I didn't see much of it, so could be barking up the wrong tree.

I can turn about 500m/m long between centres & approx 80m/m centre height. It isn't as big as my Myford was though, neither as long or as high in total height.

The oil that I'm using is emulsifying oil. I use the same type that we use at work in the big band saw & the same that we used in the other machines when we still had a machine shop & mix it with water.

I got some drawings from the internet & and down loaded them of a couple of stirling engines, and may indeed make one of them as my first project. I am in the process now of gathering all the materials together to built either that or a wobble engine that I have seen & have some drawings for also. A friend of mine is going to give his assistance with making a boiler doing the high temperature silver soldering for me. He until about 6 months ago used to do something to do with jet engines where it was silver soldered for Rolls Royce, so ti has a pretty fair chance of passing a hydraulic a steam pressure test I would think.

What is a rider type engine? I am only a beginer in this hobby so a lot of terminology and names of types of different things will be new to me, so I may be asking some simple questions of you.

Thanks to you both, the replies will help me loads, and I look forward to more exchanges with you both.

Phillip. :)

#31 david 1220

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Posted 19 November 2012 - 08:49 PM

Hi Phil,
Regarding the hot air engine-- silver soldering a boiler ? perhaps i have mis-understood. The rider hot air engine,-- two cylinders of the same size/ stroke one piston has an extension on its crown thats a ( very ) loose fit in the hot cap extension. the other cylinder is the cold one and the air is "shunted" from one cylinder to another via a passage way. the cylinder with the extension is the hot cylinder and is heated. this engine was invented by an American called---- mr Rider ! hence the name.
The other type of hot air engine is the Stirling ,( Dr Stirling d.d. minister, church of Scotland )some say invented by him but in truth refined by him -he did invent the regenerator though.Should point out that the above rider engine the two cylinders are connected to a common crank shaft but 90% out of phase.
​If you google hot air engine or stirling engine you should find our web site ( stirling engine society ) were you will find all sorts of info, by all means give us a shout-- theirs all sorts of engine design but they all rely on the same basic thing --the expansion of gas when heated and contraction when cooled.
​should point out that the rider engine is ( compared to a stirling type ) a high revving engine- mine clocks 3000 r.p.m. with a 1" bore x 1" stroke.
david

Edited by david 1220, 19 November 2012 - 08:52 PM.


#32 clairendave

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Posted 19 November 2012 - 11:29 PM

If you want to have a go at RC flying give me a yell, I can arrange it for you!

J

Would that be the pops that you have built.. based on the posie?? .. If so... how did you find it to build?



Or me... i fly in wind he dont dare to!! ;)


Sorry i have only just seen these brave offers. The only flying i have done is with a parkzone type plane. And yes i did crash it. This is since you both replied. I do own a basic heli but i never find the space and correct weather.




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