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Fitting A Motor Mover


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#1 julesmart

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Posted 12 May 2009 - 12:21 PM

OH thinking of having a mover. I can get a second hand one for about 375 Are they easy to fit, or do you need brains! :lol:

#2 FM02MZO

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Posted 12 May 2009 - 12:32 PM

It depends on your capabilities if they are easy to fit or not. You must have a reasonable electrical and mechanical knowledge, plus the tools to do the job and unless you are a bit of a Limbo Dancer, means of lifting the caravan high enough for you to get underneath and be able to work both comfortably and safely

#3 Brassneck

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Posted 12 May 2009 - 01:21 PM

It depends on your capabilities if they are easy to fit or not. You must have a reasonable electrical and mechanical knowledge, plus the tools to do the job and unless you are a bit of a Limbo Dancer, means of lifting the caravan high enough for you to get underneath and be able to work both comfortably and safely


Terry is pretty much spot on there, its not hard but you do need a bit of thought.

I never had to lift my van to fit my mover, but if i had the ability to it would of made it a lot easier all round. You do need to get underneath it across all sides.

Electrically its fairly simple, red wire goes to box marked + etc etc. But it does need to be thought out.

On the plus side, saving the money is a bonus, but for me its that i know every nut fitted, how its fitted, where the bits are fitted and in theory if i had a problem i could easily run through some quick simple check to eliminate it.

Example one motor not working, not clicking, nothing. I know where that motor is wired to so i will test the connections at source, that then gives me a yes or no on whats what.

Unless your standing over the fitter and taking notes, you wont really know whats what.

#4 klyne

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Posted 12 May 2009 - 01:30 PM

Its a reasonably easy job if you are adept at DIY. I have done it twice and you can see how I got on here http://www.davidklyn..._a_motor_mo.htm I can't remember where but I think there is an even more detail thread on fitting a mover on one of the forums so a Google might throw it up.

David

#5 millerhouse12

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Posted 12 May 2009 - 02:46 PM

The best instructions I've come across are the ones for the Purpleline Enduro. Most of them are fitted in a similar way and there are other instructions available on the web if you search for them. The Enduro instructions are here www.purpleline.co.uk/Enduro/Images/EM103 manual UK 06-07.pdf and should give you an idea of what's involved. It a fairly straightforward task. Practical caravan did an article on fitting the Powrtouch in the September 2008 edition.

#6 The 2 Tops

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Posted 12 May 2009 - 02:55 PM

I have fitted a mover on two caravans; our previous van, and the present van. Both are Powrtouch.

For anyone carrying out this work, one thing I have done, and recommend, is to replace the provided standard 8-off hexagon nuts, which tighten up the U-clamps, for Nyloc nuts. This is because I found it extremely difficult to ensure that ALL nuts remained fully tightened against their brackets. For example, tightening up one U-clamp on the same clamping bracket produced a slight slackening of the second U-clamp on the same bracket; then retightening that U-clamp slackened off the first one. Although the amount of slackening was minimal, it did leave some risk of loosening over time due to vibration. Using Nylock nuts removed this risk.

As has be previously said, DIY fitting of a mover is fairly straightforward, but you do need a reasonable degree of ability in the use of handtools. Where purchasing a secondhand mover is concerned, you need to ensure that the seller has kept all the relevant fitting and operating instructions. What you will miss is, if you need help, the manufacturers telephone helpline will not be available as a matter of course. They might advise, and they might not.

Once the mover has been fitted, there are a few important points to observe with the electrics.
(1) When you fit the receiving antenna under the van, do not route it back under control box. Once below the floor, it should be held by cable tacks so that it travels directly away from the control box.
(2) Keep the length of the motor supply cables all to the same length. To achieve this, I brought the cables from the motors to the centre of the van, then routed them to the control box.
(3) Make sure that the cables are not tight (i.e. free to move) at the motors.
(4) The makers recommend that you coil up and secure the excess of cable to the motors. At 12 volts, the excess cable can cause a considerable volt drop at the motors. I have cut my cables to leave about 50 mm free play at the control box and motors, to allow any future repairs to the end connectors of the cables.
(5) The master switch (with red key). To ensure nothing metal can accidently touch the terminals of this switch, I obtained a small, round food container. This has holes cut in it to allow it to enclose the switch body during assembly, and to allow access for the main positive supply cable. Snapping on the lid then provides for the switch body to be enclosed in its own little isolation box.

I hope this information is of some help to anyone doing this job for the first time.

#7 grasmere59

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Posted 12 May 2009 - 02:57 PM

I have fitted an Enduro to my van, and last week a secondhand Powrtouch 3 to my next door neighbours van.I put the jockey wheel in the "cup" of my trolley jack then wound down the jockey wheel down,then raised the trolley jack,i raised the van as far as i could without the back touching the ground then lowered the rear steadies,i then lowered the front steadies onto suitable height blocks,this gave me ample clearance to get underneath to fit the mover,just plan the route for the wiring etc and off you go.I had more trouble fitting a new water pump to my other halfs Focus on Sunday then i did fitting the motor mover!!

Edited by grasmere59, 12 May 2009 - 03:06 PM.


#8 PeteG

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Posted 12 May 2009 - 09:24 PM

I fitted a Truma mover to my Swift Challenger. Straightforward job both mechanically and electrically as long as you are a reasonably competent DIYer. As others have said good access to the underside of the caravan is needed, so take good care with that. The instructions supplied with my Truma were very good, and the supplier sent me a number of photos of the installation process which added useful detail.

Steep drive at our house and awkward pitches on sites are now no problem. Best accessory ever!

Pete

#9 jiginc

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Posted 16 May 2009 - 05:49 PM

"For anyone carrying out this work, one thing I have done, and recommend, is to replace the provided standard 8-off hexagon nuts, which tighten up the U-clamps, for Nyloc nuts. This is because I found it extremely difficult to ensure that ALL nuts remained fully tightened against their brackets. For example, tightening up one U-clamp on the same clamping bracket produced a slight slackening of the second U-clamp on the same bracket; then retightening that U-clamp slackened off the first one. Although the amount of slackening was minimal, it did leave some risk of loosening over time due to vibration. Using Nylock nuts removed this risk."

Please note that Powrtouch now supply nylock nuts as standard.

With regard to cutting the cables that supply the motors. This will mean that the voltage at the motor with the shortest cable will get a slightly higher voltage than the one with the longer cable. Not sure if this will make any difference in practice but I think it better to keep the system balanced.

Edited by jiginc, 16 May 2009 - 05:49 PM.





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